Gantal (Godfree Roberts)

3257 results


2019-04-22 on wsws

Meanwhile, Shanghai School District, #5 in provincial academic rankings, limits classroom instruction time to 15 hours weekly and provides a personal car and driver for all school principals.

The good news? The UK has adopted Shanghai’s math curriculum.


2019-04-20 on insidehighered

We have evidence, in the form of the Agency’s congressional testimony, of a sustained, professional campaign to slander China and doing a great deal of harm to China for a long time but have no evidence that international students who come from China are potential spies.

We also have abundant evidence that 55% of America’s peer-reviewed STEM papers have a Chinese author–suggesting that Chinese scientists have been doing a great deal of good for us for a long time.

I suspect we’s shooting ourselves in the foot, again, with this campaign.


2019-04-20 on insidehighered

Victor Marchetti, a staffer at the CIA’s Office of the Director, testified before Congress that the CIA budgeted $250,000,000 annually “for academics to produce negative information about China.”

It is reasonable to assume that Frontiers of Literary Studies in China is a fruit of that investment.

Is it? Does Frontiers of Literary Studies in China receive, directly or indirectly, funding from NED or any other government agency or private source hostile to China?

Enquiring minds want to know, and so should anyone involved with higher ed.


2019-04-18 on wsws

US-funded ‘labor activists’ are behind this mini-scandal, as readers can tell by who’s quoted in the story.

The students weren’t arrested for ‘their involvement in a struggle by Jasic Technology workers last year to form an independent trade union,’ they were arrested for getting involved with foreign NGOs trying to stir up trouble.

Whenever you read stories like this one, remind yourself that China has the highest union participation in the galaxy, that Chinese wages have outpaced GDP growth for 30 years and that, next year, very Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health- and old age care.

Next year, too, 500,000,000 urban Chinese will have more net worth and disposable income than the average American, their mothers and infants will be less likely to die in childbirth, their children will graduate from high school three years ahead of American kids.

Next year, too, there will be more drug addicts, suicides and executions, more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.


2019-04-18 on dezeenhq

And what would unimpressionable Westerners who have lived or worked in China say? Pray tell.


2019-04-18 on dezeenhq

In fact, China isn’t a horribly repressive regime with millions of its ethnic minorities living in what basically operates as internment camps. Its ethnic minorities are better off than Canada’s, for example.

The most recent allegations about Uyghur mistreatment were made by five countries that are currently bombing Muslim countries and are intended as a smokescreen for continued attacks. The World Muslim Congress sent inspectors to Xinjiang from 11 Muslim countries to investigate the bombers’ allegations. Most said that they were “envious” of the vocational programs for the illiterate and rural youngsters who had fallen for Wahabbism while on the Hajj.

One inspector, Mumtaz Zahra Baloch, the Charge d‘Affaires, Pakistan‘s Embassy in China, told the state-run Global Times on Thursday, “The Imams we met at the mosques and the students and teachers at the Xinjiang Islamic Institute told us that they enjoy freedom in practicing Islam, and that the Chinese government extends support for maintenance of mosques all over Xinjiang,” after visiting Xinjiang as part of delegation of diplomats. “Similarly, I did not see any sign of cultural repression. The Uighur culture as demonstrated by their language, music and dance is very much part of the life of the people of Xinjiang.”

Asked about the security situation in Xinjiang, which has been “beset by terrorism”, Baloch said, “We learned that the recent measures have resulted in improvement of the security situation in Xinjiang and there have been no incidents of terrorism in recent months. The counter-terrorism measures being taken are multidimensional and do not simply focus on law enforcement aspects. Education, poverty alleviation and development are key to the counter-terrorism strategy of the Chinese government.”

Xinjiang‘s regional government invited diplomatic envoys as well as representatives from Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, India, Pakistan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Afghanistan, Thailand and Kuwait following reports about detention of thousands of Uighur and other Muslims in massive education camps.

The UN‘s Geneva-based Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination last year said that it was alarmed by “numerous reports of ethnic Uighurs and other Muslim minorities” being detained in Xinjiang region and called for their immediate release. Estimates about them “range from tens of thousands to upwards of a million,” it had said.

China defended the camps, saying they are re-education camps aimed at de-radicalising sections of the Uighur population from extremism and separatism. The US and several other countries besides UN officials have expressed concern over the camps.

China has been carrying out massive crackdown on the East Turkistan Islamic Movement (ETIM) in Xinjiang province, where Uighurs who formed majority in the region were restive over the increasing settlements of Han community.

Pakistan and several other Muslim countries faced criticism about their silence over China‘s crackdown on Muslims in Xinjiang. China has about 20 million Muslims who are mostly Uighurs, an ethnic group of Turkic origin, and Hui Muslims, who are of Chinese ethnic origin. While Uighurs lived in Xinjiang, bordering Pakistan-occupied Kashmir, Hui Muslims resided in Ningxia province.

A recent report in the Global Times said China passed a five-year plan to “sinicise Islam” in a bid to make it compatible with its version of socialism. “This is China‘s important act to explore ways of governing religion in modern countries,” the report said.

Baloch said the delegation was given full and open access to the three centres that they visited in Kashgar and Hotan. “The training program includes teaching of national common language (Chinese), law and constitution and vocational skills. The students also participate in recreational activities like sports, music and dance. We witnessed several skill classes being offered in these centres,” she said. “During the visits to these centres, we had the opportunity to interact with both the management and the students. We observed the students to be in good physical health. The living facilities are fairly modern and comfortable with separate dormitories for men and women. They are being served halal food.”

She said the Uighur language is being used in official establishments, airports, subway stations, police stations or hotels. “Even the copies of the Koran that we saw in the mosques and the Islamic centre were translated into the Uighur language. The most visible sign of protection of Uighur culture by the government is the government-run bilingual kindergarten schools where children learn Putonghua as well as the Uighur language and culture from a very young age.”


2019-04-17 on antiwar-orig

“Between April 3 and 12, the democracy financing branch of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) paid for a Ukrainian opinion survey formulated by the Gallup Organization. The International Republican Institute (IRI) of Washington, DC, an association of the Republican Party also funded by USAID and the State Department, sponsored the polling and published the results on April 24. Full report: http://www.kiis.com.ua/?lan…

According to the report, the poll sampling was 1,200 and the procedure was “face-to-face interviews at respondents’ home.” The response rate recorded was 65%. That means that 35% of front doors were slammed shut in the face of the pollsters. Whether that happened before or after the pollsters disclosed they were paid by the US Government is not known. No regional breakdown is reported for the non-responders.

When regional distributions are reported for opinions towards Russian military intervention, constitutional change, intention to vote in the May 25 presidential election, or preference for candidates, those refusing to express a view from the eastern and southern regions ranged between 9% to 12%, two to four times more than those from western Ukraine. The proportion who said they wouldn’t vote in the proposed election, or refused to say, was 39%.

In short, the US poll managed not to record the resistance to participating in the election of a near-majority of Ukrainians in the east and south.

The question on Russian intervention in the Ukrainian survey was worded differently by the American poll. The latter asked: “Do you support the decision of the Russian Federation to send its army into Ukraine under the pretext of protecting Russian-speaking citizens?”

The Russian Federation, of course, did not send its army into Ukraine.

http://johnhelmer.net/?p=10640


2019-04-17 on greanville-post

America is what it always was–a republic for the well-to-do.


2019-04-10 on ceprnet

They give the same treatment to China’s economy: it must be failing! It must!


2019-04-10 on ceprnet

Wonderful summary. Thanks for the explanation


2019-04-07 on greanville-post

Be of good cheer! Next year every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health- and old age care.

500,000,000 urban Chinese will have more net worth and disposable income than the average American, their mothers and infants will be less likely to die in childbirth, their children will graduate from high school three years ahead of American kids.

Then there will be more drug addicts, suicides and executions, more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.

Then people will start noticing…


2019-04-05 on greanville-post

For once, our president* got it right, “People say you don’t like China. No, I love them. But their leaders are much smarter than our leaders. And we can’t sustain ourselves with that. It’s like taking the New England Patriots and Tom Brady and having them play your high school football team.”

Chinese officials are recruited from the top 2% of university graduates, which means that all of them have IQs over 130.

By the time they reach Beijing they have PhDs (Xi’s dissertation was on rural marketization), 25 years experience running Fortune 500 companies, provinces of 100 million people, and universities.

They have plans for 5, 15, 35 and 100 years and work on realizing their goals every day. Like the Patriots on steroids.

*https://www.boston.com/spor…


2019-04-02 on russiainsider

What is the source for this rumor? The author provides none.


2019-04-01 on checkpoint-asia

There’s no such thing as a growth rate. It’s an acceleration rate.

Here’s why the conflation is misleading:

Multiplying the acceleration rate of China’s 2008 economy (9.7%) by its GDP ($10 Tn) tells us its growth: $0.97 Tn.

Multiplying the acceleration rate of China’s 2018 economy (6.6%) by its GDP ($24 Tn) tells us its growth: $1.6 Tn.

Since China’s population is unchanged in that decade, we can see that growth in 2018 was twice 2008’s, even though the acceleration rate back then was higher.


2019-04-01 on wsws

I think we should leave that to the Thais. Let them study successful growth models from other countries and choose one that suits them


2019-04-01 on wsws

This is a naive interpretation of the situation in Thailand, a developing country entirely unsuited to faux democracy (it’s just factionalism).

That kind of ‘democracy’ has been a consistent disaster in Thailand as it has everywhere.


2019-03-27 on lowyinterpreter

“Roggeveen is right to flag that the government needs to “take the public with them” in the struggle against foreign influence.

Neither the Australian Government nor the Australian people have ever struggled against foreign influence. They’ve actively courted it, in fact.

All our banks are foreign owned, as are our media. Our universities’s China departments are firmly under the thumb of the US State Department. Our cabinet members regularly spill the beans to the American ambassador and We are besotted with a Hollywood version of a benign America.

The current campaign against China was clearly orchestrated by the US, panicking because it has fallen behind China in every social, moral, scientific and economic metric.

If that sounds odd, consider this: next year there will be more drug addicts, suicides and executions, more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.

To my ears, that looks like ‘game over.’


2019-03-22 on sic-semper-tyrannis

Shoigu is a standout in a high quality team: best central banker, best diplomat, best president in the world. Speaks well of the NKVD school: they trained Putin in personnel assessment.


2019-03-20 on greanville-post

Right on!

China’s economy is 30% bigger, growing three times faster and rests on manufacturing capacity twice as big as ours.

Fleets win battles but economies win wars.


2019-03-19 on greanville-post

Paul Craig Roberts, paleoconservative economist, Wall Street Journal editor and Reagan appointee, agrees.

His analysis of the phenomenon is here: The Difficulty of Writing for Americans. Paul Craig Roberts

https://www.paulcraigrobert…


2019-03-19 on wsws

‘ Having become the world’s second largest economy, ‘?

Even the CIA ranks China’s economy first in the world, followed by the EU and the US. China’s economy is 30% bigger than America’s and growing three times faster. Fleets win battles but economies win wars.


2019-03-18 on wsws

At the other end of the Eurasian Continent, in Shanghai all school heads are provided with cars and drivers and teachers are forbidden to spend more than 15 hours weekly giving classroom instruction.

One result: Chinese kids are graduating high school three years ahead of ours in the STEM subjects.


2019-03-12 on russiainsider

The Spanish officer corps quietly mutinied in Iraq over US killing of civilians. Spain withdrew its forces weeks later.


2019-03-12 on wsws

Adjusted for purchasing power, China now invests four times more in R&D than the US, having reached parity in 2010.

Does it make sense for to the US compete with China? It might be possible if China were as our media has portrayed it, but what if that ‘China’ does not exist?

What if China is not repressive, extractive or authoritarian?

What if its government is wildly popular, its democracy flourishing (under Jimmy Carter’s oversight since 2002), it’s ahead in education, science, technology and weaponry–and its people have more money than Americans? What then?

And what if its economy is thirty percent bigger and growing three times faster–because it is.


2019-03-11 on russiainsider

“China is well known for denying visas to overly critical and/or hostile journalists”. Is there any country that does not do this? The US and UK are standouts but their media are dominant so we rarely hear about it.

“Western media seems to write far fewer calumnies against China than against Russia”. That’s because Western corporations are more trade- and profit-dependent on China than on Russia.


2019-03-11 on sic-semper-tyrannis

In the absence of a moral filter, says Martha Stout[1], “Politicians are more likely than people in the general population to be sociopaths…That a small minority of human beings literally have no conscience was and is a bitter pill for our society to swallow–but it does explain a great many things, shamelessly deceitful political behavior being one.”

My study of Chinese government revealed an important truth–one that explains much about that country’s rapid rise: they find our amateur, promise-driven, personality-based governance repulsive. They would no more vote for amateur politicians than for amateur brain surgeons. To them charm, good looks, quick wits and rhetorical skill signify shallowness, instability and glibness. Altruistic politicians have been fundamental to Chinese governance for two millennia.

Their political stars have always been experienced, scholarly, altruistic problem-solvers chosen on merit after decades of testing.

In 1000 AD, during our Dark Ages, with just one scholar-official for every eight thousand citizens, China was harmonious, technologically advanced and prosperous. Emperors and dynasties came and went while loyal, disciplined–often courageous–civil servants lived far from family, serving in remote regions under terrible conditions.

Confucius'[2] moral meritocracy and the rigors of the job discouraged sociopaths and officials integrity, efficiency and entrepreneurial energy made China the most advanced civilization on earth.

So highly do the Chinese esteem their best politicians that they deified one whose legacy, a water diversion project, has repaid its capital investment every twenty-four hours for 2,270 years. Millions visit his shrine, which is built overlooking his masterpiece, every year to offer incense and sincere thanks.

The altruistic tradition is remembered in a Singapore Government White Paper, “The concept of government by honorable men who have a duty to do right for the people and who have their trust and respect fits us better than the Western idea that government power should be as limited as possible.”

And would-be members of China’s Communist Party take an oath to “Bear the people’s difficulties before the people and enjoy their fruits of their labors after the people”. They often fail, obviously, but at least they’ve got something to shoot for–and a standard that the other 1.3 billion non-members can hold them to.

[1] The Sociopath Next Door, by Martha Stout Ph.D.
[2] The Doctrine of the Mean


2019-03-06 on lowyinterpreter

Anyone interested in why ‘a nation that prides itself on landing astronauts on the Moon’ can’t even get into orbit these days might enjoy reading ‘Wagging the Moondoggie’ at http://centerforaninformeda…


2019-03-06 on bruegel

‘autocracies have a relative advantage when dealing with President Trump compared to countries respecting the rule of law.’?

So the leader of an autocratic power would have the sole power to:
– Declare war. Frequently.
–Issue 300,000 national security letters (administrative subpoenas with gag orders that enjoin recipients from ever divulging they’ve been served);
–Control information at all times under his National Security and Emergency Preparedness Communications Functions.
–Torture, kidnap and kill anyone, anywhere, at will.

And would limit personal freedom by
–Secretly banning 50,000 citizens from flying and refusing explanations.
–Imprisoning 2,000,000 citizens witout trial.
–Executing 2,000 citizens each year prior to arrest.

Since China does none of those things and America does all of them, which has an autocratic government?

And which is more likely to be trusted by its own people?
<img src=”https://i.imgur.com/Q7lSFGK.jpg” title=”source: imgur.com”/>


2019-03-06 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Can anyone provide a link to a deep investigation of that failed coup? The NYT is, um, not totally forthcoming.


2019-03-02 on wsws

One night in 2010 a Shanghai high-rise fire killed fifty-eight people.

The Minister of Public Security arrived from Beijing at two a.m. and, by dawn, had coordinated twenty-five fire stations and a hundred fire trucks, a thousand firefighters, police, hospitals, finance, insurance, housing, donations, counseling, criminal investigations and the local school district.

Forty-eight hours later, state-owned insurers began compensating families for lost property and $250,000 for each death.

A week later Shanghai mayor Han Zheng admitted, ”We are responsible for poor supervision of the city’s construction industry which caused the fire.”

He implemented new building codes, fired or demoted thirty officials, of whom twenty-two were indicted and most went to prison, two for sixteen years.


2019-03-01 on theaviationist

‘Several factors must be taken into consideration: pilot skills; support from other assets (including fighters and AEW aircraft), ground radars, etc.’

Among the etc., presumably, is the actual weapon. The aircraft are only platforms, after all, and advanced weapons are still formidable even when carried by obsolete aircraft.


2019-02-26 on infoproc

This just in: Understanding public support for eugenic policies: Results from survey data

L.J.Zigerell

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.s… rights and content

Highlights
Nontrivial support for eugenic policies was found in an MTurk survey sample.
Eugenic policy support associated with heritability perceptions.
Eugenic policy support associated with attitudes about a targeted group.
Abstract

Little published empirical research has investigated public support for eugenic policies. To add to this literature, a survey on attitudes about eugenic policies was conducted of participants from Amazon Mechanical Turk who indicated residence in the United States (N > 400). Survey items assessed the levels and correlates of support for policies that, among other things, encourage lower levels of reproduction among the poor, the unintelligent, and people who have committed serious crimes and encourage higher levels of reproduction among the wealthy and the intelligent. Analyses of responses indicated nontrivial support for most of the eugenic policies asked about, such as at least 40% support for policies encouraging lower levels of reproduction among poor people, unintelligent people, and people who have committed serious crimes. Support for the eugenic policies often associated with feelings about the target group and with the perceived heritability of the distinguishing trait of the target group. To the extent that this latter association reflects a causal effect of perceived heritability, increased genetic attributions among the public might produce increased public support for eugenic policies and increase the probability that such policies are employed


2019-02-26 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

When China’s takeoff began its industrial base was dwarfed by Belgium’s, its people were starving to death in tens of millions and it was under the most severe embargoes–food, agricultural equipment, technology, finance, international recognition–ever known.


2019-02-25 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Is your knowledge innate? Were you born with it? Is that why you can so readily dismiss serious investigators?

My skepticism has two sources:

1. Two of my staff are Cambodians in their late 40s who speak warmly of Pol Pot as a true nationalist and passionate environmentalist. They’re mystified by my talk of mass killings. I have asked others here in Thailand and they’re equally baffled.

2. The other is the American trick of blanketing the world (thanks to our total media control, including search engines that block access to studies like Chomsky’s) with atrocity stories about governments they dislike. My favorite atrocity story is the famous (but nonexistent) massacre of peaceful, democracy-loving students in Tiananmen Square in 1989 when there was no massacre and there were no demands for democracy.

Meanwhile, our media observe a disciplined silence about the fact that our own regime has, on average, killed 1,000 civilians every day since 1945. Quite an achievement, don’t you think?


2019-02-25 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

There is massive doubt that the KR committed genocide. Refute Chomsky and Herman, who have devoted more time to investigating the matter than everyone else combined, not me.

Start here: Distortions at Fourth Hand by Noam Chomsky & Edward S. Herman. The Nation, June 6, 1977. https://chomsky.info/19770625/


2019-02-25 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

The worst genocide in recent history was the US bombing of Cambodia.

Between October 4, 1965 and August 15, 1973, US Air Force B-52 bombers made Cambodia one the most heavily bombed nation in history: 2,756,941 tons’ worth, dropped in 230,516 sorties on 113,716 sites. Just over 10 percent of this bombing was indiscriminate, with 3,580 of the sites listed as having “unknown” targets and another 8,238 sites having no target listed at all. The database also shows that the bombing began four years earlier than is widely believed — not under Nixon, but under Lyndon Johnson. The impact of this bombing, the subject of much debate for the past three decades, is now clearer than ever. Civilian casualties in Cambodia drove an enraged populace into the arms of an insurgency that had enjoyed relatively little support until the bombing began, setting in motion the expansion of the Vietnam War deeper into Cambodia., a coup d’état in 1970, the rapid rise of the Khmer Rouge, and ultimately the Cambodian genocide.

There’s a great deal of nonsense in our media about Cambodia, especially the atrocity figures. You can see Noam Chomsky analyze them here: https://youtu.be/f3IUU59B6lw.


2019-02-24 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

China’s invasion of Vietnam was pre-announced, done at the behest of Singapore and with the full support of the USA and the USSR–in defense of Cambodia, which Vietnam was invading, and with which China had a defense treaty: a very different matter from meddling in other countries’ affairs.


2019-02-24 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Learn to read. I said, “No-one will end up banning Huawei”.

As President Trump has indicated, the US will withdraw its ban within 90 days and the three dwarfs will quickly follow suit.

Precisely for the reasons I gave.


2019-02-23 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

No-one will end up banning Huawei simply because it’s the only company in the world that manufactures all the elements of an advanced 5G network and can assemble them at scale and cost. (Huawei uses 90 Apple patents while Apple uses 790 Huawei patents).

Non-Huawei customers must integrate more costly, less functional, less compatible and less upgradeable elements, pay twice as much, take twice as long to implement 5G and experience inferior service because Huawei produces every element of 5G systems and assembles turnkey networks–from antennas to the power stations needed to operate them to chips, servers and handsets–at scale and cost.

It is literally unrivaled in enhanced mobile broadband.


2019-02-23 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

By ‘documented’ you mean ‘alleged’?

If it’s documented, please provide links.


2019-02-23 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

‘China had no problems with supplying Afghan mujaheddin with weapons and materiel’.

Sources please–especially when you allege that China broke a fundamental promise that it made to the world–not to interfere in other countries’ internal affairs and to deal only with the UN recognized governments.


2019-02-22 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Exactly. The Chinese may be the only one that still occupies the same land and has continuous, written history for 3,000 years and whose culture is based on a single ideology.


2019-02-22 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

I’d say it’s the only surviving civilization.

Do you know of another?


2019-02-21 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

‘economy which boomed initially primarily thanks to Western (a lot of it American) wealth and technology transfers in 1980s-2000s, can not exist without, however stupid the arrangement is, American market.’

Get a grip! China’s economy under Mao enjoyed the fastest takeoff in history, despite Western embargoes.

Starting with an industrial base smaller than that of Belgium’s in the 50s, the China that for so long was ridiculed as “the sick man of Asia” emerged at the end of the Mao period as one of the six largest industrial producers in the world.

National income grew five-fold over the 25-year period 1952-78, increasing from 60 billion to over 300 billion yuan, with industry accounting for most of the growth. On a per capita basis, the index of national income (at constant prices) increased from 100 in 1949 (and 160 in 1952) to 217 in 1957 and 440 in 1978.

Over the last two decades of the Maoist era, from 1957 to 1975, China’s national income increased by 63 percent on a per capita basis during this period of rapid population growth, more than doubling overall and the basic foundations for modern industrialism were laid and outpacing every other development takeoff in history.

In Germany the rate of economic growth 1880-1914 was 33 percent per decade.

In Japan from 1874-1929 the rate was 43 percent.

The Soviet Union over the period 1928-58 the rate was 54 percent.

In China over the years 1952-72 the decadal rate was 64 percent.

Bear in mind that, save for limited Soviet aid in the 1950s, repaid in full and with interest by 1966, Mao’s industrialization proceeded without benefit of foreign loans or investments–under punitive embargoes the entire 25 years–yet Mao was unique among developing country leaders in being able to claim an economy burdened by neither foreign debt nor internal inflation.

Without Mao’s industrial revolution, the economic reformers of the post-Mao era would have had little to reform because the higher yields obtained on individual family farms during later years would not have been possible without the vast irrigation and flood-control projects–dams, irrigation works and river dikes–constructed by collectivized peasants in the 1950s and 1960s.

By some key social and demographic indicators, China compared favorably even with middle income countries whose per capita GDP was five times greater. By 1974 China was producing jet aircraft, locomotives, oceangoing ships, ICBMs, hydrogen bombs and satellites and Mao had reunited, reimagined, reformed and revitalized the largest, oldest civilization on earth, modernized it after a century of failed modernizations, liberated more women than anyone in history and ended thousands of years of famine.

Despite the West’s crushing, twenty-five year embargo on food, finance, technology, medical and agricultural equipment and exclusion from the family of nations, Mao had banished the invaders, bandits and warlords, eliminated serious crime and drug addiction, doubled the population and its life expectancy, raised literacy to eighty-four percent, liberated China’s women, educated its girls, erased wealth disparity, restored the infrastructure, kept China debt-free, grew the economy twice as fast as America’s–and started two revolutions of his own choosing.

Even according to figures released by the Deng Xiaoping regime, industrial production increased by 11.2% per year from 1952-1976 (by 10% a year during the alleged catastrophe of the Cultural Revolution). In 1952 industry was 36% of gross value of national output in China. By 1975 industry was 72% and agriculture was 28%. It is quite obvious that Mao’s supposedly disastrous socialist economic policies paved the way for the rapid (but inegalitarian and unbalanced) economic development of the post-Mao era.8

In his very readable Mao Zedong: A Political and Intellectual Portrait, Maurice Meisner lays it out in detail


2019-02-20 on russiainsider

Chill. Chinese IQ is 105 (vs our wobbly 100) and destined to max out at 108 within 20 years.

They currently have 300,000 folks with 160+ IQ (to our 10,000) so they’ll be able to take up and bear the white man’s burden for at least another century.


2019-02-19 on infoproc

The key to development in East Asia is North Korea. Once it is integrated and the oil and gas pipelines and rail lines hooked up, the region will take off.


2019-02-18 on wsws

A remarkably naive take on labor in China.

Chinese workers cost their employers more than American workers, when adjusted for productivity and benefits. Chinese workers’ rights and benefits far exceed Americans’ also.

Thanks to the ACFTU, for the 34th. year in succession, Chinese workers’ real wages rose faster than GDP: 7.6% on average and 8.8% for factory workers in 2018.

Anecdotes from Western government fronts like the China Labour Bulletin are meaningless. Workers’ support for the government is at an all-time high.


2019-02-18 on wsws

Developments in Zimbabwe cannot be fully understood without an insight into the country’s colonial history and the bilateral dispute between Zimbabwe and the United Kingdom arising from the land question.

It may be recalled that between 1890 and 1920, British settlers, who constituted less than 2% of the population, assisted by the British Expeditionary Force, seized at gunpoint more than 75% of the best arable land, while more than 98% of the population were forcibly confined to less than 24% of the land, which was also located in the most marginal and least productive ecological regions of the country. During the same period, more than 250,000 head of cattle were forcibly looted and transferred from African into British settler hands. No compensation was ever paid to the African people for the looted cattle and seized land.

It is therefore not surprising that land ranked highest among the grievances that motivated the indigenous black majority to launch the Second Chimurenga, which culminated in Zimbabwe’s independence in 1980 at the human cost of over 50,000 lives. The land question dominated the talks at the Lancaster House Conference in 1979, which were deadlocked for three weeks over the land issue and almost collapsed until undertakings were made by the British and American governments to fund Zimbabwe’s land reform programme.

Many will recall that during our struggle for independence, Zimbabwe’s liberation movements were portrayed in very negative terms in the western media. In fact, they were referred to as “terrorists”. However, all this changed in 1980 when President Mugabe won the British organised elections and extended the hand of reconciliation to all his former adversaries who never reciprocated. Throughout the 1980’s and most of the 1990’s Zimbabwe was held up as a shining example of a successful, stable, prosperous, democratic and well governed African country. But all this changed when Zimbabwe started to vigorously address this most burning national grievance which had fuelled the liberation war but still remained unresolved well into the 1990’s. The land ownership pattern had hardly changed. It was therefore part of the outstanding items of the decolonisation agenda. It was therefore not surprising that the same negative and hostile media that characterised Zimbabwe’s liberation war as a “terrorist” war now characterised every step taken to redress the historic injustices relating to land ownership as constituting a violation of human rights, a negation of democracy and contrary to the rule of law. Yet the original dispossession, at gunpoint, of the black majority was never regarded as inhuman, undemocratic or unjust.

Between 1980 and 1996, the British government provided £40 million for land reform. By way of comparison, the British government had in the 1960’s paid out £200 million to resolve the land question in Kenya. To Zimbabweans, who in 1976 and 1977 had been told by the British under the Anglo-American proposals that about US $2 billion was needed to do the job properly, and considering Lord Carrington’s statement in 1979 that costs for resolving the land question in Zimbabwe “would be very substantial indeed, well beyond the capacity of any individual donor country”, the provision of £40 million was paltry and pathetically inadequate. Indeed, until four years ago, the land situation was almost exactly as it was under colonial rule. Some 4,000 families out of a population of some 13 million still controlled some 75% of the productive land in Zimbabwe. Of this land, less than 20% was being utilised. This meant that over 80% of the prime land in Zimbabwe was un- or under-utilised, making Zimbabwe’s large scale commercial agriculture land utilisation the most inefficient in the world.

In 1996 Conservative Prime Minister John Major, sent a mission to Zimbabwe to evaluate the position after the £40 million provided under Mrs Margaret Thatcher had been exhausted. The Mission reported good progress to Mr Major and recommended that further funding be given to Zimbabwe to complete the land reform programme. But in the 1997 general elections in the UK, Mr Major’s Conservative Party lost to Mr Tony Blair’s New Labour.

When the Government of Zimbabwe approached the new Labour Government of Mr Tony Blair to finalise the discussions initiated during Mr Major’s government, it received a thunderbolt from London. The new Labour Government in 1997 totally rejected Britain’s Lancaster House commitments to assist Zimbabwe with land reform. Ms Clare Short, the newly appointed Secretary of State for International Development, in a letter dated 5 November 1997 to the Government of Zimbabwe, wrote:

“I should make it clear that we do not accept that Britain has a special responsibility to meet the costs of land purchase in Zimbabwe. We are a new government from diverse backgrounds without links to former colonial interests. My own origins are Irish and as you know we were colonised not colonisers.”

This was shooting from the hip and could not have been more unfortunate as it coincided with growing restlessness among landless Zimbabweans. Starting in Marondera, the Svosve community, led by their traditional chiefs and spiritual leaders, moved onto unutilised portions of farms in 1997/1998, as a result of their frustration at the slow pace of land reform. These were not war veterans, or ruling party activists but, peasant communities led by their traditional and spiritual leaders. Aware of this rising tide of frustration, the Government of Zimbabwe, under the framework of the Land Acquisition Act (1992) had already started conducting extensive negotiations with all stakeholders, including the white commercial farmers, to come up with the necessary criteria for land acquisition, which were agreed as follows:

Derelict land

Under-utilised land

Land owned by absentee landlords

Land from farmers with more than one farm or with oversized farms (defined according to what is sustainable under given ecological conditions)

And land adjacent to communal areas. (However, if this was the only farm in his possession and if the farmer wanted to continue farming, he would be offered another farm).

On the basis of this agreed criteria, the Government of Zimbabwe in 1997 legally designated for acquisition nearly 1,500 white owned farms for resettlement of landless peasants. This provoked the wrath of the United Kingdom, which proceeded to mobilise its allies in Europe, America, Australia and New Zealand against Zimbabwe. Considering the vested interests affected by that decision to empower the black people of Zimbabwe, the British Government reaction was predictable. It must not be forgotten that the dispossession of Africans during colonial times empowered the colonisers, and any reversal was therefore bound to meet resistance. After all, the land register revealed that some of the political and economic heavy weights connected to the British establishment, owned large tracts of land in Zimbabwe as absentee landlords. This was in addition to the 4,000 white farmers, mainly of British extraction, who owned more than 75% of the best arable land in Zimbabwe, a country of 13 million people. Whilst there was never an outcry over the violation of human and property rights of the indigenous blacks by the white settlers, the British authorities suddenly became the champions of human rights now that their colonial injustices were being corrected and perceived their kith and kin as losing their colonial heritage of white privileges. The black majority, who were the victims of settler pillage, were now being portrayed as the villains.

After efforts to engage in dialogue with the British Government had failed, Zimbabwe decided to appeal to the wider international community for assistance. The Zimbabwe Government therefore convened a Land Donors’ Conference in Harare in September 1998, where donors made pledges to fund an Inception Phase that was to be implemented within 18 to 24 months. This would have been followed by a more comprehensive 5 year programme. However, and largely because of British opposition, which was aimed at making land reform a slow and evolutionary process, none of the pledges made by the donors were ever honoured. Most of these donors now publicly claim that they could not support the land reform programme due to “land invasions” even though the so-called “land invasions” did not start in earnest until March 2000, well after the agreed Inception Phase should have been completed.

Faced with this situation, the Government of Zimbabwe in 2000 amended the Constitution to enable it to compulsorily acquire land for resettlement paying full compensation for improvements on all acquired land. Compensation for the value of the land itself was to be paid by the British Government who had seized the land without compensation from the original owners. Over the last four years under the “Fast Track” Resettlement Programme, the Government of Zimbabwe has therefore implemented its policy of one farmer one farm regardless of race or creed. As a result, all those who owned more than one farm have had to give up the rest for redistribution and have been compensated according to the law. Each farm has had to conform to the stipulated maximum farm sizes according to ecological region so as to eliminate the land under-utilisation of the colonial era. Accordingly, all oversized farms have been sub-divided into the appropriate sizes as stipulated by law.

As a result, over 220,000 hitherto landless families have been allocated land since July 2000. Those white commercial farmers who cooperated with the land reform programme by agreeing to have their over-sized farms to be sub-divided continue to farm on virtually the same land they were utilizing before the onset of the Land Reform Programme. As we speak, more than 1,500 white farmers are co-existing with the new black farmers. This is consistent with the Government’s policy, which stipulates that no one who is committed to farming will be left without land. Those farmers who reacted emotionally and refused to share the land by having their oversized farms reduced to the legal limits naturally lost their farms. However, many are now coming back seeking land in accordance with the provisions of the land reform programme.

The Fast Track Programme has empowered the people by giving them access to the most vital of all resources: land. It is on the land that the indigenisation of the economy shall be built. It is on the land that surplus capital shall be generated for investment in industry, mining and commerce. To achieve this objective, the Government of Zimbabwe has set aside considerable resources to provide the new farmers with all round support by way of inputs such as seed packs, fertilisers, chemicals, tillage and a comprehensive range of extension services – all of which are vital for increased agricultural productivity. It has already been demonstrated that smallholder farmers can be a major force in commercial agricultural production if they are given access to land and the necessary support in the form of finance, infrastructure and extension services. Between 1980 and 1990, maize output from that sector rose from 35% to 63% of total national production, while its share in cotton production increased from 26% to 70%. This was achieved on marginal land. Now that they are on prime land, coupled with the support they are receiving from the Government, there is every reason to be confident that Zimbabwe’s agriculture-driven economy is poised for sustainable growth. This will have to be in the context of heavy investment in dam construction and water resources development which the Government is vigorously pursuing in response to persistent droughts which have plagued the country and the region since 2000.

The land reform programme has been carried out in accordance with the laws and Constitution of Zimbabwe. Yet the Government of the United Kingdom has left no stone unturned in its efforts to argue otherwise. It has spared none of its considerable resources to derail this programme and perpetuate the historic injustices inflicted upon the people of Zimbabwe over the 100 years of colonial dispossession. The British Government, in a bid to squirm out of direct dialogue with Zimbabwe on the core land question, and in a vicious effort to isolate Zimbabwe and subject it to economic strangulation, has mounted a frantic world wide campaign accusing Zimbabwe of violating human rights, the rule of law and democratic principles. Because of kith and kin connections, the UK Government has successfully mobilised its Anglo-Saxon constituency in Australia, Canada and New Zealand as well as the United States and the European Union to also make the same allegations and impose economic sanctions against Zimbabwe.

Zimbabwe and the rest of the international community totally reject these baseless allegations, which are just being used as a smokescreen to cover for the real agenda of achieving regime change in Zimbabwe so as to reverse the land reform programme. On the allegations of human rights, no one, not even the British Government, has ever come forward to say whose rights have been violated. The British Government and its allies have consistently failed in their desire to get the United Nations Human Rights Commission and the United Nations General Assembly to condemn Zimbabwe for the alleged human rights violations. In any case, the British Government’s own record in the area of human rights, both at home and abroad, has not been exemplary. Yet it continues to falsely lecture Zimbabwe on human rights violations.

On the issue of democracy, Zimbabwe has been a democratic country since it overthrew British Colonial rule through armed struggle in 1980. It regularly holds elections in accordance with its Constitution and has so far held five parliamentary elections in 1980, 1985, 1990, 1995, and 2000. None of these elections, including the parliamentary elections in 2000, were ever judged to have been not free and not fair. Even the European Union and the Commonwealth passed the 2000 Parliamentary Elections as having been free and fair. Both the EU and the Commonwealth Observer Groups particularly commended the integrity and transparency of the voting process in the 2000 Parliamentary elections.

The Commonwealth Observer Group qualified the 2002 Presidential Elections not on the basis of what they observed during their four-week stay in Zimbabwe but on the basis of what they said they had been told by the opposition MDC as having happened before their arrival. They actually commended the integrity of the voting process, its thoroughness and its transparency as well as its peacefulness during the four weeks they were in Zimbabwe. The leaders of the UK, Australia, Canada and New Zealand, whose nationals dominated the Commonwealth Observer Group, had long pronounced that the elections would only be free and fair if the ruling party lost. Needless to say, it was the same leaders who appointed these nationals to join the observer group with the connivance of the Commonwealth Secretary General, a white commercial farmer from New Zealand.

The Commonwealth Observer Group’s report was contradicted by fifteen other observer groups. All the other observer groups found the elections to have been free and fair. Yet the Commonwealth Observer Group’s report, which was clearly in the minority, was seized upon by the British Government and its allies to condemn Zimbabwe. As a result, Zimbabwe was suspended from the Councils of the Commonwealth because the white members of the Club flexed their political and economic and diplomatic muscles. Zimbabwe subsequently withdrew from the Commonwealth on 7 December 2003.

Zimbabwe will be holding its sixth Parliamentary Elections on 31 March 2005. As in the 2000 Parliamentary and 2002 Presidential Elections, we have already seen attempts by the British Government and its allies as well as their political lackeys in Zimbabwe to pre-judge the elections on 31 March 2005 and declare them to be not free and not fair even before they have been held. Zimbabwe totally rejects these attempts to interfere with its elections and undermine its independence and sovereignty. Zimbabwe is capable of running its own elections, having successfully brought democracy and organised five Parliamentary and two Presidential Elections. Full implementation of the SADC principles and guidelines through the enactment of the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission Act and the Electoral Act, by Parliamentary Consensus last year has further enriched Zimbabwe’s democratic processes. The two Acts paved the way for the creation of an independent Electoral Commission and an Electoral Court, respectively. Zimbabwe, it is worth noting, is the only country in the SADC region which has incorporated the SADC guidelines on democratic elections into its laws.

The Government of Zimbabwe has invited 40 countries, (some like South Africa, sending three observer teams) and 6 international observer groups, including the United Nations, the Southern Africa Development Community, the African Union, the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa, the Non Aligned Movement and the Caribbean Community to witness the elections. Some of the observers have already arrived and have expressed their satisfaction with the arrangements for the elections as well as the atmosphere of peace and democratic even-handedness prevailing in the country.

On 18 April 2005 Zimbabweans will be celebrating 25 years of independence from British colonial rule and domination. It will be a time for Zimbabweans to celebrate and reflect on the achievements made since 1980 in a number of areas, especially education, health and economic empowerment of the black majority. In the area of education, Zimbabwe’s literacy rate is now 94%, the highest in Africa and certainly one of the highest in the world, chiefly because of the Government’s heavy investment in education over the last 25 years. Where at independence in 1980 primary school enrolment stood at a paltry 800,000 pupils and secondary education was reserved for less than 12% of the population, today there is universal primary and secondary education. Similar investment in tertiary education has seen the number of teacher training colleges rising from 4 in 1980 to 15 at present, while the number of universities offering degree programmes have also increased from 1 to 13 during the same period.

The Government has similarly invested in health. At independence in 1980 there were only 4 referral hospitals located in the two major cities of Harare and Bulawayo to service the country’s entire population. Of the two hospitals in Harare, one was reserved for whites while the other served black people. The same situation prevailed in Bulawayo. The Government has now built hospitals in each of the eight provinces and established clinics and health centres in all districts. Now every Zimbabwean is within walking distance of a clinic or a health centre.

The Government also introduced programmes to empower the black majority who were previously excluded from meaningful participation in the economy. I have already talked about the land reform programme, which has seen over 220,000 families being empowered through land redistribution. Empowerment programmes have also been extended to areas such as the financial sector, mining, tourism, and the construction industry. However, it is in these economic sectors that the next phase of the liberation struggle is set to be fought. This no doubt will be the fourth Chimurenga. –Zimbabwean Ambassador in London, His Excellency Cde Simbarashe Mumbengegwi. London, March 2005


2019-02-11 on wsws

The kids made two mistakes: taking funding and ‘advice’ from Western Labor NGOs and being clueless about the actual state of labor in China.

China has the highest union participation on earth and the most effective by far: they’ve seen real wages double every decade for 50 years and working conditions, like vacations and pensions, surpass America’s.

The Chinese Government learned a great deal from China’s early experiments with communism and are pacing themselves accordingly. The trends are their friends, the country is firing on all cylinders so, as Xi’s goals demonstrate, they’re approaching communism one step at a time.

By 2021, the first centenary of the Party’s founding, every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care. On that day there will be more drug addicts, suicides and executions, more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China. 450,000,000 urban Chinese will have more net worth and disposable income than the average American, their mothers and infants will be less likely to die in childbirth, their children will graduate from high school three years ahead of–and outlive–American kids.

By 2035 Manufacturing will reach ‘an intermediate level among world manufacturing powers,’ with greatly improved ability to make key breakthroughs and ‘significantly increase overall competitiveness.’

By the PRC’s centenary in 2049 China expects to ‘lead the world’s manufacturing powers, with the capability to lead innovation and possess competitive advantages in major manufacturing areas, and will develop advanced technology and industrial systems. This will afford a GINI and QOL comparable to Finland’s–for every Chinese.

It is hoped that the Social Credit program will help create a more emotionally mature, trustworthy and responsible society (though China is already very trusting) that makes full Communism possible 2121.

As Mao said, “The Communist Party of China is no longer a child or a lad in his teens but has become an adult. When a man reaches old age, he will die, and the same holds true of a party..For the working class, the laboring people and the Communist Party the question is not one of being overthrown but of working hard to create the conditions in which classes, state power and political parties will die out very naturally and mankind enters the realm of Great Harmony, dàtóng.”[1].

When you realize how much work must be done between now and then, you can understand why the Party want everyone to stay on the same page.

[1] ON THE PEOPLE’S DEMOCRATIC DICTATORSHIP. In Commemoration of the Twenty-eighth Anniversary of the Communist Party of China. June 30, 1949


2019-02-07 on wsws

“After initially denying the existence of the detention camps, Beijing, in the face of the escalating propaganda campaign by the US and its allies, now claims that the camps are vocational centres”.

That’s because they’re vocational centers.

Eleven Muslim countries sent inspectors to Xinjiang last month and they said they were ‘envious’ of the vocational centers there.

Anyone who knows about China’s treatment of her 38 minorities knows that they get better, not worse, treatment than the Han majority. Illiterate, rural muslim youths need to learn to read and write, tell right from wrong and how to get and hold down a job.

Of course, the government could have thrown them into jail as most countries do, but that would be stupid and shortsighted and the Chinese government is neither.


2019-01-30 on greanville-post

America has killed 1,000 foreign civilians every day since 1945, in addition to executing 1,000 of its citizens annually, without trial and imprisoning 2,000,000–also without trial–not to mention assassinating its own citizens, like Anwar al Awlaki and his children (also without trial) for their beliefs. Who are we kidding here?

*https://www.globalresearch….


2019-01-21 on wsws

“Chinese elites having $trillions of loot stolen from Chinese working people stashed in the West tactically in fear of losing it,”?

Erm, sometime between 2020-2025 every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care. On that day there will be more drug addicts, suicides and executions, more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China. 450,000,000 urban Chinese will have more net worth and disposable income than the average American, their mothers and infants will be less likely to die in childbirth, their children will graduate from high school three years ahead of–and outlive–American kids.

That doesn’t leave much loot to steal, does it?


2019-01-17 on chinalawblog

By 2030 Chinese researchers, who currently author 55% of America’s STEM papers, will be publishing from China, increasing that country’s existing lead.

Our economy will be one-third of China’s and we will be ten years behind in 5G applications. We are doomed to financial, scientific and technological irrelevance.


2019-01-12 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Let’s leave it at this: the Chinese do not overstate.


2019-01-12 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Even more hilarious is the fact that you cannot find a single example of Chinese overstatement.


2019-01-12 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

One direct, official quote will suffice. Just one.


2019-01-12 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

“Chinese do tend to overstate own capability”.

Can you provide an example of such Chinese overstatement?


2019-01-11 on chinalawblog

There’s no ‘downturn’ in China’s economy. Real wages grew 8.8% in 2018.


2019-01-07 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

The OECD’s PISA tests showed that Shanghai was top of the international education rankings but it was unclear whether Shanghai and another chart-topper, Hong Kong, were unrepresentative regional showcases. The OECD’s Andreas Schleicher says pupils in other parts of China are also performing strongly.

“Even in rural areas and in disadvantaged environments, you see a remarkable performance.”In particular, he said the test results showed the “resilience” of pupils to succeed despite tough backgrounds – and the “high levels of equity” between rich and poor pupils.

“Shanghai is an exceptional case – and the results there are close to what I expected. But what surprised me more were the results from poor provinces that came out really well. The levels of resilience are just incredible. Mr Schleicher is confident of the robustness of this outline view of China’s education standards.

In an attempt to get a representative picture, tests were taken in nine provinces, including poor, middle-income and wealthier regions. http://www.bbc.com/news/bus…


2019-01-07 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

China is a minor infringer of IP compared, say, to South Korea. Bill Gertz’s books, “Betrayal: How the Clinton Administration Undermined American Security and ”The China Threat: How the People’s Republic Targets America” tell how the Clinton/Gore Administration transferred cutting edge nuclear, military and other technology from classified status to Commerce and then openly sold the technology to China. GE transferred its aerospace and its imaging IP to China in exchange for market access, and GE is just the tip of the iceberg. All were short-term decisions now coming back to haunt us.

To check the record, start at the US premier venue for IP cases, the Federal Court’s Northern District of California, where most complainants will file suits against Chinese entities. A database of Intellectual Property Cases can be found here: dockets.justia.com/browse/c….

For the WTO’s international forum for Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, TRIPS, start here: http://www.wto.org/english/…

For Chinese IP court filings and decisions is here: chinaipr.com/category/beiji… is currently suing Qualcomm in this court and you can follow the proceedings online).


2019-01-07 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

I warmly recommend Ray Dalio’s new article on China: https://www.linkedin.com/pu…


2019-01-07 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Academic Carsten Holz(HKU) agrees with investor Mark Mobius that China’s stats are as good as Canada’s.
There’s no case of Chinese government stats being disproven or even shown to be misleading. China, for ideological reasons, understates her GDP and is slowly harmonizing them with world norms in preparation for joining the OECD.


2018-12-30 on wsws

“The CCP represents the interests the super-wealthy oligarchs who have been profiting from the processes of capitalist restoration since 1978 and is well aware that it is sitting on top of a social time bomb”.

Get a grip. Sometime between 2020-2025 every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care. On that day there will be more drug addicts, suicides and executions, more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.

By 2021, 450,000,000 urban Chinese will have more net worth and disposable income than the average American, their mothers and infants will be less likely to die in childbirth, their children will graduate from high school three years ahead of–and outlive–American kids.

And China’s GINI is dropping fast, too, as we would expect when the bottom decile is raised.


2018-12-30 on wsws

Across the world, people prefer that their governments, not private parties, handle censorship.


2018-12-20 on wsws

“The Beijing regime is no doubt authoritarian, representing as it does the capitalist oligarchy that emerged from the Stalinist bureaucracy’s restoration of capitalism in the People’s Republic.”

If so, we could use a similar oligarchy here. Sometime between 2020-2025 every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care. On that day there will be more drug addicts, suicides and executions, more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.

By 2021, 450,000,000 urban Chinese will have more net worth and disposable income than the average American, their mothers and infants will be less likely to die in childbirth, their children will graduate from high school three years ahead of–and outlive–American kids.

That’s my kind of capitalist oligarchy!


2018-12-19 on middleeasteye

If there’s one thing worse than American weapons proliferation it’s Chinese weapons proliferation!

Seriously?


2018-12-18 on wsws

“The Chinese economy is slowing sharply”?

It’s not slowing at all, it’s accelerating.

Its acceleration rate may fall from 6.6% to 6.5% but that’s temporary.

Wages rose 8.8% in 2018 and the economy is on track to be twice as big as America’s by 2030.


2018-12-17 on sic-semper-tyrannis

“Mr. Soros was named as a global threat (along with Bin Ladin and Pablo Escobar) in a very often overlooked and more often misunderstood book by the Chinese senior colonels Wang and Xiansui titled Unrestricted Warfare”

They knew whereof they spake. Mr. Soros financed the Tiananmen uprising through his Beijing based Fund for the Reform and Opening of China, which the government shut down after an enquiry revealed its role.

Details here: http://www.unz.com/article/…


2018-12-17 on antiwar-orig

“Between April 3 and 12, the democracy financing branch of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) paid for a Ukrainian opinion survey. The questionnaire was formulated by the Gallup Organization. The International Republican Institute (IRI) of Washington, DC, an association of the Republican Party also funded by USAID and the State Department, sponsored the polling and published the resultson April 24. The full report can be read here. http://www.kiis.com.ua/?lan…

According to the report, the poll sampling was 1,200 and the procedure was “face-to-face interviews at respondents’ home.” The response rate recorded was 65%. That means that 35% of front doors were slammed shut in the face of the pollsters. Whether that happened before or after the pollsters disclosed they were paid by the US Government is not known. No regional breakdown is reported for the non-responders.

When regional distributions are reported for opinions towards Russian military intervention, constitutional change, intention to vote in the May 25 presidential election, or preference for candidates, those refusing to express a view from the eastern and southern regions ranged between 9% to 12%, two to four times more than those from western Ukraine. The proportion who said they wouldn’t vote in the proposed election, or refused to say, was 39%. In short, the US poll managed not to record the resistance to participating in the election of a near-majority of Ukrainians in the east and south.

The question on Russian intervention in the Ukrainian survey was worded differently by the American poll. The latter asked: “Do you support the decision of the Russian Federation to send its army into Ukraine under the pretext of protecting Russian-speaking citizens?”

http://johnhelmer.net/?p=10640.


2018-12-15 on androidauthority

“I’ve tried to get to the bottom of security issues with Huawei, but the exact secrets have never quite been revealed”. Allow me.

The US calls Huawei a ‘security risk’ for a funny reason: it uses an encryption system that prevents the NSA from intercepting its communications. A number of governments and secret services in the non-Western world (think Germany) have begun to equip themselves exclusively with Huawei equipment to protect the confidentiality of their communications. Convincing Cisco or a U.S. company to leave back doors in their equipment is quite simple: you can always threaten the management or board of these companies with some tax investigation or over other shady activities. That is not so easy when the company is Chinese.

A further threat is Huawei’s technology. It owns moref 5G IP than Qualcom, has much more advanced chips than Qualcom, and will launch its new 5G handset more than a year before Apple–giving it first mover advantage in establishing a developer base for hundreds of new industries that 5G makes possible.

It’s launching into the world’s most advanced cellphone environment: 5G requires 5x times more cell sites than 4G and China has built 350,000 cell sites since 2015 while the US has built fewer than 30,000 (Deloitte). It will be five years before the US reaches that level of saturation and, until then, 5G won’t be a national system.

5G is far less important to end users than to industry, commerce and transportation. “We’re talking about billions of devices on the same network, not just millions,” said Dan Littmann, a principal at Deloitte. “First-adopter countries embracing 5G could sustain more than a decade of competitive advantage.”

Think of the apps, the printable RF identifiers, machine controls, automobiles and all the many processes that low latency alone will make possible.

2020 is also opening day for Xiongan New Area, a new city of 3 million, sixty miles from Beijing, that is currently being wired for 5G: no traffic lights, mostly autonomous vehicles (I’m not making this up) connected to the capital by a 120 mph maglev line that costs the same to build and operate as regular subways but is silent, fast, and has no moving parts. A literal city of the future and a showcase for Chinese technology.

China’s current five-year economic plan, which runs through 2020, has budgeted $400 billion for 5G investment alone and 5G is currently operating in Beijing, Tianjin, Qingdao, Hangzhou, Nanjing, Wuhan, Guiyang, Chengdu, Shenzhen, Fuzhou, Zhengzhou, and Shenyang whose populations combined approach the population of the USA.


2018-12-15 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

I haven’t come across any. In the West there’s a distinct lack of interest in Russian and Chinese exploits of any kind, and even less about their military campaigns in the East. Btw, Mao told Marshall that he’d gladly put the Red Army under his command to fight the Japanese..


2018-12-15 on wsws

China’s economy is slowing down. It’s doubling in size every decade and growing three times faster than America’s. Figures like 6.7% are measures of acceleration, not growth.

Multiplying the acceleration rate of China’s 2008 economy (9.7%) by its GDP ($10 Tn) tells us its growth: $0.97 Tn. Multiplying the acceleration rate of China’s 2018 economy (6.6%) by its GDP ($24 Tn) tells us its growth: $1.6 Tn. Since China’s population is unchanged in that decade, we can see that growth in 2018 was twice 2008’s, even though the acceleration rate back then was higher.


2018-12-15 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

The ‘magnificent victory in the Pacific during WW II’ was made possible by Russia, who twice annihilated Japanese land forces each larger than the combined forces the US faced in the Pacific. And while China was fighting 1.5 million Japanese, of course.


2018-12-13 on aoldefense

Those are unsupported allegations.


2018-12-13 on aoldefense

I’ve been trying to earn my fellow Americans about China for 20 years and have often wondered why they can’t get a grip on reality.


2018-12-13 on aoldefense

Can you provide us with an example* of a Chinese abrogation of its WTO commitments? One will be sufficient.

Or why 51% ownership does not accord with its legal rights?

Or of any significant IP that China stole?

Or are you just venting?

*an example is not an allegation, btw, its a proven case in an international forum.


2018-12-12 on aoldefense

Hmmm. China has fully honored all of its WTO commitments since its accession while the US has not.

According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb.

Chinese technology (and deployment) leads the world all fields of civil engineering, all fields of sustainable and renewable energy, manufacturing, supercomputing, speech recognition, graphenics, thorium power, pebble bed reactors, genomics, thermal power generation, quantum communication networks, ASW missiles, in-orbit satellite refueling, passive array radar, metamaterials, hyperspectral imaging, nanotechnology, UHV electricity transmission, HSR, speech recognition, radiotelescopy, hypersonic weapons, satellite quantum communications, quantum secure direct communications, quantum controls,.. “Approximately 72% of the academic patent families published in QIT since 2012 have been from Chinese universities. US universities are a distant second with 12%.” (Patintformatics. https://patinformatics.com/….

China has overtaken the US to become the world’s largest producer of scientific research papers, making up almost a fifth of the total global output, according to a major new report. https://www.stm-assoc.org/d…

An incentive by the Chinese government to create 42 “world-class” universities by 2050 has led to major investment in the country’s research programs since 2015, with a focus on science and engineering subjects in particular.

Let’s be friends.


2018-12-12 on wsws

Australia is at war with its own help. Yet more Aussies trust Xi Jinping than trust ScoMo. Funny, innit?


2018-12-10 on greanville-post

Excellent summary. Thanks. Here’s something for your scrapbook:

Syria IRAQ MISSILE CRISIS

“It was touch and go, just as risky as the Cuban missile crisis of 1962. The chances for total war were high, as the steely wills of America and Eurasia had crossed in the Eastern Mediterranean. The most dramatic event of September 2013 was the high-noon stand-off near the Levantine shore, with five US destroyers pointing their Tomahawks towards Damascus and facing them – the Russian flotilla of eleven ships led by the carrier-killer Missile Cruiser Moskva and supported by Chinese warships. Apparently, two missiles were launched towards the Syrian coast, and both failed to reach their destination. (We shall return to these two missiles later)….

And now back to those two missiles of 2013. They were sent by the Israelis, whether they were trying to jump-start the shoot-out or just observed the clouds, as they claim. The missiles never reached its destination, shot down by the Russian ship-based sea-to-air defence system, or perhaps rendered useless by Russian GPS jammers….The Cape of Good Hope.


2018-12-09 on greanville-post

Why does the US accuse Huawei of being a security threat? Huawei uses a system of encryption that prevents the NSA from intercepting its communications. A number of governments and secret services in the non-Western world have begun to equip themselves exclusively with Huawei materials, and are doing so to protect the confidentiality of their communications.

Convincing Cisco or some other U.S. company to leave back doors in their equipment is quite simple. One can always threaten the management or board of these companies with some tax investigation or over other shady activities. That is not so easy when the company is hosted in China.


2018-12-08 on wsws

One night in 2010 a fire broke out in a Shanghai high-rise.

By dawn, the government had coordinated twenty-five fire stations and a hundred fire trucks, a thousand firefighters, police, hospitals, finance, housing, donations, counseling, criminal investigations and alerted the school district.

Forty-eight hours later, state-owned insurers compensated families for lost property and dispensed $250,000 checks for each of sixty deaths.

A week later, Shanghai Mayor Han Zheng told the press, “Our poor supervision of the city’s construction industry caused the fire”. They city implemented new building codes, fired or demoted thirty officials and sent twenty-two to prison, two for sixteen years


2018-12-08 on wsws

The heart of the problem is that Huawei uses a system of encryption that prevents the NSA from intercepting its communications. A number of governments and secret services in the non-Western world have begun to equip themselves exclusively with Huawei materials, and are doing so to protect the confidentiality of their communications.

Convincing Cisco or some other U.S. company to leave back doors in their equipment is quite simple. One can always threaten the management or board of these companies with some tax investigation or over other shady activities. That is not so easy when the company is hosted in China.

It requires the NSA and others to use more expensive efforts to reach their aim: The National Security Agency breached Huawei servers years ago in an effort to investigate its operations and its ties to Chinese security agencies and the military, and to create back doors so the National Security Agency could roam in networks around the globe wherever Huawei equipment was used.

The covers/excuses for this war are theft of intellectual property or in the alternative, trade with Iran and North Korea, and violating rules of competition by benefitting from national subsidies.


2018-12-08 on middleeasteye

Who cares about clout. Pretty is where it’s at (at least that’s what Doris Lessing says)


2018-12-06 on greanville-post

“The huge Chinese economy, which played an important role in boosting world trade and economic growth, is slowing sharply”? Nonsense.

China’s economy is accelerating at light speed: it’s one-third bigger than America’s yet is doubling every ten years.

Please don’t fall into the MSM trap of calling this a ‘growth’ rate.

There’s no such thing as a growth rate. It’s an acceleration rate.

Here’s why the conflation is misleading:

Multiplying the acceleration rate of China’s 2008 economy (9.7%) by its GDP ($10 Tn) tells us its growth: $0.97 Tn.

Multiplying the acceleration rate of China’s 2018 economy (6.6%) by its GDP ($24 Tn) tells us its growth: $1.6 Tn.

Since China’s population is unchanged in that decade, we can see that growth in 2018 was twice 2008’s, even though the acceleration rate back then was higher.


2018-12-06 on russiainsider

” Putin’s vindictiveness in dealing with some political opponents”??

Putin’s Vindictiveness? In 2011 President Obama ordered the execution of Anwar al Awlaki, an American citizen, for preaching Wahabbist extremism and separately executed his sixteen-year-old son and eight-year-old daughter separately, all without trial.


2018-12-06 on dezeenhq

“In China, there’s a very authoritarian regime”. By virtue of where I live, I consider myself an expert on authoritarian regimes and, for a regime to be considered authoritarian it requires as a minimum:

– warrantless surveillance of private phone and email conversations by the NSA;
– SWAT team raiding homes;
– shootings of unarmed citizens by police;
– harsh punishment of schoolchildren in the name of zero tolerance;
– endless wars;
– out-of-control spending;
– militarised police;
–roadside strip searches;
– roving TSA sweeps;
– privatised prisons with a profit incentive for jailing Americans;
– fusion centres that collect and disseminate data on citizens’ private transactions;
– militarised agencies with stockpiles of ammunition

No Chinese leader, including Mao, has ever had one such power. The United States President has and exercises all of them. Regularly.


2018-12-04 on greanville-post

Typo in: ‘The existing evidence from China is that if even if just the cost-of-living differences’ an excess ‘if’


2018-12-03 on greanville-post

Great article. Many thanks for the clarification.


2018-12-02 on greanville-post

Sometime between 2020-2025 every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care. On that day there will be more drug addicts, suicides and executions, more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.

By 2021, 450,000,000 urban Chinese will have more net worth and disposable income than the average American, their mothers and infants will be less likely to die in childbirth, their children will graduate from high school three years ahead of–and outlive–American kids.

As Kishore Mahbubani, former President, UN Security Council, says, “The key question the West must ask is: how was the relative over-performance of Western societies in the second half of the 20th century replaced by underperformance in the 21st century? The answer will not come from looking at China. It will come from looking in the mirror”.


2018-11-28 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

“it seems at least Chinese are trying to fashion themselves into US 2.0 in the post-American world”? Only in Western media. In China the Chinese are trying to fashion themselves into a xiaokang society by 2021.


2018-11-26 on foreignpolicyjournal

Minority Chinese in North America can only learn Mandarin as a second language. They can
speak Chinese in Chinatowns but, otherwise, theymust speak the mainstream language, English.
The same is true for Uygurs in Xinjiang and for most minorities in most countries.


2018-11-23 on lowyinterpreter

Readers might benefit from knowing three facts:

1. China has the highest labor union participation and membership in the world.

2. Chinese union members have doubled their wages every decade for 40 years.

3. Chinese union members received an average raise in 2018 of 8.8%

If it ain’t broken, why fix it?


2018-11-21 on wsws

Much poorer China has built 24 million homes since 2015 and, by 2021, every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care.

On that day there will be more suicides and executions, and more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.


2018-11-20 on ceprnet

Nonsense. Bill Gates himself thanked the Chinese government for ending Windows piracy. Said he wished the US was as cooperative.

China manufactures most of the ingredients and many of the finished pharmaceuticals consumed in the US.


2018-11-16 on middleeasteye

Ms. Mohammad should be grateful she’s not American. In 2011 President Obama ordered the execution of Anwar al Awlaki, an American citizen, for preaching Wahabbist extremism and separately executed his sixteen-year-old son and eight-year-old daughter separately, all without trial.

A Chinese friend, Xiao Zhang, writes, “I have a friend who just came back from Xinjiang and he has visited some of the reeducation camps and talked with people there. And he told me that Uighurs really received vocational education inside, not kidding, and cannot get out until completion of courses. The government in Xinjiang simply kept all the potential “trouble makers” they could find in detention based on the reports they received from various sources, among which reports from communites make up a major part. The government has known for years that poor-educated, impoverished and umployed people are more easily to be radicalized. Now they take actions to ensure they won’t make troubles. This is another example of Chinese style of government behaviour, just like one-child policy. You may hold good intentions, but you cannot force people to be good”.


2018-11-14 on ceprnet

China’s debt burden is one third of America’s or the EU’s, even though all three have the same debt-to-GDP ratios. China’s debt fragilities are over-stated. They don’t threaten the model. In real life, corporate net debt is near zero, private savings are $3 trillion, foreign reserves $3 trillion. The proof is in the numbers. Not just headline growth, but stable and low inflation, strong wage growth and rising tax revenue

The debt is of high quality and growth is rapid enough to wipe it out in good time.


2018-11-14 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

U.S. Growing Dependent On Russia For Satellite Propulsion Systems. https://forbes.com/sites/lo…


2018-11-13 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

“if not for the United States China would have never become what she is today”?

For almost half its existence, the PRC thrived under sanctions and embargoes far more draconian than Trump’s. The US was never a major factor in Chinese development.

Mao, who bore the weight of embargoes that extended to finance and grain, started with an industrial base smaller than that of Belgium’s in the 50s, the China that for so long was ridiculed as “the sick man of Asia” emerged at the end of the Mao period as one of the six largest industrial producers in the world.

National income grew five-fold over the 25-year period 1952-78, increasing from 60 billion to over 300 billion yuan, with industry accounting for most of the growth. On a per capita basis, the index of national income (at constant prices) increased from 100 in 1949 (and 160 in 1952) to 217 in 1957 and 440 in 1978.

Over the last two decades of the Maoist era, from 1957 to 1975, China’s national income increased by 63 percent on a per capita basis during this period of rapid population growth, more than doubling overall and the basic foundations for modern industrialism were laid and outpacing every other development takeoff in history.

In Germany the rate of economic growth 1880-1914 was 33 percent per decade.
In Japan from 1874-1929 the rate was 43 percent.
The Soviet Union over the period 1928-58 the rate was 54 percent.
In China over the years 1952-72 the decadal rate was 64 percent.

The US was and remains a paper tiger, as the rising life expectancy under grain-embargoed China shows (it will surpass ours by 2030)


2018-11-12 on petroleum-economist

There was nothing unequal about the China -Malaysia agreements. Mahathir was grandstanding and will go ahead with them next year.

Hambantota, like all new ports, is a long term project in a volatile and corrupt country. It will be booming in ten years, like all China projects.


2018-11-12 on foreignpolicyjournal

“China’s policymakers mistakenly assume that their country can be pro-Palestine and pro-Israel at once”??

A very Manichean interpretation of China’s policy of non-interference in other countries’ internal affairs.

China is the only honest broker on planet earth.


2018-11-12 on foreignpolicyjournal

The Chinese Uyghurs should be glad they’re not American citizens. For preaching the same kind of Wahabbist extremism, in 2011 President Obama ordered the execution of Anwar al Awlaki, an American extremist preacher and separately executed al Awlaki, his sixteen-year-old son and eight-year-old daughter, without trial.

Two of the four Uyghur Great Horses claimed to be nobles, descendants of a Mo- hammedan aristocracy which sometimes played a decisive role in the history of China’s Northwest. The brothers Ma, like many Moslems in China, had Turkish blood in them.

As early as the sixth century a race which we now know as the Turks had become powerful enough on China’s northwest frontier to make important demands on the monarchs of the plains. In a couple of centuries they had built up an empire extending from eastern Siberia across part of Mongolia and into Central Asia.

Gradually they filtered southward, and by the seventh century their Great Khan was received almost as an equal at the Court of Yang Ti, last Emperor of the Sui Dynasty. It was this same Turkish Khan who helped the half-Turkish General Li Yuan overthrow the Emperor Yang Ti and establish the celebrated T’ang Dynasty, which for three centuries reigned over Eastern Asia from Ch’ang An (now Sianfu)—then perhaps the most cultured capital on earth. Mohammedan mosques had already been built in Canton by seafaring Arab traders before the middle of the seventh century.

With the advent of the tolerant T’ang power the religion rapidly penetrated by land routes through the Turks of the Northwest. Mullahs, traders, embassies, and warriors brought it from Persia, Arabia, and Turkestan, and the T’ang emperors formed close ties with the caliphates to the west.

Especially in the ninth century, when vast hordes of Ouigour Turks (whose great leader Seljuk had not yet been born) were summoned to the aid of the T’ang Court to suppress rebellion, Islamism entrenched itself in China. Following their success, many of the Ouigours were rewarded with titles and great estates and settled in the Northwest and in Szechuan and Yunnan. Over a period of centuries the Mohammedans stoutly resisted Chinese absorption, but gradually lost their Turkish culture, adopted much that was Chinese, and became more or less submissive to Chinese law.

Yet in the nineteenth century they were still powerful enough to make two great bids for power: one when Tu Wei-hsiu for a time set up a kingdom in Yunnan and proclaimed himself Sultan Suleiman; and the last, in 1864, when Mohammedans seized control of all the Northwest and even invaded Hupeh. The latter rebellion was put down after a campaign lasting eleven years. At that time of waning Manchu power the able Chinese General Tso Tsung-t’ang as-tounded the world by recapturing Hupeh, Shensi, Kansu, and eastern Tibet, finally leading his victorious army across the desert roads of Turkestan, where he re-established Chinese power on that far frontier in Central Asia. Since then no single leader had been able to unite the Moslems of China in a successful struggle for independence, but there had been sporadic uprisings against Chinese rule, with savage and bloody massacres on both sides.

The most serious recent rebellion occurred in 1928, when General Feng Yu-hsiang was warlord of the Northwest. It was under Feng that the Wu-Ma, or “Five Ma,”1 combination acquired much of its influence and secured the nucleus of its present wealth and power. Although theoretically the Chinese considered the Hui or Moslem people one of the five great races of China.t most Chinese seemed to deny Moslem racial separateness, claiming that they had been Sinicized.

In practice, the Kuomintang decidedly followed a policy of ab- sorption, even more direct (though perhaps less successful) than that pursued toward the Mongols. The Chinese official attitude toward the Mohammedans seemed to be that they were a “religious minority” but not a “national minority” However, it was quite evident to any- one who saw them in their own domain in the Northwest that their claims to racial unity and the right to nationhood as a people were not without substantial basis in fact and history. The Mohammedans of China were said to number about 20,000,000, and of these at least half were concentrated in the prov- inces of Shensi, Kansu, Ninghsia, Szechuan, Chinghai, and Sinkiang. In many districts—particularly in Kansu and Chinghai—they were a majority, and in some large areas outnumbered Chinese as much as ten to one. Generally their religious orthodoxy seemed to vary according to their strength of numbers in a given spot, but in the predominantly Mohammedan region of northern Kansu and southern Ninghsia the atmosphere was distinctly that of an Islamic country.

It could be said that the Mohammedans were the largest community left in China among whom religious leaders were the real arbiters of temporal as well as spiritual life, with religion a deciding factor in their culture, politics, and economy. Mohammedan society revolved round the menhuang and the ahun (emir and mullah), and their knowledge of the Koran and of Turkish or Arabic (scant as it usually was) provided the sources of authority. Mohammedans in the North-west prayed daily in the hundreds of well-kept mosques, observed Mohammedan feast days, fast days, and marriage and funeral ceremonies, rejected pork, and were offended by the presence of pigs and dogs. The pilgrimage to Mecca was an ambition frequently realized by rich men and ahuns, who thereby strengthened their political and economic power.

To many of them pan-Islamism rather than pan-Hanism was an ideal. Chinese cultural influence was nevertheless very marked. Moslems dressed like Chinese (except for round white caps or ceremonial fezzes worn by the men and white turbans by the women) and all spoke Chinese as the language of daily life (although many knew a few words from the Koran). While markedly Turkish features were common among them, the physiognomy of the majority was hardly distinguishable from that of the Chinese, with whom they had for centuries intermarried. Because of their law that any Chinese who married a Mohammedan must not only adopt the faith but also be adopted into a Mohammedan family, cutting away from his or her own kinsmen, the children of mixed marriages tended to grow up regarding them- selves as a species different from their Chinese relatives. The struggle of three sects among the Chinese Moslems somewhat weakened their unity, and created a convenient alignment for the Chinese Communists to work among them. The three sects were simply the Old, New, and Modern schools.

Old and New had formed a kind of “united front” of their own to oppose the heretical Modern school. The latter nominally advocated giving up many of the cere- monies and customs of Mohammedanism and embracing “science,” but its real objectives were evidently to destroy the temporal power of the mullahs, which the Four Mas found inconvenient. Since it was supported by the Kuomintang, many Mohammedans believed the, Modern school aimed at a so-called “pan-Hanism”—absorption of the national minorities by the Chinese. In the Northwest the Four Mas were leaders of the Modern school. Around them they grouped their own satellites, bureaucrats, and wealthy landowners and cattle barons upon whom their regime depended. And yet the Great Horses were not precisely the men one would expect to lead a reform movement in religion. Take Ma Hung-kuei, probably the richest and strongest of the guar- Communist work among the Mohammedans had begun several years before in the Northwest. Early in 1936, when the Red Army moved across Ninghsia and Kansu toward the Yellow River, van- guards of young Moslems were already propagandizing among the Ninghsia troops, urging the overthrow of the “Kuomintang running- dog” and “traitor to Mohammedanism,” Ma Hung-kuei—and some had lost their heads for it.

These were the main promises the Reds made to them:
To abolish all surtaxes.
To help form an autonomous Mohammedan government.
To prohibit conscription.
To cancel old debts and loans.
To protect Mohammedan culture.
To guarantee religious freedom of all sects.
To help create and arm an anti-Japanese Mohammedan army.
To help unite the Mohammedans of China, Outer Mongolia, Sinkiang, and Soviet Russia.

Here, presumably, was something to appeal to nearly every Moslem. Even some of the ahuns reportedly saw in it an opportunity to get rid of Ma Hung-kuei (punishing him for burning the mosques of the Old and New schools), and also a chance to realize an old aspiration—to reestablish direct contact with Turkey through Central Asia. By May, the Communists were claiming that they had achieved what skeptics had said was impossible. They boasted that they had created the nucleus of a Chinese Moslem Red Army.


2018-11-11 on russiainsider

‘Russia’s action was aggressive and illegal,’. Rubbish. It was neither.

Whatever passed between Russia and Ukraine in 1954, it was not sovereignty over Crimea. The Union States did not have sovereignty over the autonomous bodies within them. The USSR had sovereignty over both of them. According to the Constitution the Supreme Soviet would determine the fate of the autonomies if a state seceded.

USSR Law of Secession: “The people residing in the autonomies are given a right to independently decide whether to remain in the Soviet Union or in the seceding Republic as well as to decide on their state legal status.”

Crimean Referendum Jan. 20, 1991: “Do you support re-establishing the Crimean Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic as a subject of the Union SSR and a participant of the Union Treaty?”

— 94.3% yes —


2018-11-09 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

‘In the end, one has to operate with reliable data, not propaganda cliches’.

No. Typically, one does not. Otherwise, most of those fallen empires would not have fallen.

The US has blinded itself: after three generations of BS, most people actually believe it and, apparently, are willing to do so until the bitter end.

Yet ordinary people are not fooled. Look at the 10:1 level of trust between Chinese citizens and their (usually accurate, if boring) media and our feeling about our media.



2018-11-02 on wsws

Cracks in the regime? Give me a fucking break! China is under attack from all angles, especially from Western media, so there’s no need to amplify their bullshit. Here’s a sample of their prognosticatory powers:

1990. The Economist. China’s economy has come to a halt.

1996. The Economist. China’s economy will face a hard landing

1998. The Economist: China’s economy dangerous period of sluggish growth.

1999. Bank of Canada: Likelihood of a hard landing for the Chinese economy.

2000. Chicago Tribune: China currency move nails hard landing risk coffin.

2001. Wilbanks, Smith & Thomas: hard landing in China.

2002. Westchester University: China Seeks a Soft Economic Landing

2003. New York Times: Banking crisis imperils China

2004. The Economist: The great fall of China?

2005. Nouriel Roubini: The Risk of a Hard Landing in China

2006. International Economy: Can China chieve a Soft Landing?

2007. TIME: Can China avoid a hard landing?

2008. Forbes: Hard Landing In China?

2009. Fortune: China’s hard landing. China must find a way to recover.

2010: Nouriel Roubini: Hard landing coming in China.

2011: Business Insider: Chinese Hard Landing Closer Than You Think

2012: A American Interest: Economic News from China: Hard Landing

2013: Zero Hedge: Hard Landing In China

2014. CNBC: hard landing in China.

2015. Forbes: Congratulations, You Got Yourself Chinese Hard Landing.

2016. The Economist: Hard landing looms for China

2017. National Interest: Is China’s Economy Going To Crash?

2018. The Daily Reckoning: China’s Coming Financial Meltdown


2018-11-02 on wsws

Yet Australia will sign the RCEP agreement this month-another nail in the hegemony’s coffin. The rats–and Oz is as dirty a little rat as there is–are deserting the ship.


2018-11-01 on infoproc

The only comprehensive (though not in-depth) study of the ‘millions starved to death (though no-one saw them)’ is this: http://www.unz.com/article/….


2018-11-01 on infoproc

Navarro’s last peer-reviewed paper:

https://journals.openeditio…

The Economics of the “China Price”
“The China price”(…) the three scariest words in US industry. Cut your price at least 30% or lose your customers. Nearly every manufacturer is vulnerable — from furniture to networking gear. The result: a massive shift in economic power is underway. –Business Week

Given China’s demonstrated ability to conquer one export market after another, an important question for both would-be competitors and world policy-makers weighing up various protectionist measures is this: How has China been able to emerge as the world’s “factory floor”?The answer lies in the eight major “economic drivers” of the China price:

Low wages,
counterfeiting and piracy,
minimal worker health and safety regulations,
lax environmental regulations and enforcement,
export industry subsidies,
a highly efficient “industrial network clustering”,
the catalytic role of foreign direct investment (FDI),
an undervalued currency.

Seven of these eight factors are nonsense.


2018-11-01 on infoproc

The norm was created by the same folks who tried but failed to create a norm around Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction.

In the latter case, the Internet prevented their succeeding, in the case of the 1961 famine, we had no way of checking their assertions.

Though the US Government did: China’s and Canada’s weather-related harvests were certainly no secret and the US Government, which had embargoed grain shipments to China, assigned the CIA to monitor the embargo’s success. The Agency reported:

“4 April 1961: The Chinese Communist regime is now facing the most serious economic difficulties it has confronted since it concentrated its power over mainland China. As a result of economic mismanagement, and, especially, of two years of unfavorable weather, food production in 1960 was little if any larger than in 1957 at which time there were about 50 million fewer Chinese to feed. Widespread famine does not appear to be at hand, but in some provinces many people are now on a bare subsistence diet and the bitterest suffering lies immediately ahead, in the period before the July harvests. The dislocations caused by the ‘Leap Forward’ and the removal of Soviet technicians have disrupted China’s industrialization program. These difficulties have sharply reduced the rate of economic growth during 1960 and have created a serious balance of payments problem. Public morale, especially in rural areas, is almost certainly at its lowest point since the Communists assumed power, and there have been some instances of open dissidence.

“2 May 1962: The future course of events in Communist China will be shaped largely by three highly unpredictable variables: the wisdom and realism of the leadership, the level of agricultural output, and the nature and extent of foreign economic relations. During the past few years all three variables have worked against China. In 1958 the leadership adopted a series of ill-conceived and extremist economic and social programs; in 1959 there occurred the first of three years of bad crop weather; and in 1960 Soviet economic and technical cooperation was largely suspended. The combination of these three factors has brought economic chaos to the country. Malnutrition is widespread, foreign trade is down and industrial production and development have dropped sharply. No quick recovery from the regime’s economic troubles is in sight”.

Private investigators agreed with the CIA. Ridiculing the Great Leap Forward as ‘The Great Leap Backward,’ Edgar Snow[1] saw no famine, “Were the 1960 calamities actually as severe as reported in Peking, ‘the worst series of disasters since the nineteenth century,’ as Chou En-lai told me? Weather was not the only cause of the disappointing harvest but it was undoubtedly a major cause. With good weather the crops would have been ample; without it, other adverse factors I have cited–some discontent in the communes, bureaucracy, transportation bottlenecks–weighed heavily. Merely from personal observations in 1960 I know that there was no rain in large areas of northern China for 200-300 days. I have mentioned unprecedented floods in central Manchuria where I was marooned in Shenyang for a week..while Northeast China was struck by eleven typhoons–the largest number in fifty years and I saw the Yellow River reduced to a small stream. Throughout 1959-62 many Western press editorials continued referring to ‘mass starvation’ in China and continued citing no supporting facts. As far as I know, no report by any non-Communist visitor to China provides an authentic instance of starvation during this period. Here I am not speaking of food shortages, or lack of surfeit, to which I have made frequent reference, but of people dying of hunger, which is what ‘famine’ connotes to most of us, and what I saw in the past”.

[1] Snow, Edgar. Red Star Over China, Victor Gollancz 1937. p.120


2018-10-30 on infoproc

You’d have to look very, very hard to find an excess death rate–even during the 3-year El Nino famine during which the US slapped on a grain embargo–that matches India’s today.

Mao, by that token, created 400,000,000 excess lives and, while he was at it, doubled their life expectancy and literacy. If you want to delve deeper into it, I recommend http://www.unz.com/article/… https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-10-30 on insidehighered

“Cornell’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations, said that the ILR School had suspended two exchange programs because of concerns that its Chinese partner institution, Renmin University of China, had punished, surveilled or suppressed students who supported workers’ rights in a labor conflict ”

It would be reasonable for Cornell to suspend such programs in Louisiana or New Mexico, but not in China. That’s not how you fight for workers’ rights there.

If you want to fight for the rights of Chinese workers you must first understand that China is the most unionized country on earth. It has more card-carrying union members than the rest of the world combined.

Not only that, but its unions are highly effective: they’ve doubled wages every ten years for the past 40 years and this year wages will rise 8.8%, in constant dollars.

The unions achieved that without the assistance of foreign-supported demonstrations, and achieved so many benefits that, by mid-2021, every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care. On that day there will be more suicides and executions, and more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.

There’s still plenty of work to do but, if Cornell is so hot to help Chinese workers unionize (30% of them are not organized yet) then they should start by helping workers at WalMart China organize the union that WalMart promised them 14 years ago.

Yay! Cornell! Go get WalMart


2018-10-29 on infoproc

How much of an expert can this guy be? “In 1978, China’s infrastructure was almost non-existent”?

Seriously?

Despite all the failings and setbacks, it is an inescapable historical conclusion that the Maoist era was the time of China’s modern industrial revolution.

Starting with an industrial base smaller than that of Belgium’s in the 50s, the China that for so long was ridiculed as “the sick man of Asia” emerged at the end of the Mao period as one of the six largest industrial producers in the world.

National income grew five-fold over the 25-year period 1952-78, increasing from 60 billion to over 300 billion yuan, with industry accounting for most of the growth. On a per capita basis, the index of national income (at constant prices) increased from 100 in 1949 (and 160 in 1952) to 217 in 1957 and 440 in 1978.

Over the last two decades of the Maoist era, from 1957 to 1975, China’s national income increased by 63 percent on a per capita basis during this period of rapid population growth, more than doubling overall and the basic foundations for modern industrialism were laid and outpacing every other development takeoff in history.

In Germany the rate of economic growth 1880-1914 was 33 percent per decade.

In Japan from 1874-1929 the rate was 43 percent.

The Soviet Union over the period 1928-58 the rate was 54 percent.

In China over the years 1952-72 the decadal rate was 64 percent.

Bear in mind that, save for limited Soviet aid in the 1950s, repaid in full and with interest by 1966, Mao’s industrialization proceeded without benefit of foreign loans or investments–under punitive embargoes the entire 25 years–yet Mao was unique among developing country leaders in being able to claim an economy burdened by neither foreign debt nor internal inflation.

Without Mao’s industrial revolution, the economic reformers of the post-Mao era would have had little to reform because the higher yields obtained on individual family farms during later years would not have been possible without the vast irrigation and flood-control projects–dams, irrigation works and river dikes–constructed by collectivized peasants in the 1950s and 1960s.

By some key social and demographic indicators, China compared favorably even with middle income countries whose per capita GDP was five times greater. By 1974 China was producing jet aircraft, locomotives, oceangoing ships, ICBMs, hydrogen bombs and satellites and Mao had reunited, reimagined, reformed and revitalized the largest, oldest civilization on earth, modernized it after a century of failed modernizations, liberated more women than anyone in history and ended thousands of years of famine.

Despite the West’s crushing, twenty-five year embargo on food, finance, technology, medical and agricultural equipment and exclusion from the family of nations, Mao had banished the invaders, bandits and warlords, eliminated serious crime and drug addiction, doubled the population and its life expectancy, raised literacy to eighty-four percent, liberated China’s women, educated its girls, erased wealth disparity, restored the infrastructure, kept China debt-free, grew the economy twice as fast as America’s–and started two revolutions of his own choosing.

In his very readable Mao Zedong: A Political and Intellectual Portrait, Maurice Meisner lays it out in detail.

Mao Zedong: A Political and Intellectual Portrait 1st Edition by Maurice Meisner

[1] “On the People’s Democratic Dictatorship”

[2] John King Fairbank , The United States and China


2018-10-29 on russiainsider

Our mass media were born in the seventeenth century’s Age of Absolutism, as rebellious scandal sheets that sold their opinions and advocacy to the highest bidder.

As commercial franchises, they had literally no responsibility for truth, national wellbeing or the consequences of the feuds they fueled and the wars the espoused. Then and now, arms makers wanted wars, coal miners wanted to sell coal and drug companies wanted the often-fatal effects of their potions denied or diminished.

Censorship–self-imposed, employer-mandated or government-ordered–was ubiquitous then as it was when New York Times Editor John Swinton[1] told the Press Club, “There is no such thing in America as an independent press. You know it and I know it. There is not one of you who dares to write your honest opinions and, if you did, you know beforehand that it would never appear in print. I am paid weekly for keeping my honest opinion out of the paper I am connected with. Others of you are paid similar salaries for similar things and any of you who would be so foolish as to write honest opinions would be out on the streets looking for another job”.

[1] Labor’s Untold Story. Richard O. Boyer and Herbert M. Morais. United Electrical, Radio & Machine Workers of America, NY, 1955/1979.


2018-10-28 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

That’s from my own research, since I have been unable to find a single source that evaluates China’s defensive abilities. There are USNI and RAND studies but they are single-service and quickly outdated.

But here’s a telling quote from defense analyst Michael Thim, “The PLAN had sufficient capabilities in place in 1996 such that sending Carrier Strike Groups into the Taiwan Strait would be suicidal. The situation has only become more challenging for the US Navy in recent years–not because the PLAN has acquired an aircraft carrier of its own–but because China has greatly enhanced and modernized its existing anti-access/area-denial capabilities”.


2018-10-27 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

The Libyans lacked the capacity to destroy every city in America within 45 minutes while simultaneously sinking every ship and downing every USAF aircraft within 500 miles of her border.

China has that capacity. In spades.


2018-10-27 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Perhaps morality in international relations is a very vague concept for everyone and China is not an exception, but moral leadership established domestic moral example–by 2021 by every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care Andy then there will be more suicides and executions, and more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China–is the most fundamental element of Confucius’ instruction on leadership.

And if moral example is insufficient, economic success should tip the scales: by 2021, 450,000,000 urban Chinese will have higher net worth and more disposable income than the average American, their mothers and infants will be less likely to die in childbirth, their children will graduate from high school three years ahead of–and outlive–American kids.

“If you rule with regulations and use laws to bring order, the people will avoid punishment but never develop a sense of shame. If you lead them by virtuous example and bring order by assigning appropriate responsibilities then, in addition to developing a sense of shame, they will order themselves harmoniously because human affairs only prosper in harmony with the moral nature of the cosmos. Superiors and inferiors relate to each other like wind and grass: grass must bend when wind blows over it”.– Analects.

We just haven’t felt the wind yet.



2018-10-27 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Russia has been a traditional, Roman superpower for centuries. China’s superpowerdom was always Confucian, moral, backed by a strong defense, which was only ever breached from within, as a result of factional infighting.

The CCP has made it clear that they seek moral leadership and their first step towards attaining it will occur sometime between 2020-2025, when every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care.

On that day there will be more suicides and executions, and more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.

And by 2021, 450,000,000 urban Chinese will have more net worth and disposable income than the average American, their mothers and infants will be less likely to die in childbirth, their children will graduate from high school three years ahead of–and outlive–American kids.


2018-10-27 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

It was not incapacity to defend herself that brought China down but factional infighting in the Palace. That’s why Xi regularly inveighs against factions.


2018-10-27 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

China brokered the Iran treaty that the US just withdrew from. Iran’s president repeatedly, publicly praised China for making it happen.


2018-10-26 on ghion-journal-1

The most–indeed, only–trusted media in the world are government owned or government regulated. Canadians trust CBC above their commercial channels 3:1, as do Brits with the BBC and Aussies with ABC.

Trust in US media has fallen to 6%, according to the American Press Institute who described it as “lower than the public’s trust in Congress”.

Singapore’s tightly regulated press earns over 70% trustworthiness and China’s state-owned media are trusted by more than 80% of Chinese.


2018-10-23 on wsws

“The CCP, which has presided over four decades of capitalist restoration in China, represents the interests of the wealthy elite that have amassed great riches through the exploitation of, and at the expense of, the working class”??

Say whaaaa? By mid-2021, every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care.

On that day there will be more suicides and more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.

By then 450,000,000 urban Chinese will have more net worth and disposable income than the average American, their mothers and infants will be less likely to die in childbirth, their children will graduate from high school three years ahead of–and outlive–American kids.

That’s what the CCP has been presiding over and, guess what, between 2021-2035, it will preside over bringing China’s GINI down to .25, the same as world champ Finland.


2018-10-22 on wsws

China’s annual growth rate for the third quarter at 6.5 per cent??

Please don’t fall into the MSM trap of calling this a ‘growth’ rate.

There’s no such thing as a growth rate. It’s an acceleration rate.

Here’s why the conflation is misleading:

Multiplying the acceleration rate of China’s 2008 economy (9.7%) by its GDP ($10 Tn) tells us its growth: $0.97 Tn.

Multiplying the acceleration rate of China’s 2018 economy (6.6%) by its GDP ($24 Tn) tells us its growth: $1.6 Tn.

Since China’s population is unchanged in that decade, we can see that growth in 2018 was twice 2008’s, even though the acceleration rate back then was higher.


2018-10-21 on foreignpolicyjournal

The Chinese Uyghurs should be glad they’re not American citizens.

For preaching the same Wahabbist extremism, President Obama ordered the execution of Anwar al Awlaki, an American extremist preacher, in 2011, and separately executed al Awlaki, his sixteen-year-old son and eight-year-old daughter, without trial.

In 2015, China passed its Counter-terrorism Law, which allows Beijing to take all necessary measures to put down any activities or behavior it deems threatening to state security and sovereignty. These threats can be summarized by the oft-recited Chinese goal of ridding itself of “the three evils” – terrorism, separatism and religious extremism. The law was created in response to seven terrorist attacks in China between the start of 2013 and the summer of 2014, five of which were in Xinjiang and all of which were affiliated with the East Turkestan Islamic Movement, which is active in Syria.

BTW: Austria was the first country to realize that the mosques built with Erdogan’s money are used for political purposes to promote his Islamic agenda. In June 2018, Chancellor Sebastian Kurz ordered the closing of seven mosques built by Diyanet, and deported 60 imams and their families with ties to Turkey as part of the ‘fight against political Islam.’


2018-10-18 on russiainsider

Finland’s GINI index score is also the the world’s best, as this article clearly implies.


2018-10-17 on hooverinstitution

In 2011, President Obama ordered the execution of Anwar al Awlaki, an American citizen and islamic preacher and also executed, separately, his sixteen-year-old son and eight-year-old daughter, all without trial.

I feel that the approach taken by Uyghur Shohrat Zakir, chairman of the Government of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region and the person responsible for running the re-education program in Xinjiang, might bear more fruit in the long term than President Obama’s

Here’s what Shohrat Zakir said about the program:

“Currently, Xinjiang has established a training model with professional vocational training institutions as the platform, learning the country’s common language, legal knowledge, vocational skills, along with de-extremization education, as the main content, with achieving employment as the key direction. The vocational training institutions have set up departments of teaching, management, medical care, logistics and security, and allocated a corresponding number of faculty, class advisors, medical, catering, logistics and security staff.

In the process of learning and training, the trainees will advance from learning the country’s common language, to learning legal knowledge and vocational skills. Firstly, the trainees will take learning the country’s common language as the basis to improve their communication abilities, gain modern science knowledge and enhance their understanding of Chinese history, culture and national conditions. The teaching follows standardized plans, textbooks, materials and systems. The trainees are taught in various methods suited to their literacy to raise their abilities to use the country’s common language as soon as possible. Secondly, the learning of legal knowledge is taken as a key part of cultivating the trainees’ awareness of the nation, citizenship and rule of law. Legal experts are hired to lecture on the Constitution, the criminal law and the civil law, etc., and judges, prosecutors and lawyers are invited to teach the criminal law, the law on public security administration, the anti-terrorism law, the marriage law, the education law and Xinjiang’s de-extremization regulations. Thirdly, vocational learning is taken as a key way to help trainees find employment. Courses on clothing and footwear making, food processing, electronic product assembly, typesetting and printing, hairdressing and e-commerce have been set up to suit local social needs and job market. Multi-skill training is provided to trainees who have the desire and capability to learn, so that they acquire one to two vocational skills upon graduation. Businesses in garment making, mobile phone assembly and ethnic cuisine catering are arranged to offer trainees practical opportunities. In the meantime, they are paid basic incomes and a bonus. The mechanism has taken shape in which the trainees can “learn, practice and earn money.”

In daily life, vocational institutions and schools strictly implement the spirit of laws and regulations, including the Constitution and religious affairs regulations, and respect and protect the customs and habits of various ethnic groups and their beliefs in diet and daily life. Faculties of the institutions and schools also try their best to ensure and meet the trainees’ needs in study, life, and entertainment on the basis of free education. The cafeteria prepares nutritious free diets, and the dormitories are fully equipped with radio, TV, air conditioning, bathroom and shower. Indoor and outdoor sports venues for basketball, volleyball and table tennis have been built, along with reading rooms, computer labs, film screening rooms, as well as performance venues such as small auditoriums and open-air stages. Various activities such as contests on speech, writing, dancing, singing and sports are organized. Many trainees have said that they were previously affected by extremist thought and had never participated in such kinds of art and sports activities, and now they have realized that life can be so colorful.

Moreover, the vocational institutions and schools pay high attention to the trainees’ mental health and helped them solve problems in life. They not only provide professional psychological counseling services, but also duly deal with complaints from the trainees and their families. All this shows that the management of the vocational institutions and schools are people-oriented. http://www.xinhuanet.com/en

Some European countries are considering similar ways to integrate these illiterate rural muslims, too. They need help and this is at least an attempt to provide it.

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2018-10-16 on ceprnet

China’s corporate debt is mostly debt between two government departments, a government bank and an SOE. Bookkeeping entries, nothing more.


2018-10-15 on truthdig

Sometime between 2020-2025 every Chinese without exception will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care. On that day there will be more suicides and more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.


2018-10-14 on truthdig

“Today corporations like Apple, Nike and others rely on China’s low-paid nonunion workforce and weak environmental regulations ”

Hardly! China’s union membership is the highest in the world, per capita and absolutely, which is why its workers have doubled their wages every decade for the past 50 years and now cost employers the same as their US counterparts, when adjusted for productivity.

And China’s environmental regulations are much stricter than ours–which is why many environmental offenders are in jail right now.


2018-10-12 on truthdig

” Apple, Nike and others rely on China’s low-paid nonunion workforce and weak environmental regulations ”

I expect Truthdig writers to at least know that China has the highest union membership on earth–per capita and absolutely–and that, as a result, Chinese workers have doubled their real wages every decade for 50 years.

China’s environmental regulations are better than most US states, as is their enforcement.


2018-10-10 on ceprnet

One of those levers is public trust: 95% of Chinese trust their government and that makes it much easier to roll out policies quickly.


2018-10-08 on valuewalkcomments

Programs like Social Credit are unlikely to be embraced by societies whose governments follow Roman rules, our so-called ‘democracies’.

Social Credit, though it will eventually impact non-Chinese businesses, is for people who share the same moral position and have the same civilizational aims. Confucians, in other words.

China is one of the most trusting societies on earth and their unanimous intention is to become even more so. That’s all Social Credit is designed to do.


2018-10-07 on greanville-post

Help is nigh, Andre!

The Voice of China now has full service bureaux in every capital city on earth (and is sharing many of them with RT).

Now it has started hiring journalists. 300 in London, for example, and soon will have thousands around the globe.

Timed to really fire up in mid-2021, when every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care.

On that day there will be more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China.

And to drive the point home, 450,000,000 urban Chinese will have more net worth and disposable income than the average American, their mothers and infants will be less likely to die in childbirth, their children will graduate from high school three years ahead of–and outlive–American kids.


2018-10-03 on sic-semper-tyrannis

Agreed. The Israelis seem bent on self-destruction.


2018-10-02 on sic-semper-tyrannis

The Kurds’ consistently poor strategic choices and inability to unite are like the Palestinians’.

That probably dooms them to statelessness and, eventually, oblivion. Leadership and unity….hmmm.


2018-10-01 on wsws

“The prestigious Peking University effectively banned the students’ Marxist Society after its members came to the support of protesting workers. This response points to fears that political radicalisation and unrest, not only among university students, but among China’s exploited working class, could threaten the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) police-state regime.”

Get real. The kids are tweaking the government’s tail, pushing unionization (currently 130,000,000 the highest on earth both relatively and absolutely) faster than Beijing wants.

The cheeky little buggers are China’s best and brightest, all on full scholarships, high spirited and idealistic. Which is just as well, since they’ll be running the country in 20 years.

In the meantime, 90% of China’s exploited workers own their homes free and clear because they’ve all received 100% pay raises every decade since 1970.

So chill. It’s all in the family.


2018-10-01 on antiwar-blog

” political dissent also earns one lower “social credit” scores. ”

No, political dissent is constitutionally protected. Political mischief–like taking money from a foreign power for advocating the violent overthrow of the government–will definitely hurt your social credit score.

When writing about China, remember that its people trust their government and fully approve of its policies, including Social Credit.


2018-09-30 on foreignpolicyjournal

We’re also not considering what will happen when 2,000,000 S Koreans demonstrate against the US and vote overwhelmingly for reunification regardless of US wishes. Democracy, it’s called.


2018-09-30 on dezeenhq

Brilliant, considering that almost all poor Chinese own their own homes.


2018-09-30 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Meanwhile, Russia and China have fielded the best government teams in recent memory and are beating our pants off, though our media will ensure it take 5 years for the news to filter out.


2018-09-26 on hooverinstitution

Why Are Muslim Governments Around The World Keeping Silent About China’s Human Rights Violations Against The Uyghurs?

Erm, because China has committed no Human Rights violations?

Or because China leads America in 24 of the 30 Human Rights enshrined in The UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights?

Or because most Muslim countries hate America?

Take your pick…

http://www.un.org/en/univer…


2018-09-25 on ceprnet

‘the other side doesn’t offer any solutions’? China offered an immediate $70 billion with more to follow.

Bilateral trade between the two countries contributes little to GDP.

For China, U.S. trade contributes some 2.5% to GDP, while it is only 1% for the U.S. in reverse.

If their trading fell by 20%—more than most expect—the direct hit to their GDP would be 0.5% and 0.2%, respectively.

China’s global current-account surplus has shrunk at an unprecedented rate, falling from 10% of GDP in 2007 to a mere 1.4% today. In other words, China’s trade is in balance with the world.

Meanwhile, there has been little change in the US trade balance with the world, indicating that America’s massive deficit is not China’s fault at all.

The blame lies squarely with US macroeconomic realities, namely a low rate of domestic saving and a high rate of federal borrowing, which Trump’s tax cuts will cause to increase further.


2018-09-23 on sic-semper-tyrannis

Correctamento! As they did with Tibet and Iraq and Vietnam…


2018-09-22 on sic-semper-tyrannis

Far, far way, in a large country that has never tolerated factions (OK, twice, and they caused 500 miserable years), is focused on getting 100% of the population a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care by July 1, 2021.

On that day there will be more homeless, poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China and 450,000,000 urban Chinese will have more net worth and disposable income than the average American–who will defend political factions to the death.

O brave new world that hath such people in it.


2018-09-17 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

China ‘experts’ are worse. Much worse.


2018-09-01 on ceprnet

Abraham Lincoln’s Secretary of State, William Henry Seward, observed, “We elect a king for four years and give him absolute power within certain limits which, after all, he can interpret for himself”. We have an elected, rather than hereditary monarch.


2018-09-01 on truthdig

Expect China to join this conversation mid-year 2021, when every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care. (Right now, more poor people own their homes than middle-class people). https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

On that day there will be more poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China. Not relatively, not per capita. In absolute numbers.


2018-09-01 on wsws

Ah! Lucky us to live in such a free society, where the invisible hand of the market hand can remain, um, invisible.

The Chinese, oppressed by a tyrannical government (that 95% of them insist on trusting, for some reason) are less fortunate, judging from the results of 2010 a Shanghai high-rise fire killed fifty-eight people.

The Minister of Public Security arrived from Beijing at two a.m. and, by dawn, had coordinated twenty-five fire stations and a hundred fire trucks, a thousand firefighters, police, hospitals, finance, insurance, housing, donations, counseling, criminal investigations and the local school district.

Forty-eight hours later, state-owned insurers began compensating families for lost property and $250,000 for each death.

A week later, Shanghai mayor Han Zheng admitted, “We are responsible for poor supervision of the city’s construction industry which caused the fire”.

He implemented new building codes, fired or demoted thirty officials, of whom twenty-two were indicted and most went to prison, two for sixteen years.


2018-08-31 on wsws

Foxconn is a typical bottom-feeding Taiwanese operation, hated everywhere, but needed.


2018-08-30 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Here’s the conclusion from his last published academic paper with my comments [bracketed].

Given China’s demonstrated ability to conquer one export market after another, an important question for both would-be competitors and world policy-makers weighing up various protectionist measures is this: How has China been able to emerge as the world’s “factory floor”?The answer lies in the eight major “economic drivers” of the China price:

Low wages, [by 2021, 800,000,000 urban Chinese will have higher net worth and more disposable income than the average American]

Counterfeiting and piracy [all allegations, no proof in the WTO TRIPS courts, nor US Federal Court, nor Chinese IP courts]

Minimal worker health and safety regulations, [Chinese health and safety regs are more stringent than America’s, as are its UN-measured labor laws]

Lax environmental regulations and enforcement, [the US is the epicenter of lax environmental regulations and enforcement, thanks to President Trump; China beat its Paris goals by 18 years!!]

Export industry subsidies, [like free basic research at government sponsored labs, perhaps?]

A highly efficient “industrial network clustering”, [he nailed that one, but it’s only 10% of the story]

The catalytic role of foreign direct investment (FDI), [all FDI is catalytic, that one reason countries welcome it]

An undervalued currency. [bullshit. Just bullshit. And clueless to boot] https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-08-30 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

My area of specialization is China and I see precisely the same phenomenon there: American ‘analysts’ and ‘scholars’ are, almost without exception, staggeringly ignorant of China itself. Peter Navarro’s ‘analysis’ of China’s success would flunk an introductory course on Chinese trade and industry–and he’s the Administration’s chief advisor.


2018-08-26 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

President Trump, at least, is under no illusions about his staff: “People say you don’t like China. No, I love them,” he said. “But their leaders are much smarter than our leaders. And we can’t sustain ourselves with that. It’s like, take the New England Patriots and Tom Brady and have them play your high school football team.”

https://www.boston.com/spor…


2018-08-23 on russiainsider

“Maoism lost China around 20 years worth of development “. Rubbish.

Mao started with rubble and starving drug addicts and–despite primitive communications, a population doubling in size and longevity, shaky logistics, four revolutions, embargoes, military incursions and nuclear threats–he doubled GDP every decade for twenty-five years while keeping the economy debt-free and society egalitarian.

When he stepped down, China had satellites, atomic weapons, thousands of dams and its infrastructure was far in advance of anything China had known. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-08-20 on od-odrussia

President Macron shares Putin’s brand of authoritarianism since Russian and French share governance structures and both give considerable power to the President over their assemblies (as does America’s governance structure: the President who declares war unilaterally and frequently; issues 300,000 national security letters, administrative subpoenas with gag orders that enjoin recipients from ever divulging they’ve been served; controls information at all times than any monarch in history under the National Security and Emergency Preparedness Communications Functions; tortures, kidnaps and assassinates anyone anywhere at will.

Outlets like RT aid in keeping people ignorant no more than outlets like Groupe France Télévisions.

Can you tell any difference?


2018-08-20 on od-odrussia

Even (especially?) the New York Times inflates its numbers, too.


2018-08-16 on truthdig

An “honest, competent government” wouldn’t need a state police to enforce conformity to policies would it?

No, it wouldn’t. Crime levels?

Serious crime: CHINA 22.1 per 100,000 USA 55.84 3 times more than China

Prisoners per 1000: CHINA 1.21 prisoners. USA 7.02 prisoners

Recidivism: CHINA 7% USA 66%

http://www.nationmaster.com…


2018-08-16 on truthdig

I got the figures from the World Bank, UNHCR, USDOJ.

Name one Chinese ghost town that is currently unoccupied.

Lefty policies seem to work when an honest, competent government administers them. China’s honest, competent government makes it work.


2018-08-15 on truthdig

Short term, perhaps.

But consider this: on June 1, 2021, every Chinese will have a home, a job, plenty of food, education, safe streets, health and old age care.

And guess what? On that day there will be more poor, hungry and imprisoned people in America than in China. Not per capita, or relatively, or per million. Just flat out more. In the richest country on earth.


2018-08-10 on spacenewsinc

Theirs are the best on earth. By a very long margin. Nobody, even the US military, denies this, and both Russia and China deploy it.


2018-08-04 on truthdig

Most reports like this are disinformation, designed to distract us from the facts that:

1. We torture people for fun (since we know it doesn’t work), as State policy.

2. We execute 2000 people and jail another 2,000,000 without trial every year.

3. We have the least trustworthy media on earth.

4. Most of China’s ‘human rights’ heroes are American employees, promoted and paid to produce incidents for these reports. Liu Xiabo, one of several war criminals to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, was on the US payroll for 23 years.

5. These reports never, never give us the charges, evidence, pleadings and transcripts. They’re just standard atrocity stories with all the credibility of the Iraq WMD tale.

6. There are more hungry, homeless and incarcerated people in America–in absolute terms–than in China.
https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-08-04 on truthdig

‘Google is building a new search engine for China, sparking internal debate among employees over the ethics of selling a product to a country that censors its internet. This project has pitted Google employees concerned about privacy and free speech against executives eager to expand into a lucrative market.’

What nonsense. Google is a heavy censor of search results as it admits. Censorship is censorship, whether the censor is public or private. Since all content is censored, the real question is, do people trust the results of censorship? In real life, the more governments are involved in censorship, the more people trust their media.

According to the American Press Institute, “Only six percent of Americans have a lot of confidence in the media, putting the news industry about equal to Congress and well below the public’s view of other institutions”. Perhaps the most serious consequence of privatized censorship has been to conceal China’s accomplishments. When America woke up to the technological challenge in 2018, it was already too late: China had taken the lead five years earlier and was sprinting away.

https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-08-03 on wsws

I suspect, based on my own experience, that there are professional ‘complainers’ whose responsibility it is to cause unwelcome information to be suppressed. A niche profession, a troll subculture, perhaps?


2018-08-02 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Quite so. That party’s over.


2018-08-02 on greanville-post

Now we know what happens when a country privatizes its foreign relations: war and the odium that attaches to it.
Letting men like the Rockefeller Brothers (who were never required to admit–let alone take responsibility for–their errors) whose sole distinction was inheriting money was and is insane.


2018-07-25 on wsws

The working class is the only social force capable of mobilizing behind it all progressive sections of society in a struggle against war, inequality and authoritarianism. Perhaps that’s why they elected Trump. People elected Trump President knowing he was a serial liar, defaulter and narcissist. But they hoped he might blurt out some long-suppressed truths about corruption in media and government, the waste of American treasure on war, and the steep decline in their quality of life.

At great personal risk, he is doing so.

Like Eisenhower–the last pre-assassination president–he told the military he would sign more checks if they would win more wars. He gave them two years. They failed.

He started smashing NATO by skipping its first meeting and bad-mouthing it. He has continued doing so.

When the media clamored for war he gave them fireworks–a glorious MOAB fireball over Afghanistan, and the Syrian missile attacks that killed practically no-one.

In Syria he coordinated with the Russian military, de-conflicted air space and ground operations.

He told the State Department and the Pentagon to seek direct peace talks with the Taliban.

He has done more than any president in history to establish personal relationships with America’s manufactured ‘enemies’. He’s the only non-family member to have spent two days alone with China’s President Xi (while their families hung out) protected by his own security. No Secret Service. When has that ever happened?

Xi, Kim and Putin are obviously convinced he wants peace because they know what risks he’s taking. The Secret Service and other agencies betrayed Kennedy for much less.

Today his private security staff populate the White House and the Secret Service stays out of his way. My guess is that he has the backing of the Deep Military. His Cabinet is generals and admirals, 1950s Republicans who want a return to the Eisenhower years of peace, prosperity and regular golf. The Pentagon is the only arm of government that can crush the intelligence agencies physically, politically and in PR. Its PR budget alone dwarfs most of the world’s military budgets.

My guess is that he has the 100% support of Putin, Xi and Kim. After the EU-China talks yesterday a reporter asked China’s trade minister whether the two sides would unite to fight America’s trade moves and he responded, “No. No we cannot leave America behind, pretend that America is the enemy. We must bring America along with us because there’s a real problem and we can only solve it cooperatively”.

But the War Party is not taking this peace talk peacefully. Today’s New York Times said, ‘Among Mr. Trump’s critics, even the word “treason” is not too strong. As our chief White House correspondent put it: “Never in anyone’s lifetime has a president engendered such a wave of discussion about whether his real loyalty was to a foreign power over his own country.”’

The fight for peace is the biggest battle of our generation and the guy leading could be the most unlikely hero in world history.


2018-07-20 on wsws

By contrast, it’s simply lazy to deny that China is a democracy just because her application of it is different from ours.

China is far more democratic than the USA in both form and substance. Not only do more Chinese vote but voter turnout is 20% higher than America’s and voter trust and satisfaction with their government is many times higher.

No matter how you slice it–constitutionally, electively, popularly, procedurally, operationally, substantively or financially–China comes out ahead. In survey after survey, it’s the most trusted government in the world and its policies enjoy the highest support. Don’t believe me? Read ‘Selling Democracy to the Chinese’ https://www.unz.com/article….


2018-07-16 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

‘Perhaps a breakthrough does occur, but certainly not tomorrow, and when China will be Science with a capital letter, which will take more than a decade’.

Seriously? According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb.

China leads the world in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and quantum secure direct communications. “Approximately 72% of the academic patent families published in QIT since 2012 have been from Chinese universities. US universities are a distant second with 12%.” (Patintformatics). Southeast University laboratory has made several major breakthroughs—including the first-ever programmable metamaterials that can alter their physical properties with electricity.


2018-07-09 on ceprnet

China’s 256% debt to GDP is similar to America’s and the EU’s, with these exceptions:
1. 95% of it is internal.
2. 80% is between Chinese Government departments.
3. The debt quality is high: asset to debt ratio is is 4:1
4. China’s economy is growing three time faster than America’s and the EU’s, and growth eats debt.


2018-07-05 on truthdig

‘The “interview” piece at Vanity Fair starts off by noting how Berners-Lee talks non-stop, but then almost no actual quotations of Berners-Lee are offered. How does that happen?’

Ann Lee[1] recounts a conversation with Michael Massing, former executive editor of the Columbia Journalism Review, “A reporter and friend of his who worked at the Beijing office of The Wall Street Journal told him that the editors in Washington regularly changed material information and opinions in his articles. Given the twelve-hour time difference, by the time his stories went to press in the West, the editors had replaced all the Chinese interviews with statements from American talking heads who work at think tanks promoting anti-China perspectives”.

As the father of American public relations, Edward Bernays, put it, “The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the masses is an important element in democratic society…Those who manipulate this unseen mechanism constitute an invisible government which is the true ruling power of our country”.

[1] What the U.S. Can Learn from China, Ann Lee


2018-06-26 on technode

Ten million people visit his birthplace every year and another 6 million visit his tomb. Why? Mao did more good–and less harm–for more people than anyone in history. Why do you think 10,000,000 people visit his birthplace each year, despite official efforts to discourage them?

When Mao stepped onto the world stage in 1945 his country was convulsed by civil war, Russia had taken Mongolia and a piece of Xinjiang, Japan still occupied three northern provinces, Britain had taken Hong Kong, Portugal Macau, France pieces of Shanghai, Germany Tsingtao, and America dominated the opium trade.

In 1949 China was agrarian, backward, feudalistic, ignorant and violent. Of its four hundred million people, fifty-million were drug addicts, eighty percent could neither read nor write and life expectancy was thirty-five years. Peasants paid seventy percent of their produce in rent, women’s feet were bound, desperate mothers sold their children in exchange for food and poor people, preferring slavery to starvation, sold themselves. U.S. Ambassador John Leighton Stuart reported that, during his second year in China, ten million people starved to death in three provinces. The Japanese had killed twenty-million and General Chiang Kai-Shek wrote that, of every thousand youths he recruited, barely a hundred survived the march to training base.

By 1974 Mao had doubled the population, doubled life expectancy, reunited, reimagined, reformed and revitalized the largest, oldest civilization on earth, modernized it after a century of failed modernizations, liberated more women than anyone in history and ended thousands of years of famines. A strategist without peer, political innovator, he was a master geopolitician and a Confucian peasant, under crushing embargoes Mao had grown GDP by 7.3 percent annually and left the country debt-free.

Harvard’s professor of Chinese Studies, John King Fairbanks, summarized[1] his legacy: “The simple facts of Mao’s career seem incredible: in a vast land of 400 million people, at age 28 with a dozen others to found a party and in the next fifty years to win power, organize, and remold the people and reshape the land–history records no greater achievement. Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne, all the kings of Europe, Napoleon, Bismarck, Lenin–no predecessor can equal Mao Tse-tung’s scope of accomplishment, for no other country was ever so ancient and so big as China. Indeed Mao’s achievement is almost beyond our comprehension”. [Fairbanks, The United States and China].


2018-06-26 on technode

Nope. Mao didn’t kill anyone. In fact, he not only doubled the population, he also doubled their life expectancy! https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-06-26 on technode

Nonsense. The PRC has the most trusted government on earth precisely because it doesn’t lie. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-06-22 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Bravo! A tour de force, if you get my drift..


2018-06-21 on chinalawblog

” it is unlikely China will develop new EV technology through indigenous innovation”?

Really? China leads the world in basic sciences and in almost every technology, so why should it not lead in battery technology, too?


2018-06-20 on wsws

This is a trifle partisan, which diminishes its usefulness for non-combatants like me.


2018-06-20 on wsws

One night in 2010 a Shanghai high-rise fire killed fifty-eight people. The Minister of Public Security arrived from Beijing at two a.m. and, by dawn, had coordinated twenty-five fire stations and a hundred fire trucks, a thousand firefighters, police, hospitals, finance, insurance, housing, donations, counseling, criminal investigations and the local school district.

Forty-eight hours later, state-owned insurers compensated families for lost property and $250,000 for each death.

A week later, Shanghai mayor Han Zheng admitted, “Poor supervision of the city’s construction industry caused the fire and we are responsible for that”. He implemented new building codes, fired or demoted thirty officials and indicted twenty-two, of whom most went to prison, two for sixteen years. The contrast with London’s Grenfell Tower fire is stark.


2018-06-18 on truthdig

American democracy descends from Cassius Dio’s Rome, where amoral amateurs made unfulfillable promises and, when elected, voted for endless wars that profited anonymous oligarchs who funded their election campaigns.

Like theirs, our political factions still fight for power despite George Washington’s warning, “Party serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasional riot and insurrection. It opens the door to foreign influence and corruption which finds a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passions. Thus the policy and the will of one country are subjected to the policy and will of another”.


2018-06-16 on chinalawblog

We are being out-governed. China’s governance team are professionals at the top of their games while ours are utter amateurs. This has been coming for a long time–it has been announced policy for at least 12 years: announced by a government that has delivered 95% of its Five Year promises for sixty years.


2018-06-16 on russiainsider

Thank you! I’d been waiting for the onslaught and wondering why it didn’t happen.


2018-06-16 on technode

Thanks for your penetrating insight. You have added a great deal to this conversation about technical standards for cellular communications.

Whatever their affiliation, Western trolls are just people struggling to maintain their cognitive dissonance and lashing out at anyone who suggests that things might be different than TV and mass media have portrayed them.

90% of their comments are just assertions devoid of evidence and even logic, and usually heavy on personal insults. Most recently, one troll suggested that I had only posted an answer about Putin (too positive for their tastes) because I had sucked his dick. Obviously this in not an effective counter to any argument, but the reason for that is that they have no counter-argument other than to attack me personally.

I now view such troll comments as the champagne of success because it means that I am using facts and logical reasoning effectively. These things are anathema to the type of person who makes troll comments because they live in a world in which their opinions are crafted by the media, not their own rational judgement, and having that exposed is extremely uncomfortable.

“I seldom see an intelligent comment on websites that have comment sections. Most comments come from people too ashamed to speak in their real names and who are unwilling to provide their real email addresses. Almost all comments come from narcistic ignorant fools hiding behind fake names and fake email addresses and from paid trolls.

I don’t write in order to be slandered by paid trolls and ignorant narcistic fools. I regard it as highly irresponsible for websites to undercut their writers with anonymous accusations and slander from no one knows who. There should be no comment sections unless there is a firm check on the commentator’s real name and real email address.” –Dr. Paul Craig Roberts, Fmr. Ronald Reagan Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy


2018-06-15 on technode

Uh, China looks to open a two-year lead over the US in 5G implementation and, thus, application development…


2018-06-12 on russiainsider

“In China, the media is tightly controlled by the state. It’s there to advance CCP narratives, but they never seem to do anything as bizarre as what’s going on in Western (((media))) right now. The principle is pretty simple to understand: if you keep saying things that are patently ridiculous, people will stop believing you.”

The evidence is now undeniable:

https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-06-11 on technode

Good summary. The impetus is really to bring 400 million unbanked people into the money economy in a trustable way, and trust is where Chinese society shines: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-06-08 on middleeasteye

We wait, with breath bated, for the first filing of German human rights charges against similar American torturers.


2018-06-05 on technode

single-day delivery across China and 72-hour delivery worldwide.??

Yikes!!


2018-05-29 on wsws

Many of these criticisms are valid but would have been tempered had the author investigated the school system which, though bigger and poorer than Australia’s, overtook us and became the world’s leader: Shanghai.

For those seriously interested in how Shanghai did it, I recommend ‘Learning from Shanghai,’ by Charlene Tan. (Shanghai tests plenty, so it would be useful to learn what they test and how).


2018-05-23 on technode

I suspect China’s going to revolutionize the entire health care industry–a complete rework that cuts costs and boosts reliability by 40%.


2018-05-22 on truthdig

“The Trump administration did not rise, prima facie, like Venus on a half shell from the sea. Donald Trump is the result of a long process of political, cultural and social decay.”

Indeed, as HL Mencken observed, “All the odds are on the man who is, intrinsically, the most devious and mediocre — the man who can most adeptly disperse the notion that his mind is a virtual vacuum. The Presidency tends, year by year, to go to such men. As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”


2018-05-17 on hooverinstitution

Be wary of attributing Roman ends to a Confucian leader. Statements like ‘its main purpose is to create a more disciplined and accountable administration to serve as an instrument for Xi Jinping’ certainly resonate with Western readers and are, in any case, true enough to be said. Of course none of the newcomers and upcomers will be people Xi loathes…

But the main purpose–main–is to improve the delivery of goods and services to the people of China. China’s governance model has meany weaknesses–as any Chinese official will tell you–but it does a better job than any other government at delivering the goods and services that Chinese people want, be that affordable housing (90% home ownership) or improved air quality (22% improvement in 24 months).

We’re being out-governed. Badly.


2018-05-14 on technode

Thank God none of our children will ever grow up with credit ratings attached to their little names that will dog them for the rest of their lives. Or be secretly banned from flying by our government. Freedom!

Our media are interpreting yet another Chinese policy, Social Credit, in Western terms. But China does things differently and, often, better.

2018 demonstrates, once material needs are met the Chinese begin fret about moral self-improvement: “Our society currently suffers from socially unhealthy phenomena like economic disputes, telecommunications fraud, lack of trust and indifference to human feelings. One reason for this is the poor construction of our integrity system. It’s not difficult to understand why or how the construction of an integrity system is important: it should start with the institutional system then make a genuine effort to strengthen social integrity based on honesty, promise-keeping and respect for basic morality and customs”.

First, Social Credit is a popular initiative: the Chinese are the most trusting society on earth yet don’t have credit ratings so they’re tired of being scammed online for billions each year. Chinese trust their government–not private credit agencies like Equifax–to run projects that impact everyone because they trust their government far more than we trust ours: 86% of them say it works for everybody and not just for a fortunate few.

Second, Social Credit doesn’t just rate citizens. It rates everyone from government departments and individual officials to cops, corporations, Supreme Court justices, Congresspeople–absolutely everyone and every enterprise gets a social credit rating that arises naturally from their interactions with others.

Third, doesn’t this sound better than being secretly rated by private corporations who sell your information to other private corporations and secretly share it with government agencies–without your permission? And charge us for access to our own information? And offer no reciprocity? Ask TRW for a vendor’s credit history and current rating and what it costs you.

Here’s a little stat that might throw some light on the subject: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-05-13 on sic-semper-tyrannis

“The cultural centers are said to be havens for Chinese spies, and also provide a platform for Chinese propaganda against unsuspecting U.S. college students”?

Did the sheer arrogance, the utter silliness of this statement occur to you as you wrote it? Everything China needs to know it can learn from the daily news media, US companies donating their IP, scholarly journals, its embassies and thousands of returning PhD graduates. Or by simply picking up the phone to the White House and asking politely.

China has a comfortable lead over America in the hard sciences and in most technologies, a much bigger economy growing much faster and a far superior military position within 1000 km of its borders. Why on earth would it need to spy on America?


2018-05-10 on russiainsider

I’m suggesting that he was one of many people who lied. Many. Mostly paid handsomely by NED and other US agencies.


2018-05-09 on truthdig

Marx called such problems ‘contradictions’. Every two years the CCP convenes to review what they call their ‘leading contradictions’ and make appropriate adjustments. We have no mechanism. Laissez faire, baby, laissez faire.


2018-05-09 on truthdig

China installs more than half the world’s new solar and wind capacity each year and nuclear, wind, solar and hydropower generate almost thirty percent of its electricity. Between 1980-2010, while the economy grew eighteen-fold, energy consumption grew fivefold, a seventy percent decline in energy intensity, and plans a further fifteen percent reduction by 2021. The country will reach its Paris Climate Agreement goal–reducing emissions intensity by seventy percent below its 2005 levels–long before the promised 2030 date.


2018-05-09 on truthdig

In 2014, Chinese engineers began constructing coal-fired plants twenty percent more efficient and thirty percent less polluting and which display real-time emissions on large billboards. Since their fuel savings recoup their investment in fifteen years, they’re rapidly replacing older units. By 2020, all power plants will be equally clean and cut lifetime emissions of NOx, sulfur dioxide, particulates and CO2 by billions of tons.

But replacing dirty, coal-fired plants with cleaner, coal-fired plants is a stopgap because the world’s 1,500 biggest coal-fired plants will still generate thirty percent of the planet’s carbon dioxide emissions. So the government plans to reduce their emissions to zero by replacing their coal furnaces with Pebble Bed Reactors using stacked, uranium-cored graphite spheres, ‘pebbles,’ and circulating helium to conduct their heat to boilers. Passively safe–overheated stacks melt a plug and the pebbles roll into a cooling area–the first plant will come online in 2019, to be followed by a factory that will mass-produce reactors designed to be shipped, in modules, to the sites of existing coal-fired mega-plants, where they will replace coal furnaces with pebble bed furnaces. The mega-plants will continue operating with existing staffs, electricity grids, transmission lines, cooling water, roads and railroad tracks–but zero pollution.

China leads the world in IP, construction and deployment of all renewable energies.


2018-05-09 on russiainsider

Solzhenitsyn’s analysis of Soviet communism was based on the notion that the Bolsheviks imposed a totalitarian system on Russia that had no basis in Russian history or character. He laid the blame on Marx and Engels and the Bolsheviks.

Russian culture, he argued, and particularly that of the Russian Orthodox Church, was suppressed in favour of atheist Soviet culture. Persona non grata in the Soviet Union, Solzhenitsyn lived in exile in the US from 1974, but found western culture equally to his distaste. His historical writing is imbued with a hankering after an idealized Tsarist era when, seemingly, everything was rosy. He sought refuge in a dreamy past, where, he believed, a united Slavic state (the Russian empire) built on Orthodox foundations had provided an ideological alternative to western individualistic liberalism.

His 1946 conviction in eight years imprisonment was a result of his counter-revolutionary, pro-Nazi activity. Alexandr Solzhenitsyn never hide his pro-Nazi feelings; in fact he accussed Stalin for driving the USSR to war instead of making an agreement with the Third Reich. For Solzhenitsyn, it was Stalin who should be blamed for the millions of Soviet victims in the war against fascism and not the imperialist, expansive policy of Nazi Germany: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-05-08 on truthdig

China invests more in clean energy each year than America and Europe combined and is increasing that investment by eight percent annually. It installs more than half the world’s new solar and wind capacity each year and nuclear, wind, solar and hydropower generate almost thirty percent of its electricity. Between 1980-2010, while the economy grew eighteen-fold, energy consumption grew fivefold, a seventy percent decline in energy intensity, and plans a further fifteen percent reduction by 2021. The country will reach its Paris Climate Agreement goal–reducing emissions intensity by seventy percent below its 2005 levels–long before the promised 2030 date.

Since China is the world’s leading producer and installer of renewable energy sources, there is little doubt that Chinese firms bid to install these in all overseas tenders. But, ultimately, the choice is the customer’s, not China’s.

And even when the customer chooses a coal-fired plant, the world comes out ahead if the winning bidder is China–because China is also the world’s leading producer and installer of ultra-efficient coal plants. In 2014, engineers began constructing plants twenty percent more efficient and thirty percent less polluting and which display real-time emissions on large billboards. Since their fuel savings recoup their investment in fifteen years, they’re rapidly replacing older units. By 2020, all power plants will be equally clean and cut lifetime emissions of NOx, sulfur dioxide, particulates and CO2 by billions of tons.

But replacing dirty, coal-fired plants with cleaner, coal-fired plants is a stopgap because the world’s 1,500 biggest coal-fired plants will still generate thirty percent of the planet’s carbon dioxide emissions. So the government plans to reduce their emissions to zero by replacing their coal furnaces with Pebble Bed Reactors using stacked, uranium-cored graphite spheres, ‘pebbles,’ and circulating helium to conduct their heat to boilers. Passively safe–overheated stacks melt a plug and the pebbles roll into a cooling area–the first plant will come online in 2019, to be followed by a factory that will mass-produce reactors designed to be shipped, in modules, to the sites of existing coal-fired mega-plants, where they will replace coal furnaces with pebble bed furnaces. The mega-plants will continue operating with existing staffs, electricity grids, transmission lines, cooling water, roads and railroad tracks–but zero pollution.


2018-05-08 on russiainsider

‘Communist regimes produced the greatest ideological carnage in human history, killing more than a hundred million people in the last century.’

Nonsense. And quoting The Wall Street Journal as your source for that silly claim is even worse nonsense. The Russian Civil War killed a few hundred thousand, and the ensuing Communist Revolution killed several hundred thousand more who were adamantly opposed to sharing anything.

The Chinese Revolution killed nobody since Mao forbade it. His Great Leap Forward didn’t kill anyone either, though there were excess deaths among people over 60 (life expectancy was 58 then) due to the drought, whose effects were intensified by America’s grain embargo.[http://www.unz.com/article/…]

Cuba? A few hundred. 99% of Korean deaths were caused by capitalist USA. Ditto Vietnam…And capitalism has been on a tear in the past 40 years, massacring millions more civilians for no particular reason.

All Communist countries enjoyed huge upgrades in living standards and life expectancy after their revolutions, too.


2018-05-04 on technode

I was wondering how they’d solve that problem. Very ingenious!


2018-05-02 on sic-semper-tyrannis

Anyone who has ever contemplated initiating a false flag event, like planting evidence on a rival, realizes, after a while, how very complex even such a simple operation is. An affluent, highly educated CA couple tried this on a teacher who had given their child poor marks and were eventually unmasked. The Skripal incident is 1000 times more complex and, thus, more vulnerable to discovery. All that prevents it is the connivance of our media–which the CA couple lacked.
http://www.nydailynews.com/…


2018-04-28 on truthdig

Researchers discovered, almost by accident, that the number of men and women in China is approximately equal. After the Education Ministry demanded an accurate count of girls’ enrollment and graduation rates in 2016, John Kennedy and Yaojiang Shi compared[1] the 2010 census to the Ministry’s figures and concluded, “People think 30 million girls are missing from the population. That’s the population of California and they think they’re just gone. Most people are using a demographic explanation to say that abortion or infanticide are the reasons girls don’t show up in the census and that they don’t exist. But we find there’s a political explanation. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

“The point of contention is the interaction between the central state’s capacity to influence local officials and the willingness of local officials to implement central policies, especially unpopular policies. We find that millions of unreported female births ‘appear’ in older cohorts [school enrollments], and this also reflects a cultural shift regarding the value of girls in China. The ‘preference for sons’ cultural argument suggests that parents see sons as necessary for elderly care and contributions to family income while daughters are viewed as a burden. However, scholars suggest that over the last few decades, and especially since the introduction of economic reforms, daughters have contributed more to their natal families (i.e. increased their value). Still, the 1990, 2000 and 2010 censuses show that unreported male births are overwhelmingly registered between the ages of one and ten years old but that the vast majority of children registered after the age of ten are females. This implies an administrative bias towards sons whereby they are registered earlier than daughters, rather than a strict son preference (i.e. fewer daughters)”.

To keep the peace in their villages, officials–often the mothers’ blood relatives–turned a blind eye to children born outside Family Planning limits and left them unreported. Though the government relaxed the rural one-child policy in the 1980s and allowed villagers to have a second child if the first was a girl, Kennedy found that village-level enforcement had already bypassed the policy: the Heavens were high and the Emperor far away.

Kennedy interviewed a farmer who introduced his elder daughter and son by name but referred to his middle daughter as ‘the non-existent one’. “He told us that his first daughter was registered but that when his second child, a daughter, was born they did not register her and instead waited to have another child. The third child was a boy and they registered him as the second child,” Kennedy said. In further evidence, more girls than boys graduate from university and, when data is normalized for job position and seniority, the gender wage gap simply disappears. To remind their ancient, patriarchal society that they do indeed hold up half the sky as Mao said, women now keep their surnames after marriage, have an annual holiday on International Women’s Day, enjoy generous maternity leave and a lowered retirement age.

[1] Delayed Registration and Identifying the “Missing Girls” in China. The China Quarterly, Volume 228, December 2016, pp. 1018-1038


2018-04-25 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Eisenhower, a notoriously cold fish, wept when he held the hand of his opposite number, Georgi Zhukov. Together, he said, the two of them could straighten out Europe’s problems in a week…


2018-04-24 on technode

Fascinating!! Many thanks!


2018-04-23 on russiainsider

Thanks again, Pepe!! Great stuff.


2018-04-23 on antiwar-orig

Spot on!!

Two quibbles: ‘China charges down the “capitalist road” (as the Maoists used to put it) at 100 miles per hour’? Nope, the charge ends when it achieves the goal Deng set for it: a xiaokang society by June 1, 2021. Prior to that, the Chinese people still own the commanding heights of the economy (FIRE) and after that, until 2035, President Xi has promised to bring China’s GINI down to Finland’s level.

and ‘Russia is simply a bit player in the region’? Hardly, It has offered the reunited country gas and oil pipelines to cut the Peninsula’s energy by 20% and connection to the Trans Asian Rail network.


2018-04-22 on truthdig

China is ‘ruled by a dictator which can imprison or kill any dissent even if people are starving’.

Have you ever been to China? Know anything about its government? Its relationship to its citizens? China is far more democratic than, say, the USA, in both form and substance. Not only do more Chinese vote but voter turnout is 20% higher than America’s and voter trust and satisfaction with their government is many times higher.

The USA is not and has never been a democracy. Its founding fathers hated democracy and mentioned the term nowhere in the constitutional documents. The USA is a republic, as every school child can tell you, since it is to the republic and the flag for which it stands that they pledge their allegiance each day. In China, at least, their elected representatives get to vote on presidential appointments. In America, voting on presidential appointments is done by non-elected people–as we saw with President Trump.

No matter how you slice it–constitutionally, electively, popularly, procedurally, operationally, substantively or financially–China comes out ahead.

In survey after survey, it’s the most trusted government in the world and its policies enjoy the highest support. Don’t believe me? Read ‘Selling Democracy to the Chinese’ https://www.unz.com/article…. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-04-22 on truthdig

Adjusted for productivity, Chinese manufacturing employees cost their employers almost the same as American workers cost theirs–mostly because Chinese wages have been doubling every ten years since 1980. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

The Wall Street Journal reported rising wages with alarm, “In 2012 alone, the average wage rose by 14 percent. Western corporations such as Crystal Group, which produces clothes for Abercrombie & Fitch and Gap, have pulled out because of ‘rising labor costs’”. By 2018–adjusted for productivity, regulations, rising wages and benefits–Chinese workers were no cheaper than their American cousins. http://djusted%20for%20productivity,%20Chinese%20workers%20are%20only%204%20percent%20cheaper,%20partly%20due%20to%20unique%20employment%20laws.


2018-04-22 on russiainsider

Good stuff, but China is literally irrelevant to this argument, which is domestic.

“Chinese style censorship” is nothing like American style censorship because Chinese style government is nothing like America style government.

They are literally different worlds with different values, as this chart suggests: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-04-14 on theaviationist

“Russia also has a reputation for using media as a tool to craft perception of outcomes, historically to a greater degree than the U.S.”

Au contraire, mon brave! Russia has a reputation for being blunt and its media has a reputation for short reach and low impact, especially when compared to the extreme sophistication and massive reach of Western media.

It’s simply no contest.


2018-04-13 on sic-semper-tyrannis

This will be the third offshore standoff between the powers. Russia interposed itself between the USN and India during an Indo-Pak squabble (India has since bought all its weapons from Russia) and between the USN and Syria at the start of this war:

“It was touch and go, just as risky as the Cuban missile crisis of 1962. The chances for total war were high, as the steely wills of America and Eurasia had crossed in the Eastern Mediterranean. The most dramatic event of September 2013 was the high-noon stand-off near the Levantine shore, with five US destroyers pointing their Tomahawks towards Damascus and facing them – the Russian flotilla of eleven ships led by the carrier-killer Missile Cruiser Moskva and supported by Chinese warships. Apparently, two missiles were launched towards the Syrian coast, and both failed to reach their destination. (We shall return to these two missiles later)….

And now back to those two missiles of 2013. They were sent by the Israelis, whether they were trying to jump-start the shoot-out or just observed the clouds, as they claim. The missiles never reached its destination, shot down by the Russian ship-based sea-to-air defence system, or perhaps rendered useless by Russian GPS jammers….The Cape of Good Hope.


2018-04-09 on antiwar-orig

Hmmm. A trifle dishonest, I’d say. “Beijing’s bid for overseas bases began quietly in 2011 when it started investing almost $250 million in the transformation of a sleepy fishing village at Gwadar, Pakistan..That same year, China began building a major military facility at Djibouti… Simultaneously, Sri Lanka, located at a midpoint in the Indian Ocean, settled a billion-dollar debt to China by ceding it a strategic port at Hambantota.

In other words, China placed a very small (compared to Camp Lemonnier) resupply depot in Djibouti in response to USN complaints about its being a ‘free rider,’ not pulling its weight in the fight against piracy.

Apart from that, China has no overseas bases.


2018-04-08 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

Can you track that down? SAS captives??


2018-04-07 on washingtons

Fascinating example: “THE CLOCK IS TICKING”: INSIDE THE WORST U.S. MARITIME DISASTER IN DECADES. A recording salvaged from three miles deep tells the story of the doomed “El Faro,” a cargo ship engulfed by a hurricane. BY WILLIAM LANGEWIESCHE
https://www.vanityfair.com/…


2018-04-03 on nationalinterest

“The US and the UK gave Germany the green light to attack Russia.”?

In a memo on 21 December 1938, Lavrenty Beria reported to Stalin about Soviet-seized documents, which included reports of Finnish envoys to London, Paris, and Warsaw on Germany’s eastward expansion, and the position of the British, French, and Polish governments on this issue. Thus, Finnish Ambassador in London Grippenberg reported to his Foreign Ministry, “I heard the opinion that German propaganda of colonies is false. As Britons put it, it is a smokescreen to cover the preparations of a plan concerning the Soviet Ukraine. Hitler himself told French Ambassador Francois-Poncet that he was not even thinking about any colonies”, the document reads. Later, on 25 November, Grippenberg reported his conversation with a British government member who assured him that Britain and France would not interfere in Germany’s eastward expansion. “Britain’s position is as follows, ‘let’s wait until Germany and the USSR get involved in a major conflict’”, the document reads.


2018-04-03 on theasanforum

Good thinking, though I would go further: China plans to lead the way its founding genius, Confucius recommended: by virtuous example because, as President Xi recently reminded everyone, “a virtuous leader is like the North Star, which stays in place while the firmament revolves around it”.

Our media gives us such a distorted picture of China that we find it incomprehensible that China has any virtues whatever. But virtue, like most things, begins at home and the Chinese–the most politically sophisticated people on earth–are as awestruck by their government as the rest of the world will someday be. To wit: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-04-03 on chinaaccountingblog

Great piece! Nice to see some straight talk for a change!


2018-04-02 on technode

Thanks. Stay on top of this, please, Frank. It’s going to be big.


2018-04-02 on technode

Great article! Please follow this issue closely. China looks to open a two-year lead over the US in 5G implementation and, thus, application development…


2018-04-02 on nationalinterest

In the fall and winter of 1941, when defeat for the Red Army seemed all but inevitable, the Western Allies weren’t able to do a thing to aid the USSR in this moment of need most dire.

German deployment in North Africa and in France was neglible at that point. The whole of the Wehrmacht’s armies were fighting in the East, along with the Italians, Finns and other minor Axis powers.

American Lend-Lease to the USSR wasn’t possible yet as the Mediterranean was still contested. The British could tie up only a fraction of the German Luftwaffe, and Kriegsmarine. The British couldn’t tie up a single German tank, solider or artillery piece as yet.

So it was the USSR and the USSR alone that fought its way through the winter of 1941 and emerged victorious in the following spring, marking the beginning of the end for the Third Reich.

Soviet Siberian divisions on the attack in T-34s and full arctic gear.

It was through the efforts of these men in the winter of 1941 that the USSR was saved from destruction and the “war was won”.

From that point on, the eventual defeat of Germany was only a matter of time. The Soviets were capable of producing more tanks and planes in a week than the Germans were in a month or more. Without the threat of Japan, in the Soviets were able to draw from their Siberian and Central Asian manpower reserves. Germany simply couldn’t win this war of attrition.

American Lend-Lease aid wasn’t able to come through the Black Sea until well into 1942. In Operation Uranus, the Soviet counterattack at Stalingrad, the Red Army first employed American Sherman tanks in great numbers, and with good results.

Soviet tankers mounting American Lend Lease M4A2 Shermans armed with the improved 76mm high velocity gun. Effective even against Tiger I and Panther tanks. The Americans spared no expense to aid the Soviets in their fight against the Third Reich.

Later, in preparation for Operation Bagration, the Soviet summer offensive of 1944, the Americans sent Stalin a gift of 100,000 (yes, that’s 1 with 5 zeros behind it) Studebaker trucks. These trucks were instrumental in allowing the Soviets to carry an offensive deep into German occupied Belorussia and effectively obliterate Army Group Center, the last major German Army Group in the East, far larger than the forces opposing the Western Allies in Normandy.

This monster of a tank is the Soviet designed and built SU-152, the 152mm armored self-propelled howitzer. It was designed to break through heavy reinforced concrete fortifications while not having to stop to limber and unlimber like traditional artillery.

These machines allowed the Soviet armored spearheads to push forward without delay. They saw decisive use in the titanic Soviet offensives of 1944.

But by 1945, the supply of American aid had more or less dried up. The US knew that it could no longer supply arms to its rival now that Germany was vanquished.


2018-04-02 on neweconomicthinking

Richard Vague’s excellent presentation on Western debt is fascinating.

But his observations about Chinese debt are nonsense–because they’re based on the common assumption that China’s economy and, indeed, China itself, is another, possibly inferior version of our own.

China’s debt is nothing like ours because its economy is nothing like ours which is why Richard’s assertion, that financial crises cannot be avoided is, empirically untrue: China’s GDP has doubled every ten years for 70 years without a single crisis.

As we can see from the BIS figures in the chart below, China’s debt to GDP ratio is the same as the US and the EU. But here are the differences:

1. Its economy is growing three times faster than theirs, reducing its debt burden to one-third of theirs.

2. The debt is entirely internal to China.

3. Eighty percent of the debt is, essentially, between government departments.

4. The quality of the debt is shockingly high. If you know how Chinese handle money, this should come as no surprise, but the St. Louis Fed was shocked to find that the government’s ROI was averaging 200%. ”Is Government Spending a Free Lunch? — Evidence from China – Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Working Paper. Xin Wang and Yi Wen. https://research.stlouisfed….

5. Over the last decade, real income adjusted for inflation in urban China has gone up by 120%. You can compare that to an 11% increase during that same period of time in the US, or about 2% in the UK. So that arms Chinese consumers with the cash to spend. There’s also lower household debt.

‘Nuf said.

https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-04-02 on neweconomicthinking

How has Piketty responded to your observations?


2018-04-02 on nationalinterest

“Russia and China would have been much worse off without the US”. No, The US and the UK gave Germany the green light to attack Russia.

“Zhukov himself is on record saying he would have lost without US aid”. Can you provide a link to support that claim? I’m familiar with Zhukov’s career and have never seen such a statement.


2018-04-02 on russiainsider

Fleets win battles but economies win wars. China’s economy is already 30% bigger than America’s. By 2020 it will be game over.


2018-04-02 on russiainsider

Some fascinating claims but where are the links that support them?


2018-04-02 on breitbartproduction

“Goldman added that China is well aware it faces a serious image problem with prospective economic partners. “Everyone hates them,” he argued.”

Erm, no. Everybody wants to trade with them because they keep their word and don’t interfere in other countries’ internal affairs. That’s why more countries trust China than America.


2018-04-02 on thehill-v4

Great observations! A few quibbles:

1. “One reason for this shift is a growing sense that China is not becoming more democratic”. China is far more democratic than the USA, in both form and substance. Voter turnout is 20% higher than ours and voter trust and satisfaction with their government is many times higher. Even their soldiers get to elect their NCOs.

2. “Its working age population is shrinking” but its productivity is doubling every ten years while its population remains stable. That will handle retirees in luxury–which is why pensions keep doubling every decade, too.

3. “rocketing debt levels drag down growth”, China’s debt to GDP ratio is the same as the USA’s but the debt is internal (mostly between government departments) and its economy is growing 300% faster, and growth eats debt.

4. “corruption remains rampant”? Policy-level corruption–the kind that matters–has never approached American levels, which is why 90% of Chinese trust their government and 30% of us trust ours.

5. “much investment has been wasted”. It is difficult to reconcile blazing fast growth, 21st century infrastructure, low debt and wasted investment.

6. “Internationally, neighbors view it with suspicion”? Our media tycoon view it with suspicion because of its rival political model. Nobody who knows the facts about China views it with suspicion, including its SE Asian neighbors, does.

7. its soft power is weak. If you’re comparing it to the influence of K-Pop, sure. But in terms of UN support and its capacity to do good through things like the AIIB, it’s a giant compared to the US


2018-04-01 on truthdig

“You can’t stand across a street and count trucks coming in and out of the property ’cause there’s no such thing as public property. It’s all owned by the government.””

Owned by the government?

If you want to know who owns our ‘public spaces,’ try demonstrating in them. The government–in the form of law enforcement authorities, evicts members of the public from public spaces thousands of times every day.

At least in China the government isn’t entirely owned by wealthy people, as this chart shows: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-03-31 on washingtons

Oddly enough, China was permitted to join the WTO only under the most odious conditions. When the WTO came into existence in 1994, the U.S. and E.U. owned 56% of global GDP and, because of the their huge markets, controlled the Uruguay Round negotiations that led to the WTO’s creation, which they viewed as a victory, in constitutional terms, for economic liberalism. In a memorable moment of triumphalism the US–never reluctant to claim victory prematurely– promised that China’s membership would transform it into a market economy and move it towards liberal democracy.

China had requested membership of GATT in 1986 but it was not until 2001 that WTO members approved her accession (in Doha) after forcing her to accept reduced rights against other members compared to standard WTO rules, to open her markets, eliminate state monopolies on imports and exports and to significantly change her domestic laws, regulations, and practices. China was forced to agree to open its economy to competition and to overhaul its domestic laws, regulations, procedures, and administrative and judicial institutions across all levels of government, to make deep tariff commitments for imports, to significantly liberalize services and to agree that all regulations affecting trade would be nondiscriminatory and that government standard-setting would be transparent and based on international standards. China further committed to stringent IP protection and independent review of all trade-related administrative actions by judicial or administrative tribunals.

The country had started revising its laws before it joined the WTO when, as gatekeeper to China’s accession, the U.S. pressed China to agree to China-specific rules that granted other WTO members greater rights against China than China had against them–thus violating the core nondiscrimination norm in WTO law–particularly galling provisions given China’s legacy of ‘unequal treaties’ with imperialist powers. China was also forced to accept market access tariff commitments far deeper than any comparable economy: the imposition of tariffs on trade goods reduced to 10% by 2008, for example, while richer Brazil agreed to 31% and India, 48%. China was also required to make broader and deeper commitments on services liberalization in key sectors like financial, telecommunication, professional, and distribution services than any comparable economy.


2018-03-29 on technode

Erm, guest notification is the rule across SE and NE Asia and China and has been for generations. Requiring Airbnb to conform is simply good housekeeping.


2018-03-29 on technode

‘The organization with the most disputes brought to court was Alibaba with its Tmall and Taobao platforms. 17.92% of cases were brought against sellers on these sites. ‘

Which reflects Alibaba’s overall market share, no?

Watch complaints and disputes diminish each year as Social Credit kicks in. That’s going to be fun, given that the Chinese are already the most trusting people on earth.. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-03-27 on ceprnet

The CIA trusts the Chinese government’s PPP figures. Perhaps you know better?

The ‘method’ can be applied to all countries but not all countries include the same data in their baskets–the UK includes prostitution, for example, while the US and China do not.

Why would you trust the Asian Development Bank more than the Chinese Government, the most trusted government on earth? Do you have special insights that the CIA, the WTO and the Chinese people (smarter, better educated and more widely traveled than us) do not?


2018-03-27 on ceprnet

Thanks for that very useful reference.

The quote you selected, however, does not support your original statement, “China’s statistical arm refused to cooperate with the folks calculating PPP”.

The entire report was conducted with China’s cooperation and assistance, but “China expresses reservations over some aspects of the methodology employed and does not agree to publish the headline results for the People’s Republic of China (PRC)”.

Why did China express reservations? Because China’s economic basket has very different components from the current standard created and used by the USA in calculating PPP.

There is, for example, ten times more private real estate construction in China than in the US but real estate contributes only six percent to China’s basket while American construction represents fifteen percent of its GDP. Chinese economists count urban housing at its purchase price amortized over fifty years and ignore a billion square meters of new rural housing every year. American economists, on the other hand, base their calculations on the imputed cost of renting every owner-occupied home in the country and calculate urban and rural property together–a methodology that horrifies the Chinese, who explicitly warn agains treating domestic housing as market-based, since they want it seen as a necessary good. (Since 97% of their poorest people own their homes free and clear, it’s a policy we might consider).

For cultural and political reasons (Communists don’t have servants), China also excludes from calculations fifty-million live-in nurses, babysitters, cleaners, cooks and tutors and women selling jianbing snacks curbside in Beijing who clear $600 a day. It doesn’t count shadow banks either, or a million Uber/Didi drivers, or a hundred million small vendors on Taobao, the six hundred billion dollar e-market.

And outside Beijing and Shanghai all transactions–including automobile and real estate purchases–are conducted in cash by people who’ve been avoiding taxes for two thousand years.

Taking methodological differences into account, Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies calculated that “China’s economy is fifteen percent larger than official figures”. www.csis.org/analysis/broke….

That’s the basis for the statement in the report you referenced, “Using China explicitly as an example, it says that PPP may be off by as much as 15% from the stated number”.

By 2020, China’s GDP will be 50% bigger than ours and Nobelist Robert Fogel says that, by 2040, it will be twice as big as America’s and Europe’s combined.


2018-03-27 on ceprnet

Can you provide a link that substantiates your claim that China didn’t cooperate?

And Xi is the president. The Premier is Li. And neither of them ever said that some of the numbers are complete fiction. That was former Premier Wen, and he was talking about his personal experience as governor of a province, not the nation.

China has been refining its government statistics for 2200 years, they’re the world’s leading mathematicians and statisticians so, unlike the USA, which is constantly having to revise its stats, China has never had to do a single revision.


2018-03-27 on technologyreview

“facial recognition technology” is a good ten years away and of doubtful value, but face recognition technology has already hit the market.


2018-03-27 on ceprnet

Nobody is quite sure how big China’s economy is but Joseph Stieglitz claims that Chinese negotiators had once threatened to walk out if the World Bank released figures revealing that their GDP had surpassed America’s.

A U.S. Federal Reserve report concluded, “Alternative domestic and foreign sources provide no evidence that China’s economic growth is slower than official data indicate”. Though the CIA’s World Factbook shows China’s economy as bigger than America’s, because they calculate GDP differently the question is, how much bigger?

There is, for example, ten times more private real estate construction in China than in the US but real estate contributes only six percent there while American construction represents fifteen percent of GDP. Chinese economists count urban housing at its purchase price amortized over fifty years and ignore a billion square meters of new rural housing every year. American economists, on the other hand, base their calculations on the imputed cost of renting every owner-occupied home in the country.

For cultural and political reasons (Communists don’t have servants), China also excludes from calculations fifty-million live-in nurses, babysitters, cleaners, cooks and tutors and women selling jianbing snacks curbside in Beijing who clear $600 a day. It doesn’t count shadow banks either, or a million Uber/Didi drivers, or a hundred million small vendors on Taobao, the six hundred billion dollar e-market. And outside Beijing and Shanghai all transactions–including automobile and real estate purchases–are conducted in cash by people who’ve been avoiding taxes for two thousand years.

Taking methodological differences into account, Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies calculated that China’s economy is fifteen percent larger than official figures and the Peterson Institute of International Economics went further, estimating[1] that it’s twenty-seven percent bigger and on track for $29 trillion in 2020: fifty percent larger than America’s. In 2006, for example the economy accelerated at twelve percent and grew by $761 billion and GDP was $7.6 trillion. A decade later, in 2016, the economy accelerated at 6.7 percent and grew by $1.3 trillion and GDP was $21 trillion.

[1] Is China Already Number One? New GDP Estimates. Arvind Subramanian (PIIE). January 13, 2011 5:15 PM


2018-03-27 on ceprnet

China cooperates wholeheartedly with every legitimate international body and none of them has ever complained that it does not. Nor has any of them EVER discounted China’s data.


2018-03-27 on ceprnet

Just as ‘The cause of the decline in manufacturing in America was bad government and business policy causing the lack of business innovation/investment’, so the cause of the rise in manufacturing in China was good government and sound business policy causing rising business innovation/investment.


2018-03-25 on foreignpolicyjournal

Antonio, China’s outgoing FDI may be falling but its GDP growth is not. In constant dollars, its economy will grow twice as much this year than it did ten years ago.

Confusing the acceleration rate of China’s economy with its growth is misleading and tells us absolutely nothing useful. 6.9%, for example, is not a measure of anything. It’s a ratio which, when multiplied with last year’s GDP, gives us the value we call growth.


2018-03-25 on theduran

After his retirement a friend asked Nixon why he resigned in the face of accusations that he could have refuted? “I didn’t want to go out like Jack,” he replied. ‘Jack,’ of course, was his old nemesis, Jack Kennedy.


2018-03-21 on mintpressnews

“Putin continues to enjoy overwhelming support in Russia, mostly due to his foreign policy and carefully crafted image.”

IS THIS THE IMAGE YOU’RE REFERRING TO? https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-03-20 on nationalinterest

Agreed. But, strategically, the US cannot afford to lose and its victory would merely support the status quo. Not an attractive scenario.


2018-03-20 on nationalinterest

Peace and freedom and 35 invasions of small, defenseless countries, along with millions of deaths.

As I said, our combo record is 0 for 20


2018-03-20 on lowyinterpreter

The US case becomes weaker with each passing day. Today, according to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The JSTA took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated: it’s spending $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which would put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb.

In January, the United States National Science Foundation reported that the number of scientific publications from China in 2016 outnumbered those from the US for the first time: 426,000 versus 409,000.

China already leads the world in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and quantum secure direct communications.

US IP is becoming less relevant to China’s needs, just as the US–by its own actions–is becoming less relevant to the world.


2018-03-19 on chinalawblog

I see the future of AI in China and the world being dominated by three factors:

1. Human intelligence
2. Computing power
3. Sample size.

Since China is dominant in all three, I see the future of AI being dominated by China.


2018-03-19 on guardianngr

What has happened to our beloved Guardian? Why can it no longer tell a story straight? Whatever happened to that most admirable of British traits, the willingness to applaud a doughty opponent who has bested us? Putin is a hero to his people and rightly so. Let us take a moment to acknowledge his accomplishments. He is the savior of Russia.


2018-03-18 on truthdig

Hmm. The reviewer needs to study up on contemporary China.

Statements like, “he somehow managed to secure permission to go to America on a tour group,” are just plain silly. To secure ‘permission to go to America’ all he needed to do was get an American visa–quite a chore in itself–and a plane ticket, like 130,000,000 of his fellow countrymen who travel abroad each year.

And “Zhuang eventually connected with Chinese pro-democracy activists in Flushing,” make no sense at all. Specifically, after the demonstration the residents of Wukan were asked to choose their own government. They did so and the outcome was just as bad as before. Wukan is riven by clan rivalries going back before the War and may never heal, regardless of its government.

More broadly, ‘pro-democracy activists’ make less sense in China than they do in the USA. China is one of the most democratic countries on earth (the USA has never, ever been a democracy). No matter how you slice it–constitutionally, electively, popularly, procedurally, operationally, substantively or financially–China comes out ahead.

The Carter Center, with offices in Beijing, has been at the heart of China’s democratization for 20 years. In survey after survey, it’s the most trusted government in the world and its policies enjoy the highest democratic support. Don’t believe me? Read ‘Selling Democracy to the Chinese’: https://www.unz.com/article….


2018-03-18 on chinalawblog

Perhaps the writer intended to say, “resumption of Burma’s status as a Chinese tributary state”?
We’re aware that the UK, Germany and Japan are American client states, militarily occupied and their foreign relations dictated by us. But China has no such relationships.


2018-03-18 on npr-dev

742 of the 2,980 National People’s Congress delegates are female, a larger share than America’s Congress but–though women and minority officials are promoted above men with the same experience and accomplishments–there is only one woman, Sun Chunlan, above, on the 25-member Politburo.

Reaching the pinnacle of power requires single-minded, lifelong dedication and men are more available for extra work, more willing to relocate and to sacrifice life balance in favor of their careers (which is why an overwhelming proportion of CEOs, entrepreneurs, politicians and senior executives worldwide are men). Of course, the overwhelming majority of Chinese menial workers in dangerous, labor-intensive jobs are men, too, as are the overwhelming majority of migrant laborers living in subhuman conditions thousands of miles from home and providing for their families.

There are few women in the upper ranks of Chinese politics for the same reason that there are few female U.S. Navy Seals: the Chinese take governance too seriously to make it a gender diversity exercise and Chinese society is nowhere more meritocratic than in government. Reaching the very top is a forty-year extreme marathon involving great physical and mental hardship and those who succeed must do so without gender concessions.

They begin by studying for at least one, if not two postgraduate degrees, graduating in the top two percent, then moving to the Gobi Desert, Inner Mongolia, outer Xinjiang–anywhere with a per capita GDP below five hundred dollars–serving people culturally and intellectually alien to themselves, raising their incomes by fifty percent and earning their loyalty and gratitude.

That’s just the first step and only those who succeed at that level are on the fast track. If anyone can be accused of excluding women from politics, it’s probably their grandmothers.


2018-03-18 on technologyreview

Capital is tertiary: native intelligence and the capacity to organize it are primary and secondary.

Almost none (under 10%) of China’s growth has been funded from capital markets and few, if any, American corporations today raise growth funds from capital markets.


2018-03-17 on wsws

Weirdly of a piece with the current media campaign against Russia’s alleged poisoning of a washed-up British spy: no motive, no evidence, just hysterical condemnation. We seem to be well down a slippery slope.


2018-03-17 on wsws

Voice of America says, “In 1995 China enacted a labor law granting all workers the right to a wage, rest periods, no excessive overtime and the right to carry out group negotiations. Beijing, hoping to push local authorities to address the situation, issued a notice to local governments to make improving labor relations an ‘urgent task’ and work to ensure employees are paid on time and in full, launch programs to provide better labor protections for rural migrant workers and call on employers to improve workplace safety. Although many of those participating in labor protests have been detained, few have been criminally prosecuted”.

Criminal prosecution of workers is almost unheard of in China. In 2009 Jianlong Group bought Tonghua Iron & Steel Works and the new CEO threatened to fire three thousand employees. The steelworkers beat him to death on the spot and, at the judicial inquiry, the union pointed out that, since the man had threatened their livelihood, workers had acted in self-defense. The investigating magistrate declined to prosecute.

China’s labor unions, whose 130 million members outnumber the rest of the world’s combined, have persuaded the government to ratify four of eight UN Labor Conventions (the U.S. has ratified two), two of four Governance Conventions (the U.S., one) and twenty-two of 177 Technical Conventions (the U.S., eleven). Corporations must negotiate with unions and, since all employees work under written contracts, China’s termination for cause law forces employers to maintain detailed regulations and careful discipline records. The Labor Contract Law permits employers to unilaterally terminate employees with severance only if they remain incompetent after training or assignment to a different position. Labor courts interpret the law strictly and defiant employers invariably suffer adverse consequences.


2018-03-17 on technologyreview

Neither China nor the US depends on its equity capital market, and neither market has any direct relevance to their economies. They are ornamental. Irrelevant.


2018-03-17 on technologyreview

A country does not gain the lead in a discipline by copying. Leadership is accomplished by doing original work.

China leads in the sciences and technologies by doing original work.

It is ahead of America in them and has no need to copy America or anyone.

And, BTW, their economy is 50% bigger and growing 300% faster.


2018-03-17 on technologyreview

““The most interesting thing is the depth of thinking, the breadth of thinking, from policy makers, research institutes, and tech companies,” Ding says. “It vastly exceeds what I expected going in.”

Professor Ding is clearly not au fait with China’s recent progress.

According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb.

In January, the United States National Science Foundation reported that the number of scientific publications from China in 2016 outnumbered those from the US for the first time: 426,000 versus 409,000.

45% of technical papers published in the USA have a Chinese co-author.

Chinese scientist Bai Chunli has been re-elected as the president of the World Academy of Sciences for another two years. http://www.china.org.cn/chi…

China leads the world in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and quantum secure direct communications.


2018-03-16 on projectongovernmentoversight

“Over 200 years ago, our Founding Fathers faced a question: How could they build a democracy to withstand the trials of time and survive the pressures that destroyed those that came before?”

The Founding Fathers faced no such question. They didn’t ask it because they loathed democracy, and nor did anyone else except the despised Tom Paine. The question our FF faced was this: “How do we retain our privileges without being subject to the random intervention of hereditary rulers?”

Their answer was our Constitution, which did the job admirably. The One Percent still rule.


2018-03-16 on technode

As the Social Credit program kicks in, interactions like these will skyrocket.


2018-03-16 on nationalinterest

The CIA’s World Factbook gives China’s 2017 economy as $23.2 trillion (vs. America’s $19.4T), a 20% difference.

But China, for philosophical and political reasons, counts GDP differently from the US, as most countries do, incidentally. It does not count income from prostitution, for example, as the UK does.

The right wing Peterson Institute of International Economics applied living and production costs differentials between China and the U.S. to estimate the actual size of China’s economy, which increased China’s 2010 GDP by 27 percent (close to the estimated undervaluation of the renminbi at 30 percent). By using the purchasing power of one US dollar in China compared to the developed world, PPP, and considering the labor income gap between China and other developed economies, the author, Arvind Subrananian, found that the Chinese economy passed the USA’s in 2010, when they were both around $14.5 trillion, and is on track for $28.8 trillion in 2020 vs. America’s $19 trillion. http://piie.com/blogs/realt

But that’s just the start. China doesn’t count the revenues generated by millions of single-operator businesses, and millions of online vendors. It doesn’t count private real estate (which makes up 12% of US GDP) and so on.

Fifty percent is a stretch, I admit, but I use it for effect: we’re deluding ourselves about China and, by failing to address it as it is, we’re remaining complacent and, thus falling further behind every day.


2018-03-15 on nationalinterest

I can only dream…


2018-03-15 on townhallcom

How many visits to the DPRK has the author made?
Does he speak, read and write Korean?
Is he familiar with US crimes in the peninsula? The mass murders, biological warfare and crimes against humanity we committed there?


2018-03-15 on nationalinterest

Railguns may win fights, fleets may win battles, but economies win wars–and China’s economy is 50% bigger than ours and growing 300% faster.


2018-03-14 on httpsmoothiex12blogspotcom

“if left to actual real military people in US, chances of Russia and US to settle would grow exponentially.”

Yep, Eisenhower and Zhukov said tat if the Allies would empower them they would settle all outstanding postwar European issues in a week–and they meant it.

Truman, Stalin and Churchill were horrified, of course, but those two guys got on like a house on fire.


2018-03-13 on nationalinterest

Fleets win battles but economies win wars. China’s economy is 50% bigger than ours and growing 300% faster. The rest is details.


2018-03-12 on rollingstone

In real life, the Social Credit system will integrate information by regulating data exchanges and information sharing between different regions and departments, with much of it made public. That doesn’t mean that the information will somehow be crafted into a unified score: that wouldn’t be very useful to anyone.

Information on natural persons’ religious faith, genetics, fingerprints, blood type, illnesses or medical history must NOT be collected as either public or market credit information.The government may have some of this information on file for its citizens, but it is not to be considered in evaluating ‘credit’ no matter how useful it is for predicting compliance with legal obligations.

The Social Credit system’s most significant aspects are:

1. It’s essentially an Amazon Review of everyone by everyone they’ve ever dealt with. It’s exactly like the ‘reviews’ we give friends (behind their backs?), constantly updated in the same ways.

2. It ranks not only every citizen who chooses to participate, but every government official, cop, judge, department, corporation and shoeshine. It’s truly universal. There’s no privileged, hidden operator that’s spared, and no-one pulling the strings.

3. It’s a popular initiative as much as a government initiative: the Chinese are the most trusting people on earth and they’re tired of being scammed online for billions each year. They’re especially trusting of their government which 86% of people say works for everybody and not just for a fortunate few.

4. It’s not just for citizens. Government departments, officials, cops, corporations, Supreme Court justices, Congresspeople–everyone gets social credit if they want it (participation is voluntary). Doesn’t this sound better than our system, where private corporations rate us and sell the information to other private corporations and government agencies without our permission and with limited access–but offer no reciprocity? Ask TRW for a vendor rating and see how far you get.

5. It’s 90% carrot and 10% stick: the higher your score the easier your life becomes. Japan and the Netherlands, for example, now offer expedited visa processing for Chinese travelers with scores above 750. Landlords waive deposits if you’re over 800…and so on.

6. It’s part of China’s 2,000-year-old plan to create a datong society in which (to be brief) everybody is taken care of and nobody needs to lock their doors at night–a goal that every Chinese supports and which the government hopes to deliver by 2049. That means they have to hustle.

In short, our media are interpreting yet another Chinese policy in Western terms. China is nothing like us. Nothing. It’s a different civilization and it does things differently.


2018-03-11 on bloombergview

Be a man. Address the data.


2018-03-09 on technologyreview

This guy specializes in it and has a newsletter: https://china-social-credit…


2018-03-09 on mintpressnews

We (and that includes Jay Syrmopoulos) belong to the Roman political tradition of amateur government by amoral people who are skillful, self-seeking liars.

That has been the case in the West for 2,500 years and it’s hard for us to imagine a culture in which people trust their government to govern and are grateful to it for the benefits they receive from it.

China’s political culture is even older: its spiritual founder, the (historically real) Duke of Zhou, ruled three thousand years ago and, along with his exemplary government, left as his legacy The Mandate of Heaven, which still guides Chinese politics today.

The Mandate, inter alia, requires leaders to rule by virtuous example and followers to overthrow them if they don’t but otherwise to respect and obey them.

Right now, China has virtuous leaders. Singapore’s founder, Lee Kwan Yew, himself an exemplary leader, knew China’s President, Xi Jinping, since he was a boy and said of him, “I would put him in the Nelson Mandela’s class of persons. A person with enormous emotional stability who does not allow his personal misfortunes or sufferings affect his judgment. In other words, he is impressive.” http://world.time.com/2007/…

Xi has brought immense benefits to his 1.4 billion people and taken nothing in return and, in the opinion of 99% of Chinese, it would be madness not to cooperate with him and show him the respect due to a family elder and persuade him to stay on as long as possible.


2018-03-08 on theconservativewoman

It was (and is) also true.


2018-03-08 on theconservativewoman

Have you been to any tourist destination lately? I was on Australia’s Gold Coast last month: wall to wall Chinese. Now I’m in Chiang Mai, Thailand and, guess what? My hotel manager says his most expensive suites are booked solid through August by… Chinese.

This may explain it: China’s 252 million urban families have higher average net worth than America’s 151 million households–and their net worth is increasing by 9% annually.

It’s a whole new world.


2018-03-08 on thehill-v4

“What they also have is a sophisticated, long-range, long-term operation in the United States to steal our intellectual property.”??

The USA has very little IP to interest China today. * According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb.

* In January, the United States National Science Foundation reported that the number of scientific publications from China in 2016 outnumbered those from the US for the first time: 426,000 versus 409,000.

* 45% of technical papers published in the USA have a Chinese co-author.

* Chinese scientist Bai Chunli has been re-elected as the president of the World Academy of Sciences for another two years. http://www.china.org.cn/chi…

* China leads the world in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and quantum secure direct communications.


2018-03-08 on bulletinoftheatomicscientists

China’s SCS development has harmed nobody. America, on the other hand, has killed millions and is still massacring civilians in Africa and the Middle East every day.


2018-03-08 on bulletinoftheatomicscientists

“Although the United States has been the trailblazer in quantum science, China’s advances and ambitions are starting to challenge the traditional US lead”??

Starting to challenge? Starting? China seems to be far ahead already with the pedal to the metal.


2018-03-08 on technologyreview

” There are plans for a “social credit system” that would track and score citizens’ everyday behavior with a view to perks or punishment.”?

That’s not a fair description of the Social Credit program.

Social Credit is a popular initiative: the Chinese are the most trusting society on earth yet don’t have credit ratings so they’re tired of being scammed online for billions each year.

First, they trust the government–not private credit agencies like Equifax–to run projects that impact everyone because they trust their government far more than we trust ours: 86% of them say it works for everybody and not just for a fortunate few.

Second, Social Credit doesn’t just rate citizens. It rates everyone from government departments and individual officials to cops, corporations, Supreme Court justices, Congresspeople–absolutely everyone and every enterprise gets a social credit rating that arises naturally from their interactions with others.

Third, doesn’t this sound better than being secretly rated by private corporations who sell your information to other private corporations and secretly share it with government agencies–without your permission? And charge us for access to our own information? And offer no reciprocity? Ask TRW for a vendor’s credit history and current rating and what it costs you.

Fourth, Social Credit is 90% carrot and 10% stick: the higher your score the easier your life becomes. Japan and the Netherlands already offer expedited visa processing for tourists with scores above 750 and landlords and car rentals waive deposits if you’re over 800. It’s intended to be a magic carpet for those who play straight with everyone they encounter.

Fifth: all the rules are public and anyone can play and all changes to your SC rating are transparent to you, in real time. For free.

Sixth: China already has a prototype running, an online Social Credit Arbitration Court where, for a few dollars, you can have your case heard and receive a binding verdict that corrects mistakes. Millions of people use it and are refining it. It will go national in 2020.

Seventh, There’s an idealistic element: it’s part of China’s 2,000-year-old plan to create a ‘datong’ society in which (to be brief) everybody is taken care of and nobody needs to lock their doors at night: a goal every Chinese supports and which the government hopes to deliver by 2120. Imagine the effects of 100 years of Social Credit on the entire culture…

Customers applying for visas for developed countries, like Luxembourg or Japan, with scores above 750 need not submit bank records and enjoy perks like expedited airport security checks: a consumers’ magic carpet that reduces transaction fees and credit losses and builds consumer confidence. By 2018, more than 1,100 government officials had been blacklisted.

Corporations with strong social credit can expect government contracts and low-interest loans and raises small corporations’ credit if they observe consumer and product safety regulations, while debiting them for unreliability, dishonesty, excess emissions and even poor worker safety. Regulators say that, when the system becomes integrated it will generate corporate scorecards directly from sensor data, CCTV cameras, government and court records and consumer reviews.

The program comes with a sting in its tail, as Oxford University’s Rogier Creemers says, “When rules are broken and not rectified in time you are entered in a list of ‘people subject to enforcement for trust breaking’ and denied access to things. Rules broken by corporations can lead to them being unable to issue corporate bonds and individuals being unable to become company directors. Trust-breakers can face penalties on subsidies, career progression, asset ownership and the ability to receive honorary titles from the Chinese government. Those who fail to repay debts are punished by travel restrictions”.

A typical travel restriction made the news in 2017 when a real estate developed attempted to book a first class ticket to London and found that the system would only issue him a tourist seat. When he investigated he found that his restriction stemmed from several court judgements whose penalties he had not paid. By 2018, the People’s Court had banned six million defaulters from traveling by air and was working with government departments to ensure that they would be ‘limited on multiple levels’. A local court got creative: when someone calls a delinquent debtor in Dengfeng, Henan Province, instead of a ringtone they hear, “The person you are calling is listed as dishonest by the Dengfeng People’s Court. Please urge them to fulfill their obligations”.


2018-03-08 on bloombergview

Do you understand ad hominem? What is the relevance of your questions? What do they have to do with this conversation?


2018-03-08 on theconservativewoman

“He was a fervent ethno nationalist who focussed on allowing the immigration of fellow Chinese rather than that of other ethnic groups.”?

Malaya excommunicated Singapore because it had too many minorities. Lee begged them not to do it.

Singapore’s ethnic makeup today remains pretty much as it was then: Chinese 76.8%, Malay 13.9%, Indian 7.9%, Other 1.4%


2018-03-07 on bloombergview

Nah. Chinese workers now cost employers as much as Americans and they’re still eating our lunch. I suspect that the blame lies with management’s tendency to asset-strip and pocket the increased ‘profits’ as bonuses and stock appreciation.


2018-03-07 on theconservativewoman

If you know nothing about possible alternatives, it is hard not to approve of what you have. But if 600,000,000 of you have traveled abroad in the past decade and have access to Western media, you DO know about possible alternatives.

Among other things, you know that 97% of your poor people own their homes, that there is no urban poverty or homelessness and that–in ABSOLUTE terms–you have fewer hungry and incarcerated people than America and that, if there’s trouble, your unarmed police will handle it.

Every Chinese knows these simple truths. How many people in the West know them? Did you?

Who’s censoring whom here?


2018-03-07 on theconservativewoman

The surveys are conducted by the most experienced, professional firms on earth–all of whom have contracts with the US Government for other work and thus, are not motivated to give positive reports about China. NONE of them has EVER found or reported the phenomena you refer to. If you want to know more, you can write them directly, as I often do, and query them about their findings.

Of course, we’re all wary about publicly expressing our feelings about some things in public, and no doubt the Chinese are, too. But the findings go back decades and, more importantly, match the government’s performance 100%. They are not isolated data points, or anecdotes: they are series that have involved generations of people and hundreds of thousand of them.


2018-03-07 on theconservativewoman

May he rest in peace.


2018-03-07 on theconservativewoman

“A majority of the people responding to those surveys were probably too terrified of the consequences to criticise their government.”?
The Chinese people criticize their government more viciously than we do.

Article 41 of the Constitution guarantees that, “Citizens of the People’s Republic of China have the right to criticize and make suggestions regarding any State organ or functionary. Citizens have the right to make to relevant State organs complaints or charges against, or exposures of, any State organ or functionary for violation of law or dereliction of duty; but fabrication or distortion of facts for purposes of libel or false incrimination is prohibited. The State organ concerned must, in a responsible manner and by ascertaining the facts, deal with the complaints, charges or exposures made by citizens. No one may suppress such complaints, charges and exposures or retaliate against the citizens making them. Citizens who have suffered losses as a result of infringement of their civic rights by any State organ or functionary have the right to compensation in accordance with the provisions of law”.

In line with the guarantee, Harvard’s Gary King found, “Contrary to much research and commentary, the purpose of the censorship program is not to suppress criticism of the state or the Communist Party. Indeed, despite widespread censorship of social critics, we find that when the Chinese people write scathing criticisms of their government and its leaders the probability that their post will be censored does not increase. Instead, censored tweets were equally likely to be against the state, for the state, or irrelevant or factual reports about events”. In another study, his colleague, Tony Saich, who has been analyzing individual expression in China’s social media for years, found ‘negative, even vitriolic criticism of the state, its leaders and its policies are not more likely to be censored’.

But an essay by blogger Zhang Wumao (张五毛) titled Beijing Has 20 Million People Pretending to Live Here–describing how Beijing has become overrun by ‘outsiders’ and no longer belongs to ‘old Beijingers,’–was censored after it went viral on social media and sparked wide debate on life in the capital. The censor explained that it polarizes relations between Beijing’s locals and disadvantaged immigrants. China blocks Facebook and Twitter only because, after Uyghur terrorists used Facebook to organize a riot and murdered 200 women and children, Facebook refused to assist in identifying the terrorists whereas, in 2013, after a bomb killed three people in Boston, Facebook played a vital role in catching the terrorists through their online accounts.

Government intervention in media is not unique to China and media independence everywhere is more aspirational than real. America’s wealthy media owners depend on government forbearance and tax subsidies and for journalists, as former New York Times Head of Editorial Staff, John Swinton, once told[1] the Press Club, “There is no such thing in America as an independent press. You know it and I know it. There is not one of you who dares to write your honest opinions and, if you did, you know beforehand that it would never appear in print. I am paid weekly for keeping my honest opinion out of the paper I am connected with. Others of you are paid similar salaries for similar things, and any of you who would be so foolish as to write honest opinions would be out on the streets looking for another job”. As Noam Chomsky points out, “Control of thought is more important for governments that are free and popular than for despotic and military states. The logic is straightforward: a despotic state can control its domestic enemies by force, but as the state loses this weapon, other devices are required to prevent the ignorant masses from interfering with public affairs, which are none of their business…the public are to be observers, not participants, consumers of ideology as well as products.” [1] Labor’s Untold Story. Richard O. Boyer and Herbert M. Morais. United Electrical, Radio & Machine Workers of America, NY, 1955/1979.

“Document No. 9” is a fraud, like the Protocols of Zion.

Censorship hasn’t changed under Xi, nor have the rules, which are pretty much the same as ours.

Activists such as Xu Zhiyong, as well as numerous others who identified with the New Citizens’ Movement belong to the US-trained and funded Fengrui Law Firm, which includes lawyers as the core organizers and social media celebrities and petitioners who are in charge of planning and implementation.

Zhai Yanmin, a major organizer of the group, said, “They yelled in court so as to put pressure onto judges. Once they were removed from the courtroom, they would meet with petitioner’s onsite, who carried signs and shouted slogans to keep pressuring judges and sway court decisions. ”

The police statement says the organizers have disrupted public order and sought profits by hiring protesters and swaying court decisions in the name of “defending justice and public interests.” Petitioners took part in these incidents because they not only received payment but also received more attention for their own court cases from government officials.

One of them, a suspect surnamed Ning said, “They told us that we can arouse attention by participating in those protests. If we were present (at sites of controversial incidents), the local government would be informed, which will help us solve problems of our own as higher-ranked officials would urge local government (to handle our complaints). ”

The group is accused of organizing more than 40 controversial incidents since July 2012. One of the recent high-profile cases was related to the shooting incident in Qingan County in northeast China. A man named Xu Chunhe was shot dead in May at a local railway station after attacking a police officer several times despite the officer’s multiple warnings. Lawyers from Fengrui Law Firm then spread rumors that the police officer was directed to open fire because Xu was a petitioner. The firm further spread online rumors that the incident was a murder conspiracy and organized several protests. Zhou Shifeng, director of Fengrui Law Firm, has been arrested, along with Wu Gan and Zhai Yanmin. You can watch the incident here: https://youtu.be/q8Jib5Q3NGg.

We in the West have inherited the Roman political tradition: ruthless, unqualified men lie their way to the top and we resist them or ignore them as best we can. That’s not the Chinese way.

For 2,000 years they’ve sifted out their smartest, most competent, most honest men to run the country professionally and then–guess what?–they trust them to get on with the job. They don’t insult them anymore than they casually insult their grandfathers in public (in private, it’s another matter).

Xi Jinping is an outstanding example of what results from this. Lee Kwan Yew, Founder of Singapore, knew Xi as a boy and said, “I would put him in the Nelson Mandela’s class of persons. A person with enormous emotional stability who does not allow his personal misfortunes or sufferings affect his judgment. In other words, he is impressive.”

So, no, don’t denigrate or disparage someone who gave everyone a 50% wage and pension rise in his first term while wiping out urban poverty and founding the BRI. If some ignorant asshole who’s never done anything for anyone wants to criticize him, let him do it over a beer, with friends, not in public.

You will notice that the picture I paint of Chinese government officials accords with the Chinese public’s opinion of them. I suggest you listen to them, not Fox News.


2018-03-07 on theconservativewoman

Recycled, unsupported allegations from Fox News like these don’t explain Chinese realities–and don’t help us grapple with our own problems. It’s better to ask the Chinese themselves–and yes, anyone can run polls and surveys in China without permission. Harvard University, Gallup, Edelman and Pew Charitable Trusts do it all the time. The results might surprise you, too. Here are a few:

1. According to World Values Surveys, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese thought their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

2. The Edelman 2016 Report found that 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government on earth. https://www.slideshare.net/… .

3. When people are asked if they agree with the statement “most people can be trusted” World Value Survey found that interpersonal trust in China is almost as high as Sweden’s. https://ourworldindata.org/…

4. Pew Charitable Trusts found that “Nine in ten Chinese are happy with the direction of their country (87%), feel good about the current state of their economy (91%) and are optimistic about China’s economic future (87%).” http://www.pewglobal.org/da….

Remember: China has lifted 800 million people out of poverty in the past 40 years and today, China’s 256 million urban families have a higher average net worth than American families. And…as you may have noticed, 600 million Chinese have traveled abroad in the past ten years, and all of them can watch CNN, the BBC and other Western media whenever they wish.

Oh, and Xi Jinping? Conservative icon, Singapore’s Lee Kwan Yew called him, “China’s Nelson Madela; a man of extraordinary moral character”.


2018-03-07 on dailyreckoning

“China has $1 trillion or more in bad debts waiting to explode. These bad debts permeate the economy.”

Bullshit. BIS figures show that China has one of the lowest debt burdens on earth.

And as to the old meme, “A bad thing will soon happen to China”? That’s bullshit, too. Take a look:

1990. The Economist. China’s economy has come to a halt.

1996. The Economist. China’s economy will face a hard landing

1998. The Economist: China’s economy enters a dangerous period of sluggish growth.

1999. Bank of Canada: Likelihood of a hard landing for the Chinese economy.

2000. Chicago Tribune: China currency move nails hard landing risk coffin.

2001. Wilbanks, Smith & Thomas: A hard landing in China.

2002. Westchester University: China Anxiously Seeks a Soft Economic Landing

2003. New York Times: Banking crisis imperils China

2004. The Economist: The great fall of China?

2005. Nouriel Roubini: The Risk of a Hard Landing in China

2006. International Economy: Can China Achieve a Soft Landing?

2007. TIME: Is China’s Economy Overheating? Can China avoid a hard landing?

2008. Forbes: Hard Landing In China?

2009. Fortune: China’s hard landing. China must find a way to recover.

2010: Nouriel Roubini: Hard landing coming in China.

2011: Business Insider: A Chinese Hard Landing May Be Closer Than You Think

2012: American Interest: Dismal Economic News from China: A Hard Landing

2013: Zero Hedge: A Hard Landing In China

2014. CNBC: A hard landing in China.

2015. Forbes: Congratulations, You Got Yourself A Chinese Hard Landing.

2016. The Economist: Hard landing looms for China

2017. National Interest: Is China’s Economy Going To Crash?


2018-03-07 on technode

Many thanks, Peter. Our system, on the other hand, inflames such commentary while ensuring that it is impotent and that nothing changes.


2018-03-07 on technode

Emma, can you dig up some Zhihu posts that attracted government censure? It’s difficult for Westerners to figure out what censors dislike.


2018-03-07 on bloombergview

It’s the best it has ever been since capitalism was introduced. And rapidly becoming a non-issue.


2018-03-06 on bloombergview

Where’s your evidence?


2018-03-06 on bloombergview

Get a grip. 90% of New York Residents Believe the Authorities Are Corrupt http://www.fort-russ.com/20…

The U.S. wastes on corruption most of the money it spends on it military, just as it does for health care, education and for other government functions. The higher the governmental level is (such as in the White House, and in the Pentagon), the bigger the percentage of waste is, because the skimming is monumental at those levels. And for recent U.S. Presidents, they and the foundations they set up suck in billions of dollars, as delayed ‘compensation’ for the favors that the former President had thrown to the ‘donating’ billionaire.

According to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese thought their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

Trust. According to the Edelman 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/… .

China will establish an audit system by 2020 that matches the country’s modern governing system and capacity, with full, transparent coverage of public funds, state assets, state-owned resources and economic responsibility of government officials. http://www.china.org.cn/chi…


2018-03-06 on bloombergview

Rule of law is alive and well in China as nowhere else. Between 2012-2016, violent crime fell forty-three percent (road fatalities dropped fifty-six percent) and satisfaction with public security rose from eighty-seven percent to ninety-two percent making China one of the most trusting, law-biding societies on earth.

When Harvard’s Tony Saich asked the public to prioritize their concerns, they ranked ‘Maintenance of Social Order’ highest and, when he asked which government service they were most satisfied with they again placed ‘Maintenance of Social Order’ first.

Today, after the most lawless century in Chinese history, death penalties are declining and the Social Credit campaign promises to create a smooth transition to a just, xiaokang society.


2018-03-06 on bloombergview

“What should surprise us even less is increasing authoritarianism in China, or that economic growth there hasn’t been accompanied by democracy.”

Erm, the Carter Center, with an office in Beijing, has been at the heart of China’s democratization for 20 years. The result? China is now the world’s leading democracy.

No matter how you slice it–constitutionally, electively, popularly, procedurally, operationally, substantively or financially–China comes out ahead.

In survey after survey, it’s the most trusted government in the world and its policies enjoy the highest support.

Find that hard to believe? Just read ‘Selling Democracy to the Chinese’: https://www.unz.com/article….


2018-03-06 on wsws

“In reality, the vast majority of the population has had no say in the decision. It will entrench Xi as a Bonapartist figure presiding over a regime confronting worsening economic and social problems at home and the growing threat of US trade war and war.”

China has term limits for the same reason America does: both countries’ elites found that their most capable leaders–Roosevelt and Mao–were too sympathetic to ordinary citizens, who returned their affections. Other countries have unlimited terms for their top leaders: Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is in his fourth term and Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel has been in office for more than 12 years. No one in the West has ever criticized these countries’ unlimited terms of leadership because they are democracies.

The removal of the time limit for this titular position of ‘President’ (only useful for chairing the Standing Committee) must be seen along with the proposal for a new State Organ – a watchdog agency called the National Supervisory Commission, which serves to check and balance all public offices against abuse. The NSC is joint government/civil entity, implying representation from the non-government sector, involving non-Party folk in the decision making process. This watchdog agency will codify the anti-corruption drive started by President Xi and create a legal framework that should last beyond his term. According to the CPC document, the new supervisory organ will be listed together with the administrative, judicial and procuratorial organs of the State.

There are no ‘term limits’ in the CCP. Removing the presidential term limit simply brings it into line with Xi’s other two offices–General Secretary of the CPC and Chairman of the Central Military Commission (CMC)–which have no term limits and are elected or re-elected once every five years. These offices have real power because the Party is above country and government. The General Secretary oversees policies, the CMC chairman controls the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) and People’s Armed Police (PAP), and Prime Minister Li is head of government.

Since Xi is general secretary and CMC chairman, his power or influence would not be affected whether he is president or not.

The Constitution limits the presidency to two terms totaling 10 years because the rule of thumb for membership in the seven-man Politburo Standing Committee (the top collective leadership group from which General Secretaries are selected) is ‘seven up/eight down’: cadres up to 67 years can advance to the PSC and become General Secretary and must otherwise retire.

Deng Xiaoping creatively interpreted the ‘seven up/eight down’ principle to render ineligible an opponent of his policies, Li Ruihuan, who was forced to retire on 2002. Deng then selected or pre-positioned every General Secretary prior to Xi–including Hu Jintao, who became general secretary in 2002, fifteen years after Deng died. Inter alia, this ensured that Deng’s family–a bunch of crooks–were free to make billions. But, though he was a loyal friend of Xi’s father, Deng did not select Xi, who will be 68 on June 15, 2021, a year before his second term ends.

Xi must do a double job: by 2020 he must fulfill the goals of the Reform and Opening program that Deng set in 1980. Looking forward, he must formulate and launch the next 40-year program, especially since it will mean a move away from Deng’s capitalism and return China to its socialist roots.

While American Presidents hire and fire their administrative teams, make war, pardon, imprison, kidnap, torture or assassinate people Chinese leaders, even Mao, are board chairmen only. They can set agenda and direct discussion but, ultimately, must follow to the votes of the seven-man Steering Committee, none of whom they chose or can dismiss–and virtually all Steering Committee decisions are unanimous.

Xi never needed to ‘consolidate power’ nor add to his Constitutional power. He was born famous, to one of China’s most beloved and admired men, his first job out of college was Assistant to the Secretary of Defense, he laid down a stellar, 25-year governance record, has a PhD in Developmental Economics, is married to the most famous woman in China and has always been remarkably honest and blunt. Lee Kwan Yew called him, “China’s Nelson Mandela: a man of remarkable moral character”.

In his first term, among other accomplishments, he raised all wages and pensions by 50%, made corruption unprofitable, made China militarily impregnable, eliminated urban poverty and launched the Belt and Road Initiative. Keeping him on is a no-brainer. According to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese think their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

And according to the Edelman 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/… .

According to the Pew Charitable Trusts, “Nine in ten Chinese are happy with the direction of their country (87%), feel good about the current state of their economy (91%) and are optimistic about China’s economic future (87%)”. http://www.pewglobal.org/da…

On June 1, 2021 Xi will announce that China has reached Deng’s Reform and Opening goal, a basic xiaokang society in which no one is poor and everyone receives an education, has paid employment, more than enough food and clothing, access to medical services, old-age support, a home and a comfortable life–a claim no other country can make. Then he must chart China’s future.

Singapore’s Lee Kwan Yew (who served for 30 years with no term limits) said the primary responsibility of a government leader is to “Paint his vision of the future to his people, translate that vision into policies which he must convince the people are worth supporting and, finally, galvanize them to help him implement them,”

In 2012, Xi painted his vision for Two Centennials: to fix inequality (‘socialist modernization’) by 2035 and to transform China into ‘a great modern socialist country, prosperous, strong, democratic, culturally advanced, harmonious and beautiful’ by 2049. China will definitely be prosperous: American Nobelist Robert Fogel says that, by 2040, its economy will be twice the size of Europe’s and America’s combined.

Because he must paint China’s new vision, colleagues granted Xi ‘core leader’ status in 2017 and will amend the constitution so he and the Prime Minister (who was his main rival in the race to the top) can serve another term and ensure the new era gets off to a good start.

As we watch their performance, let’s keep in mind some good advice from the Huainanzi, given in 221 BC and which both men can quote from memory:

“In a well-governed country, those who discuss policy must be in accordance with the law; those who carry out official matters must be regulated. Superiors evaluate actual performance; officials carry out their work efficiently. Words are not permitted to exceed reality. Actions are not permitted to overstep the law.

“In a disordered country, those who are praised by the multitudes are richly rewarded though devoid of accomplishments. Those who stick to their duties are punished, though free of guilt. The ruler is in the dark and does not understand. Worthies do not offer proposals. Officials form factions; persuasive talkers roam about; people embellish their actions. Those who are taken to be wise devote themselves to artifice and deceit; high officials usurp authority. Cliques and factions become widespread. The ruler is eager to carry out projects that are of no use, while the people look haggard and worn”.


2018-03-05 on bloombergview

China has term limits for the same reason America does: both countries’ elites found that their most capable leaders–Roosevelt and Mao–were too sympathetic to ordinary citizens, who returned their affections. Other countries have unlimited terms for their top leaders: Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is in his fourth term and Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel has been in office for more than 12 years. No one in the West has ever criticized these countries’ unlimited terms of leadership because they are democracies.

The removal of the time limit for this position of ‘President’ (which is only useful for chairing the Standing Committee) must be seen with the proposal for a new 4th State Organ – a new watchdog agency, the National Supervision Commission, which serves to check and balance other public offices against abuse.

The NSC is joint government/civil entity, implying therefore representation from the private arena as well.

This interesting development brings people outside the Communist Party into the decision making process. This watchdog agency will codify the anti-corruption drive started by President Xi and creates a legal framework that should last beyond Xi’s term. According to the CPC document, the new supervisory organ will be listed together with the administrative, judicial and procuratorial organs of the State.


2018-03-05 on truthdig

“US corporations do not do business with governments that engage in the massacre of their own citizens”. Which explains why we don’t do business with, say, Indonesia, Honduras or Venezuela?

“If such bad behavior happens it is covered up and those who question the coverup are said to promote conspiracy theories”. If such bad behavior happens it is covered up by American media, as in the case of Indonesia, Honduras and Venezuela.

“There are no journalists in China and no Mandarin speaking American diplomats who were there when the hammer came down”. There were many American journalists in China during the Tiananmen Square demonstrations, and many American diplomats in the Embassy at the time. If you’re interested in reading their accounts of what happened, why not read them here: https://www.quora.com/Why-d…


2018-03-04 on truthdig

On Planet Fox Chinese officials murder their own children (“Honey, I shot the kids”?) but not in China. Clearly, you didn’t read the corrective coverage.

” in China YOU DON’T KNOW FOR SURE because there are no journalists, and US “intelligence” can’t speak Chinese convincingly”. But, apparently, you do? In fact, the cables were from Chinese-speaking American diplomats based in Beijing.


2018-03-04 on truthdig

IP? * According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb.

* In January, the United States National Science Foundation reported that the number of scientific publications from China in 2016 outnumbered those from the US for the first time: 426,000 versus 409,000.

* 45% of technical papers published in the USA have a Chinese co-author.

* Chinese scientist Bai Chunli has been re-elected as the president of the World Academy of Sciences for another two years. http://www.china.org.cn/chi…

* China leads the world in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and quantum secure direct communications.


2018-03-04 on truthdig

The value of China’s trade with the USA is less than 1% of Chinese GDP.

Exports make up 18% of Chinese GDP. Exports to the US make up 18% of total exports and the retained value of those exports is about 18%.

The retained value is low because most Chinese exports are, in reality, re-exports containing a high percentage of American I.P. China retains less than 9% of the value of an exported iPhone, for example. Though the WTO records the nominal, wholesale, export value of an iPhone as $400, China’s retained share is about $30

The retained value of American exports to China, on the other hand, is 100% of nominal value because the U.S. owns 100% of their I.P. – from genetically modified seeds to CPUs and genome analyzers.

So trade between the two is roughly in balance, perhaps even favoring the USA.

“The fact is that the PRC is an abusive trading partner “. Really?

China is currently our largest goods trading partner with $598 billion in total, two way, goods traded during 2015.

Goods exports totaled $116 billion; goods imports from

China totaled $482 billion.

The U.S. goods nominal trade deficit with China was $366 billion in 2015. But behind the ‘nominal’ label lies an interesting truth:

1. Trade with the world represents only 18% of China’s economy.

2. China’s trade with the U.S. represents only 18% of China’s trade with the world. (China’s economy is less export-dependent than Germany’s, or even Canada’s).

3. China’s export figures to the U.S. are exaggerated because they neglect their underlying IP value.

4. China’s domestic share of an iPhone’s $400 export value is $4, for example. Of China’s $482 billion exports to us, I’m guessing it retains $116 billion in value.

5. The reverse is true for American exports to China, from genetically modified soybeans to computer chips. The U.S. owns 100% of their value, including their I.P. So $116 billion net stays in the USA.

6. We enjoy a healthy trade balance with China that’s probably more beneficial than our trade with the EU, whose IP portfolio rivals ours.

7. Our economy–and our currency–can less afford a $116 billion hit than China’s. Adjusted for PPP, her economy is almost 30% bigger than ours and growing three times faster.

8. China’s economy is much more flexible than ours: when the government announces a policy everyone gets on board, pronto, regardless of short-term sacrifices.

9. Their government is not ‘authoritarian’, it’s Confucian. Like every Chinese government since the birth of Christ. That’s why it gets an 80% trust rating from its people and 93% policy approval. Because it’s a competent Confucian government.

Since all of this is a matter of public record, why do we speak and act as if China were not a most valuable trade partner, and promote and cherish the relationship? Without them, we’d be doomed to the economic equivalent of a nuclear winter.


2018-03-04 on truthdig

1. After Switzerland, China is the world’s second-best democracy–and certainly the biggest. https://www.unz.com/article….

2. Labor unrest is local and not generally tied to overall dissatisfaction because wages have been doubling every decade for 50 years

3. China leads the world in all renewable technologies: both in IP and installation. Air quality is improving daily and water and soil are being fixed


2018-03-04 on truthdig

“There was an element of democratic individualism in China that expressed itself in Tienanmen Square in 1989, which was ruthlessly crushed by the collectivist state. More than 10,000 were murdered so that Xi could eventually declare himself Emperor of the latest dynasty.”

Nobody was killed (or injured) in Tiananmen Square. The kids were demonstrating for a return to the Maoist democracy. The Columbia Journalism Review critiques coverage of Tiananmen:
http://www.cjr.org/behind_t…

US State Department’s cables at the time:
http://www.alternativeinsig…

The Massacre that Wasn’t: http://www.globalresearch.c…

Britain’s Daily Telegraph:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/…

Australian prof. Greg Clark. http://www.gregoryclark.net…

P.S. Want a real massacre? Three years after Tiananmen there was an uprising in Los Angeles that killed 55 people and spread to a dozen cities. Instead of waiting six weeks, as China’s government did, President Bush immediately sent in thousands of troops saying, “There can be no excuse for the murder, arson, theft or vandalism that have terrorized the people of Los Angeles… Let me assure you that I will use whatever force is necessary to restore order”. Your media called the President’s action ‘decisive,’ not the term they’d applied to Tiananmen.


2018-03-04 on wired

The Social Credit program will be built between now and the end of 2020 and, if you want to follow developments I recommend subscribing to this blog: https://china-social-credit…


2018-03-04 on wired

Only in a parallell galaxy, on Planet Fox, does China’s have one of the worst records in human rights or justice.

In this one, China beats America 26-2 on the UN Human Rights Articles: http://www.un.org/en/univer…

And justice? When Harvard’s Tony Saich asked the public to prioritize their concerns, they ranked ‘Maintenance of Social Order’ highest and, when he asked which government service they were most satisfied with they again placed ‘Maintenance of Social Order’ first. Today, after the most lawless century in Chinese history, death penalties are declining and the Social Credit campaign promises to create a smooth transition to a just, xiaokang society.



2018-03-03 on wsws

Five questions about another American attack on North Korea:

1. Why can’t it attack like it did Syria?
The Korean Peninsula technically remains in a state of war. Fighting halted on July 27, 1953 under an armistice signed between Washington and Beijing. If the US initiated an attack, it would break the treaty endorsed by the United Nations.

2. What are the most important differences between North Korea and Syria?
While Syria is believed to have pursued nuclear weapons, North Korea’s nuclear weapons capabilities have matured in recent years. Pyongyang has conducted five nuclear tests and claims it has successfully “miniaturised” nuclear warheads – though such claims have never been independently verified. It experienced a series of embarrassing failures while launching the Musudan intermediate-range ballistic missile last year. Despite that, military experts believe that North Korea learnt from those setbacks and might even be able to develop a nuclear-tipped, intercontinental ballistic missile that can reach the United States within the coming four years, during Trump’s presidency.

3. Why must China stand by North Korea if it is attacked by the US?
China is North Korea’s ally. In 1961, the two countries signed the Sino-North Korean Mutual Aid and Cooperation Friendship Treaty, in which both parties are obliged to offer immediate military and other assistance to the other in the case of an outside attack. This treaty has been prolonged twice, and is valid until 2021.

4. Why does China insist on a peaceful resolution and oppose military option floated by the US?
China is concerned that its border provinces would be inundated with North Korean refugees if the Kim regime collapsed. From a geopolitical point of view, Beijing views North Korea as a buffer zone from the potential encroachment by powers are aligned with the US, including Japan and South Korea.

5. Besides China, which other countries oppose a military strike against Pyongyang?
Both South Korea and Japan prefer non-military option. The South Korean capital, Seoul, is only about 40km from the border and is particularly vulnerable to North Korean attack. Sam Gardiner, a retired Air Force colonel, was quoted by an interview by The Atlantic magazine as saying the US “cannot protect Seoul, at least for the first 24 hours of a war, and maybe for the first 48”. Even though former US president Bill Clinton seriously debated bombing the Yongbyon reactor in 1994, he was convinced by his defence officials that the intensity of combat with North Korea “would be greater than any the world has witnessed since the last Korean War”.


2018-03-03 on breitbartproduction

Human Rights Watch is funded by the only government on earth that uses torture, kidnapping and assassination as state policy. ‘Nuf said.


2018-03-03 on evonomics

“Absorbing this fact leads to a robust conclusion about the design of our own societies. We must learn to function in two capacities: 1) As designers of social and economic systems; and 2) as participants in the systems that we design”.

China’s government seems to function well in both capacities. According to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese thought their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

And according to Edelman’s 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/….


2018-03-03 on wired

In 2014, China’s Brains Trust, the State Council, published “Planning Outline for the Construction of a Social Credit System Through 2020”, proposing to unify and integrate existing surveillance, monitoring, transparency and compliance systems with existing laws and regulations and called for comments from consumers and producers. In preparation for full implementation of the Social Credit system, the government next adopted regulations requiring ethical manufacturing, truthful advertising, secure distribution, honest payment and trustworthy delivery.

In 2017, they required retailers to unquestioningly accept returns within seven days of purchase, pay doubled fines for fraudulent or false advertising and refund customers three hundred percent of the price of counterfeit goods. Nike quickly encouraged consumers to buy fakes, sue sellers and keep their gains and consumer confidence soared: in twenty-four hours on Singles Day, 2018, using personalized live streaming, digital effects and fleeting bargains like $10,000 Maseratis, Alibaba handled 256,000 transactions every second, peddled 140,000 new cars, delivered a billion packages and sold $25 billion worth of goods–more than the GDP of sixty countries. In the midst of the frenzy, an Australian vineyard sold its entire inventory, two vast warehouses of wine, in fourteen hours.

The programs greatly benefited urbanites with bank accounts and credit cards but left the four hundred million rural Chinese who lacked bank accounts with little choice of how and where to purchase goods and borrow money, so the State Council published guidelines encouraging lenders, pawnshops and leasing companies to issue loans to low income people, offering to share the losses until they had established their social credit. But partly because Chinese have never had personal credit scores, fraud costs Chinese $100 billion annually and vendors, lenders and rural consumers were reluctant to take the plunge.

So the Council announced a Social Credit program resembling Amazon’s famous customer reviews, but extended beyond products to manufacturers, vendors, government officials, agencies and individuals. The goal is to ‘promote a harmonious society, establish a culture of sincerity and advance traditional virtues to encourage people to keep trust and punish people breaking trust so as to raise the honesty and, thus, the credit levels of the entire society.

Consumers provide feedback not only on goods and services but their providers, ranking them on a 950-point scale and China Daily talks up the positive side, “After graduation, Zhang Hao, 28, found a job at a securities company in eastern China’s Hangzhou city. On his mobile app Alipay, he saw an apartment he liked. Alipay, Alibaba’s mobile payment service, rates its users’ credit based on their consumption and investment habits on their app. Zhang had a high score and so was exempted from the $1,000 rental deposit and the $200 broker’s fee. The experience not only saved Zhang time and energy in renting an apartment, which is often complicated in China, but also gave him a fresh look at the city where he was about to build a career”.

Social Credit offers more carrots than sticks and penalties are more irritating than punitive. When a realtor in Beijing sued bicycle hire firm Mobike for the costs of dealing with abandoned bikes the court dismissed the claim but advised Mobike to review its policies. The company’s website now reads, “By observing traffic rules and using the bikes properly you will not only maintain a higher Mobike Score but will gain access to even more services in the future. Most importantly, you will play a part in ensuring Mobike remains a safe, orderly and smooth transport network and benefit for the community”. Mobike found that people with low Social Credit scors had abandoned the vast majority of offending bikes and began charging them one hundred times the normal fee and the problem evaporated. The entire travel industry welcomed the program: customers with scores above 750 need not submit bank records when applying for visas and enjoy expedited airport security checks and reduced transaction fees, creating a magic carpet for trustworthy consumers and reducing credit losses for vendors.

Oxford University’s Rogier Creemers says, “When rules are broken and not rectified in time you are entered in a list of ‘people subject to enforcement for trust breaking’ and denied access to things. Rules broken by corporations can lead to them being unable to issue corporate bonds and individuals being unable to become company directors. Trust-breakers can face penalties on subsidies, career progression, asset ownership and the ability to receive honorary titles from the Chinese government. Those who fail to repay debts are punished by travel restrictions”. A property developer attempted to book a first class ticket to London in 2017 could only buy a tourist seat. He found that his restriction stemmed from court judgements for unpaid subcontractors. By 2018, courts had banned six million defaulters from traveling by air and promised they would be ‘limited on multiple levels’ and local court got a creative: instead of a ringtone, callers to delinquent debtors in Dengfeng, Henan Province hear, “The person you are calling is listed as dishonest by the Dengfeng People’s Court. Please urge them to fulfill their obligations”.

The program raises small corporations’ credit if they observe consumer and safety regulations while debiting them for unreliability, dishonesty, excess emissions and even poor worker safety. Regulators say that, when the system becomes integrated it will generate corporate scorecards directly from sensor data, CCTV cameras, government and court records and consumer reviews.

The program tracks individuals who defy judicial or governmental decisions much the way the U.S. Federal Child Support Case Registry tracks defaulters. In 2017 the government started ‘refining black lists and red lists to ensure compliance with legal obligations, technical standards, and contractual obligations by foreign and domestic enterprises, social organizations, administrative organs, and individuals’. Inclusion on the black list attracts consequences like more frequent, in-depth tax inspections and withdrawal of licenses from enterprises, social organizations and individuals and, by June 2018, more than 1,100 government officials had been blacklisted.

Since Social Credit affects even people who opt out of it, the government is explaining each step and garnering feedback: “Construction of a social integrity scheme is a complex systemic project. At present our society suffers from socially unhealthy phenomena like economic disputes, telecommunications fraud, lack of trust and indifference to human feelings. One reason for this is the poor construction of our integrity system. It’s not difficult to understand why or how the construction of an integrity system is important: it should start with the institutional system then make a genuine effort to strengthen social integrity based on honesty, promise-keeping and respect for basic morality and customs”.

The Basic Plan for Social Credit plans to

1. Praise creditworthiness, discipline untrustworthiness: Fully utilize credit incentives and constraints, increasing the extent of incentives for trustworthy entities and of disciplinary actions for seriously untrustworthy entities. Allow trustworthy people and institutions to receive benefits and the untrustworthy be subject to restrictions, thus creating systemic mechanisms for praising honesty and disciplining dishonesty.

2. Coordinate departmental and social action: By disclosing and sharing credit information, establish cross-region, interdepartmental, and cross-sector mechanisms for joint incentives and joint disciplinary action, forming a common governance structure in which government departments coordinate their actions, industry organizes self-discipline and management, credit service organizations actively participate–all broadly supervised by public opinion and feedback.

3. Protect everyone’s rights and interests in accordance with laws and regulations: Strictly follow laws, regulations and policies to scientifically delineate trustworthy and untrustworthy conduct, develop joint incentives for trustworthiness and joint disciplinary action for untrustworthiness.

4. Establish complete mechanisms for credit restoration, objections, appeals and so forth to protect all participants’ lawful rights and interests.

5. Focus on key points, coordinate advancement. Persist in being problem-oriented, striving to resolve credit issues that are currently harmful to the public interest and public safety in key industries, on which many people have given strong feedback, or which have seriously impacted economic and social development.

6. Encourage and support innovations and demonstrations by local people’s governments and relevant departments and gradually expand mechanisms for jointly incentivizing trustworthiness and jointly disciplining untrustworthiness to every area of the economy and society.

If the Social Credit program remains true to its purpose and succeeds, we can expect it to become global within a generation, dramatically reducing friction in international relationships, trade, commerce and travel.


2018-03-03 on bloombergview

“A lot of my economist colleagues are enthusiastic about the promise of the empirical revolution in our field.”

If that were so, they would be studying the Chinese model, the most successful in human history and the most transparent. But not only do they not study it, they are hostile to any suggestion that they do so.


2018-03-02 on wsws

Wow! Glad that’s ending. Thanks.


2018-03-02 on wsws

“There is widespread anti-war sentiment in New Zealand, where thousands of people joined worldwide mass protests against the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Every party in parliament, however, supports NZ’s involvement in Iraq.

Parliamentarians support NZ’s involvement in Iraq because the CIA, thanks to the NSA, has enough dirt on each of them–and enough leverage with NZ media–to have them dismissed and disgraced at will.

That’s why the US insists that everyone use its corruption-fostering political system, which it humorously calls ‘democracy’.


2018-03-02 on wired

I should have been more explicit and written, “Unlike with Equifax and FICO, there’s no privileged, hidden operator that’s spared, no-one pulling the strings.”

It’s administered transparently by the most government on earth, so it’s transparent.


2018-03-02 on insidehighered

It’s paying off in other ways, too. * According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb.


2018-03-01 on wsws

“according to Xi China will visit darkest corners of capitalism on their way to glorious socialism while dropping years ago clause of leading role of Chinese working class in shaping the future from all party literature including its manifesto.”

Rubbish. Xi’s words, deeds, and policies strengthen the leading role of Chinese working class in shaping the future from all party literature including its manifesto. That’s why the Chinese working class loves the guy.


2018-03-01 on wsws

Wow! What an amazing interpretation of events in China! Let’s look at a few of those claims:

1. “The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) regime has made a sharp break from the norms of the past three decades by moving to end the two-term limit for the post of president”. Yeah, sorta. America has term limits for the same reason the Chinese do: both countries’ governing elites found that their most capable leaders–Roosevelt and Mao–were sympathetic to ordinary citizens–who returned their affections.

In real life, within the Chinese Communist Party there are no term limits. The most-quoted rule of thumb for membership in the seven-man Politburo Standing Committee, the top collective leadership group from which General Secretaries are selected, is ‘seven up/eight down’: cadres up to 67 years can advance to the PSC and become general secretary and must otherwise retire: an interpretation of the principle of renewal of the leadership every ten years instituted by Capitalist Roader Deng Xiaoping to get rid of his rival/nuisance, 68-year-old Li Ruihuan.

Deng then selected (or pre-positioned) every General Secretary before Xi–including Hu Jintao, who became general secretary in 2002, fifteen years after Deng Xiaoping died. But, though he was a close and loyal friend of Xi’s father, Deng did not select Xi, who will be 68 on June 15, 2021, a year before his second term ends.

But Xi has a double job. Looking back, he must fulfill the goals that Deng Xiaoping set in 1980: to complete his Reform and Opening program–a 40-year overhaul of China’s economy–by 2020. Looking forward, he must ensure–as Deng did–that he launches the next 40-year program auspiciously, especially since it will be a return to China’s socialist roots.

Comprende?

2. “As a result, Xi Jinping, who has consolidated his control over the military and state apparatus and purged key political rivals over the past five years, will be able remain in office indefinitely”. Xi never needed to consolidate power nor has he needed to add to it since his accession, nor has he EVER had political rivals. He was born famous, to one of China’s most beloved and admired men, his first job out of college was Assistant to the Secretary of Defense. He laid down a stellar, 25-year governance record, has always been famously honest (Lee Kwan Yew called him, “China’s Nelson Mandela” and immensely competent. 95% of Chinese trust him and approve of his policies and would, I expect, support his term extension.

3. “Xi’s emergence as China’s political strongman is not a function of his personal characteristics, but rather is a reflection above all of the extreme social tensions wracking the country. Confronting a deteriorating economy and the prospect of social upheaval, the Chinese bureaucracy is desperately seeking to consolidate its forces around the figure of Xi—a form of rule that Marxists have classically designated as Bonapartist”.

There are no social tensions wracking the country, NONE. According to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese think their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

And according to the Edelman 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/… .

when people are asked if they agree with the statement “most people can be trusted, “Chinese interpersonal trust is as high as Sweden’s. https://ourworldindata.org/…

According to the Pew Charitable Trusts, “Nine in ten Chinese are happy with the direction of their country (87%), feel good about the current state of their economy (91%) and are optimistic about China’s economic future (87%)”. http://www.pewglobal.org/da…


2018-03-01 on grassrootseconomicorganizing

If you’re seriously interested in a media cooperative, I suggest you talk to Ron Unz, at unz.com. He’s the smartest (a PHD physicist), most experienced publisher, has a huge audience and loathes our media.


2018-02-28 on mintpressnews

Meanwhile, in China, inequality is falling really, really fast. We won’t see reliable GINI figures for a few years (they’re the slowest stats to be reported, worldwide) but here’s what we know already:

97% of poor Chinese own their homes, outright.

https://uploads.disquscdn.c… .

Urban poverty and homelessness were eliminated in 2016 and rural poverty will become a memory by 2020.

Wages for poor people have kept pace better in China than in the US: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-02-27 on bloombergview

Term limits guarantee nothing, as Lee Kwan Yew’s 30-year tenure and triumph amply demonstrate.

Elites in both China and the USA imposed term limits after their most beloved leaders exhibited too much sympathy for working people. FDR was America’s greatest and most beloved leader, as was Mao.

Both briefly disciplined their nations’ traditional elites, who never forgave them and have done everything in their power to blacken their names and prevent a recurrence of real democracy.

China has not had a dictatorship since the CCP came to power. America, on the other hand, as Lincoln’s Secretary of State, William Henry Seward, observed, “Elects a king for four years and gives him absolute power within certain limits which, after all, he can interpret for himself”.

While American Presidents hire and fire their administrative teams, make war, pardon, imprison or assassinate enemies Chinese leaders, even Mao, are board chairmen only. They can set agenda and direct discussion but, ultimately, must follow to the votes of the seven-man Steering Committee, none of whom they chose or can dismiss–and virtually all Steering Committee decisions are unanimous.


2018-02-27 on nationalinterest

The ‘future’ this article refers to is already past. * According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb.

* In January, the United States National Science Foundation reported that the number of scientific publications from China in 2016 outnumbered those from the US for the first time: 426,000 versus 409,000.

* 45% of technical papers published in the USA have a Chinese co-author.

* Chinese scientist Bai Chunli has been re-elected as the president of the World Academy of Sciences for another two years. http://www.china.org.cn/chi…

* China leads the world in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and quantum secure direct communications.


2018-02-24 on middleeasteye

Soooo..there’s no espionage against Iran? The charges have no basis because Iran brought them?


2018-02-19 on bloombergview

“That diversity may have worried China’s ruling Communist Party”?? No, that’s how China makes such rapid progress: different companies and provinces experiment with their own ideas and markets then, based on the data, pool best practices and legislate them.

In real life, the Social Credit system will integrate information by regulating data exchanges and information sharing between different regions and departments, with much of it made public. That doesn’t mean that the information will somehow be crafted into a unified score: that wouldn’t be very useful to anyone.

Information on natural persons’ religious faith, genetics, fingerprints, blood type, illnesses or medical history must NOT be collected as either public or market credit information.The government may have some of this information on file for its citizens, but it is not to be considered in evaluating ‘credit’ no matter how useful it is for predicting compliance with legal obligations.

The Social Credit system’s most significant aspects are:

1. It’s essentially an Amazon Review of everyone by everyone they’ve ever dealt with. It’s exactly like the ‘reviews’ we give friends (behind their backs?), constantly updated in the same ways.

2. It ranks not only every citizen who chooses to participate, but every government official, cop, judge, department, corporation and shoeshine. It’s truly universal. There’s no privileged, hidden operator that’s spared, and no-one pulling the strings.

3. It’s a popular initiative as much as a government initiative: the Chinese are the most trusting people on earth and they’re tired of being scammed online for billions each year. They’re especially trusting of their government which 86% of people say works for everybody and not just for a fortunate few.

4. It’s not just for citizens. Government departments, officials, cops, corporations, Supreme Court justices, Congresspeople–everyone gets social credit if they want it (participation is voluntary). Doesn’t this sound better than our system, where private corporations rate us and sell the information to other private corporations and government agencies without our permission and with limited access–but offer no reciprocity? Ask TRW for a vendor rating and see how far you get.

5. It’s 90% carrot and 10% stick: the higher your score the easier your life becomes. Japan and the Netherlands, for example, now offer expedited visa processing for Chinese travelers with scores above 750. Landlords waive deposits if you’re over 800…and so on.

6. It’s part of China’s 2,000-year-old plan to create a datong society in which (to be brief) everybody is taken care of and nobody needs to lock their doors at night–a goal that every Chinese supports and which the government hopes to deliver by 2049. That means they have to hustle.

In short, our media are interpreting yet another Chinese policy in Western terms. China is nothing like us. Nothing. It’s a different civilization and it does things differently.


2018-02-17 on worldfinance

How big is their economy? Nobody is quite sure but Nobelist Joseph E. Stieglitz claimed that Chinese negotiators had once threatened to walk out if the World Bank released figures revealing that their GDP had surpassed America’s and a U.S. Federal Reserve report concluded, “Alternative domestic and foreign sources provide no evidence that China’s economic growth is slower than official data indicate”. Though the CIA’s World Factbook shows China’s economy as bigger than America’s, because they calculate GDP differently the question is, how much bigger?

https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

There is, for example, ten times more private real estate construction in China than in the US but real estate contributes only six percent there while American construction represents fifteen percent of GDP. Chinese economists count urban housing at its purchase price amortized over fifty years and ignore a billion square meters of new rural housing every year. American economists, on the other hand, base their calculations on the imputed cost of renting every owner-occupied home in the country.

For cultural and political reasons (Communists don’t have servants), China also excludes from calculations fifty-million live-in nurses, babysitters, cleaners, cooks and tutors and women selling jianbing snacks curbside in Beijing who clear $600 a day. It doesn’t count shadow banks either, or a million Uber/Didi drivers, or a hundred million small vendors on Taobao, the six hundred billion dollar e-market. And outside Beijing and Shanghai all transactions–including automobile and real estate purchases–are conducted in cash by people who’ve been avoiding taxes for two thousand years.

Taking methodological differences into account, Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies calculated that China’s economy is fifteen percent larger than official figures and the Peterson Institute of International Economics went further, estimating[1] that it’s twenty-seven percent bigger and on track for $29 trillion in 2020: fifty percent larger than America’s. In 2006, for example the economy accelerated at twelve percent and grew by $761 billion and GDP was $7.6 trillion. A decade later, in 2016, the economy accelerated at 6.7 percent and grew by $1.3 trillion and GDP was $21 trillion.

How much has the economy directly benefited ordinary Chinese? In 2006, average annual wages were $5,000; in 2016 average wages were $18,000. Every Chinese real wages have doubled every ten years since 1980 and, by 2020, the country will have fewer poor, malnourished, homeless and imprisoned people than America and, simultaneously, three times more middle-class and rich ones.


[1] Is China Already Number One? New GDP Estimates. Arvind Subramanian (PIIE). January 13, 2011 5:15 PM


2018-02-13 on technode

“Despite the fact that Chinese women have a high level of participation in the workforce not many of them make it to senior positions. Although the numbers are better than in developed countries like the US, we have to wonder, what is stopping Chinese women from grabbing their chance in tech?”

Say whaaaa? In patriarchal China, women are more widely and deeply represented in tech companies than they are in the U.S., which invented tech companies and women executives.

But the takeaway is “what is stopping Chinese women from grabbing their chance in tech?”


2018-02-12 on thewirein

Since its first free and fair, democratic elections, 90% of Indians have consistently voted to be poor and 10% have voted to be rich. Only democracy could work such a miracle of self-denial.


2018-02-11 on bloombergview

Obama’s characterization of Putin as zero-sum seems farfetched, given Putin’s high intelligence, flexibility, success and popularity with other heads of state.
Obama was probably setting up his and Hilary’s Russian Interference plot.


2018-02-05 on fortruss

On the eve of the Tiananmen demonstrations, Deng had Gene Sharp arrested and expelled to British Hong Kong–whence he directed the insurrection, as he recounts in his memoir, Non-Violent Struggle in China.


2018-02-01 on valuewalkcomments

“pesky moral issues of destroying the human concept of freedom might be road kill on China’s path to digital dominance.”???

Anyone who reads the 30 Articles of the UN Declaration of Universal Human Rights will recognize, immediately, that China’s human rights record is far, far better than the USA’s or the EU’s. Of the 30 Articles in the Declaration, China leads 26-2, with two draws: read it and weep:
http://www.un.org/en/univer…


2018-01-31 on security-boulevard-1

What nonsense! As if the Chinese would stoop to the level of the CIA!


2018-01-30 on nationalinterest

Sounds like ad hominem with–as usual–zero data to back it up. In other words, Fox News.


2018-01-30 on nationalinterest

‘Mao Zedong and his fellow revolutionaries made a new state, proud and independent. It was also authoritarian and murderous’.

Rubbish. Mao did more good–and less harm–for more people than anyone in history. Why do you think 10,000,000 people visit his birthplace each year, despite official efforts to discourage them?

When Mao stepped onto the world stage in 1945 his country was convulsed by civil war, Russia had taken Mongolia and a piece of Xinjiang, Japan still occupied three northern provinces, Britain had taken Hong Kong, Portugal Macau, France pieces of Shanghai, Germany Tsingtao, and America dominated the opium trade.

In 1949 China was agrarian, backward, feudalistic, ignorant and violent. Of its four hundred million people, fifty-million were drug addicts, eighty percent could neither read nor write and life expectancy was thirty-five years. Peasants paid seventy percent of their produce in rent, women’s feet were bound, desperate mothers sold their children in exchange for food and poor people, preferring slavery to starvation, sold themselves. U.S. Ambassador John Leighton Stuart reported that, during his second year in China, ten million people starved to death in three provinces. The Japanese had killed twenty-million and General Chiang Kai-Shek wrote that, of every thousand youths he recruited, barely a hundred survived the march to training base.

By 1974 Mao had doubled the population, doubled life expectancy, reunited, reimagined, reformed and revitalized the largest, oldest civilization on earth, modernized it after a century of failed modernizations, liberated more women than anyone in history and ended thousands of years of famines. A strategist without peer, political innovator, he was a master geopolitician and a Confucian peasant, under crushing embargoes Mao had grown GDP by 7.3 percent annually and left the country debt-free.

Harvard’s professor of Chinese Studies, John King Fairbank, summarized[1] his legacy: “The simple facts of Mao’s career seem incredible: in a vast land of 400 million people, at age 28 with a dozen others to found a party and in the next fifty years to win power, organize, and remold the people and reshape the land–history records no greater achievement. Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne, all the kings of Europe, Napoleon, Bismarck, Lenin–no predecessor can equal Mao Tse-tung’s scope of accomplishment, for no other country was ever so ancient and so big as China. Indeed Mao’s achievement is almost beyond our comprehension”. [1] The United States and China

These three articles examine each of Mao’s most famous campaigns:
http://www.unz.com/article/…
http://www.unz.com/article/…
http://www.unz.com/article/…


2018-01-29 on spectator-org

“The deeper problem is that the national government is among the least trusted institutions in the U.S. today. The polls demonstrate lack of trust for the government as a whole, with the social media savvy president distrusted by 63 percent”.

The same polls (Gallup, Edelman) in China demonstrate almost complete trust in the Chinese government as a whole, at 96%.

China are pioneering Social Credit because people trust their government.

https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2018-01-27 on thewirein

“India’s situation is rapidly approaching that of China, whose wrong-headed political and economic policies are an inspiration for our elites and middle classes. Three decades of rapid growth has thrust that nation into what has been described as a ‘communist-capitalist ecological apocalyspe‘ which now threatens to undo its economic achievements.”

Rubbish. China now invests more in clean energy each year than America and Europe combined and, in 2017, installed more than half the world’s new solar and wind capacity and intends to increase sustainable energy’s share by more than eight percent each year through 2030. Beijing has shut down all the coal-burning power plants that provided electricity to its twenty-three million inhabitants and announced a switchover date to electric cars. The city’s mayor promised that, by 2020, fifty-six percent of days will have good air quality, PM2.5 density will be one third of Delhi’s and thirty percent lower than it was in 2015 and, by 2030, clean energy will provide ninety percent of the city’s needs. Thanks to geography, prosperity and its role as the nation’s capital and showcase, Beijing has the money and the motive to transform its air quality–and the smarts to earn back the cost by developing sustainable, exportable technologies.

Greenpeace data shows China’s 2015 growth in wind and solar exceeded its growth in electricity demand and predicts it will meet its 2020 solar power target two years early, in 2018. Both energy intensity and coal use have been falling five percent every year and the country will overachieve its Paris Climate Agreement goals long before 2030, according to Climate Action.

Environmental regulations have grown teeth: Friends of Nature, an NGO, won a landmark suit in 2015 against three polluters of agricultural land: all men were jailed and paid a multimillion dollar restoration penalty. In 2016, three officials in Xi’an were jailed for tampering with air quality monitoring equipment and seven more were sentenced for falsifying environmental reports. Officials’ promotions now depend on their environmental records, while violators–and those who fail to report them–incur daily penalties that accumulate for as long as their violations continue.

At the beginning of the twentieth century the ecosystem of the yellow-soil loess plateau had lost its tree cover and was called ‘China’s Sorrow,’ for its cycles of flooding, drought and famine. Now, according to Michigan State researchers, the plateau’s tree cover increased on a million acres–1.6 percent of China’s land–between 2000 and 2010. By investing more than $100 billion on trees since 2000, the country increased its forest coverage from nineteen percent to twenty-three percent today.

The government initiated ‘The Great Green Wall’ in 1978, to stop the Gobi Desert encroaching, a 3,000 mile windbreak along the northern Gobi to be created with 100 billion trees. Forty patient years later, in 2017, volunteers and farmers had planted seventy-billion trees and dust storms had decreased significantly. The government also allocated $600 million to restore a million acres of farmland, leave 200,000 acres unplanted to replenish aquifers, repair heavy-metal-contaminated fields, rehabilitate ecosystems in the Southwest and correct salinization in the Northwest. The restored acreage will rotate crops to ‘increase fertility, save irrigation water and reduce soil-borne pests’.

The Chinese Government plans to plant 6.6 million hectares of forest – an area the size of Ireland and intends to increase its forest cover to 23 percent by 2020.


2018-01-24 on hooverinstitution

“One expert observer with apparently excellent sources offers a portrait of a hands-on leader making decisions:The so-called “CMC chairman responsibility system” means that in all the issues of discussions, the final decision-making authority lies with Xi Jinping. At present, Xi goes to the CMC administrative building at least twice a week and he was there even more often during the military reforms. Some of the plans were even proposed by Xi himself, while the CMC members were only passing ‘such proposals.’”

Balderdash. Some anonymous dude imagines how Chinese governance would function if it were American. The article is pretty thin gruel in itself: hostile, dismissive, ironic and ignorant.


2018-01-20 on nanalyzecomments

2020 sounds doable when you consider that, according to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb

China also leads in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and quantum secure direct communication.


2018-01-17 on wired

“10,000 students murdered by the army”?? Someone’s been pulling your leg!

The Columbia Journalism Review critiques coverage of Tiananmen:
http://www.cjr.org/behind_t…

US State Department’s cables at the time: http://www.alternativeinsig…

The Massacre that Wasn’t: http://www.globalresearch.c…

Britain’s Daily Telegraph: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/…

Australian prof. Greg Clark http://www.gregoryclark.net…

The Truth about Tiananmen Square? I’ve heard from several Chinese American friends (now US citizens), who lived in China in 1989, that the student leaders behind the Tiananmen Square protest/massacre (April 14 to June 4, 1989) were supported by the CIA.

Oh, come on, I thought, another conspiracy theory!

However, my curiosity was stirred, so I spent hours hunting the internet for clues that this might be true. I discovered several coincidences that raised an eyebrow.

The U.S. Ambassador in China at the time, James Lilley (April 20, 1989 to 1991), was a former CIA operative who worked in Asia and helped insert CIA agents into China. President H. W. Bush served as Chief of the U.S. Liaison Office in Beijing (1974 – 1976) , then went to serve as Director of the CIA (1976 – 1977).

Why did President H. W. Bush replace Winston Lord as ambassador to China (1985-1989) during the early days of the Tiananmen Square incident with a former CIA agent? After all, Lord spoke some Chinese and was a key figure in the restoration of relations between the US and China in 1972. Wasn’t he the best man for the job during a crisis like this?

I returned to my friends and asked, “How do you know the CIA helped the student leaders of the protest?”

“It’s obvious,” was the answer. The reason, my friends explained, was the fact that it is very difficult, almost impossible, for anyone in China to get a visa to visit the United States. Yet most of the leaders of the Tiananmen incident left China quickly and prospered in the West without any obvious difficulty. After these student leaders came to the West, many were successful and became wealthy.

I returned to my investigation to verify these claims. Let’s Welcome Chinese Tourists was one piece I read from the Washington Postdocumenting how difficult it was to get a visa to visit the US from China. I read another piece in the Chicago Tribune on the same subject. My wife told me her brother and two sisters were denied visas to the US.

After more virtual sleuthing, I learned that Wang Dan, one of the principal organizers of the Tiananmen incident, went to jail because he stayed in China when most of the student leaders fled. Today, Wang lives in the West and cannot go back. Two others went to Harvard and a third went to Yale. Where did they get the money? It’s expensive to attend these private universities.

How about the other leaders who fled to the West? “Some have reincarnated themselves as Internet entrepreneurs, stockbrokers, or in one case, as a chaplain for the U.S. military in Iraq. Several have been back to China to investigate potential business opportunities.” Source: Time Magazine


2018-01-11 on cdrsalamander

Rubbish. Nobody was harmed in Tiananmen Square. This has been known for decades. Here are the sources: The Columbia Journalism Review critiques coverage of Tiananmen:

http://www.cjr.org/behind_t…

US State Department’s cables at the time:

http://www.alternativeinsig…

The Massacre that Wasn’t: http://www.globalresearch.c…

Britain’s Daily Telegraph:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/…

Australian prof. Greg Clark: http://www.gregoryclark.net…

Truth about Tiananmen Square?
I’ve heard from several Chinese American friends (now US citizens), who lived in China in 1989, that the student leaders behind the Tiananmen Square protest/massacre (April 14 to June 4, 1989) were supported by the CIA.

Oh, come on, I thought, another conspiracy theory!

However, my curiosity was stirred, so I spent hours hunting the internet for clues that this might be true. I discovered several coincidences that raised an eyebrow.

The U.S. Ambassador in China at the time, James Lilley (April 20, 1989 to 1991), was a former CIA operative who worked in Asia and helped insert CIA agents into China. President H. W. Bush served as Chief of the U.S. Liaison Office in Beijing (1974 – 1976) , then went to serve as Director of the CIA (1976 – 1977).

Why did President H. W. Bush replace Winston Lord as ambassador to China (1985-1989) during the early days of the Tiananmen Square incident with a former CIA agent? After all, Lord spoke some Chinese and was a key figure in the restoration of relations between the US and China in 1972. Wasn’t he the best man for the job during a crisis like this?

I returned to my friends and asked, “How do you know the CIA helped the student leaders of the protest?”

“It’s obvious,” was the answer. The reason, my friends explained, was the fact that it is very difficult, almost impossible, for anyone in China to get a visa to visit the United States. Yet most of the leaders of the Tiananmen incident left China quickly and prospered in the West without any obvious difficulty. After these student leaders came to the West, many were successful and became wealthy.

I returned to my investigation to verify these claims. Let’s Welcome Chinese Tourists was one piece I read from the Washington Postdocumenting how difficult it was to get a visa to visit the US from China. I read another piece in the Chicago Tribune on the same subject. My wife told me her brother and two sisters were denied visas to the US.

After more virtual sleuthing, I learned that Wang Dan, one of the principal organizers of the Tiananmen incident, went to jail because he stayed in China when most of the student leaders fled. Today, Wang lives in the West and cannot go back. Two others went to Harvard and a third went to Yale. Where did they get the money? It’s expensive to attend these private universities.

How about the other leaders who fled to the West? “Some have reincarnated themselves as Internet entrepreneurs, stockbrokers, or in one case, as a chaplain for the U.S. military in Iraq. Several have been back to China to investigate potential business opportunities.” Source: Time Magazine


2018-01-08 on hpronline

President Carter said, “THE United States is abandoning its role as the global champion of human rights.

Revelations that top officials are targeting people to be assassinated abroad, including American citizens, are only the most recent, disturbing proof of how far our nation’s violation of human rights has extended. This development began after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and has been sanctioned and escalated by bipartisan executive and legislative actions, without dissent from the general public. As a result, our country can no longer speak with moral authority on these critical issues.

While the country has made mistakes in the past, the widespread abuse of human rights over the last decade has been a dramatic change from the past. With leadership from the United States, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted in 1948 as “the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.” This was a bold and clear commitment that power would no longer serve as a cover to oppress or injure people, and it established equal rights of all people to life, liberty, security of person, equal protection of the law and freedom from torture, arbitrary detention or forced exile.

The declaration has been invoked by human rights activists and the international community to replace most of the world’s dictatorships with democracies and to promote the rule of law in domestic and global affairs. It is disturbing that, instead of strengthening these principles, our government’s counterterrorism policies are now clearly violating at least 10 of the declaration’s 30 articles, including the prohibition against “cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”

Recent legislation has made legal the president’s right to detain a person indefinitely on suspicion of affiliation with terrorist organizations or “associated forces,” a broad, vague power that can be abused without meaningful oversight from the courts or Congress (the law is currently being blocked by a federal judge). This law violates the right to freedom of expression and to be presumed innocent until proved guilty, two other rights enshrined in the declaration.”

The UN Declaration of Universal Human Rights lists 30 rights that both China and the US have committed to uphold.

China leads the US 24-2 (with 4 drawn) in the rights count.

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDH…


2018-01-08 on whowhatwhy

“the regime of Vladimir Putin also successfully interfered in both the 2016 US presidential election and the Brexit vote in the UK”. Rubbish. There’s zero proof and almost nothing that counts as evidence–let alone motive or benefit–to support such a silly idea.

“Alexei Navalny, the leading opposition candidate, banned from participating in the March vote”? Alex has never, in his entire, US-funded career, drawn more than 2% of the vote. Not once. He’s a joke.


2018-01-08 on labequip

China’s Social Credit is a popular initiative as much as a government initiative: the Chinese are the most trusting people on earth and they’re tired of being scammed online for billions each year. They’re especially trusting of their government and 86% of them say it works for everybody and not just for a fortunate few.
https://uploads.disquscdn.c…
Second, it’s not just for citizens. Government departments, officials, cops, corporations, Supreme Court justices, Congresspeople–everyone gets social credit if they want it (participation is entirely voluntary). Doesn’t this sound better than our system, where private corporations rate us and sell the information to other private corporations and government agencies without our permission and with limited access–but offer no reciprocity? Ask TRW for a rating on a vendor and see how far you get.

Third, it’s 90% carrot and 10% stick: the higher your score the easier your life becomes. Japan and the Netherlands, for example, now offer expedited visa processing for Chinese travelers with scores above 750. Landlords waive deposits if you’re over 800…and so on.

Fourth, it’s part of China’s 2,000-year-old plan to create a datong society in which (to be brief) everybody is taken care of and nobody needs to lock their doors at night–a goal that every Chinese supports and which the government hopes to deliver by 2049. That means they have to hustle.

In short, our media are interpreting yet another Chinese policy in Western terms. China is nothing like us. Nothing. It’s a different world and it does things accordingly.


2018-01-02 on truthdig

Some of what George Washington conveyed to his countrymen about the divisiveness of political parties reveals the president’s genuine wisdom:

“Parties become potent engines by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion”. The disorders and miseries which result gradually incline the minds of men to seek security and repose in the absolute power of an individual; and sooner or later the chief of some prevailing faction, more able or more fortunate than his competitors, turns this disposition to the purposes of his own elevation, on the ruins of public liberty.

Without looking forward to an extremity of this kind (which nevertheless ought not to be entirely out of sight), the common and continual mischiefs of the spirit of party are sufficient to make it the interest and duty of a wise people to discourage and restrain it. It serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot and insurrection. It opens the door to foreign influence and corruption, which finds a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passions. Thus the policy and the will of one country are subjected to the policy and will of another”.


2018-01-02 on truthdig

Any people who live together as settled farmers tilling the same land for 3,000 years continuously, reading the same, unchanging script, will look alike. But the resemblance ends there. Just because an ancient society has agreed on a manner of socializing with strangers doesn’t mean it’s homogeneous.

Surveillance is much more omnipresent in the UK than in China, incidentally, and the UK has armed police, twice the serious crime rate and three times the recidivism.


2018-01-02 on radiichina

“[Communist] Party theoreticians and propagandists are hypersensitive to any attempts to separate the party from the people. Doing so undermines the CCP’s very raison d’etre and sets up the possibility that the Chinese nation or people could have a future or identity separate from that of the Party.’

Just guessing, but I suspect you’ll find that Capitalist Party theoreticians and propagandists are hypersensitive to any attempts to separate the party from the people, too.


2018-01-02 on truthdig

‘“Can there be a democracy when you don’t have a competitive electoral system?”
Actually, yes. The Chinese are managing their country democratically without a competitive electoral system, as their satisfaction levels indicate: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

Picking personnel is a crapshoot, the Chinese say, best left to HR experts. Shaping their policies, on the other hand, is something that everyone can participate in. No matter how you slice it–constitutionally, electively, popularly, procedurally, operationally, substantively or financially–China’s version of democracy comes out ahead.

In survey after survey, it’s the most trusted government in the world and its policies enjoy the highest support. Read ‘Selling Democracy to the Chinese’: https://www.unz.com/article….


2018-01-01 on breitbartproduction

It is so difficult for us to imagine a President being “inspiring and practical” that the very idea seems preposterous.
But if our President had, at the end of his first term, gored government corruption, brought the military-industrial complex to heal, eliminated urban poverty and homelessness–as Xi has done–then perhaps we’d be willing to listen to an “inspiring and practical” message from him.
Even feel a twinge of, um, gratitude…


2018-01-01 on hpronline

Social Credit’s most significant aspects:

1. It’s essentially an Amazon Review of everyone by everyone you’ve ever dealt with. It’s exactly like the ‘reviews’ we give friends in our social circle, constantly updated in the same ways.

2. It ranks not only every citizen who chooses to participate, but every government official, cop, judge, department, corporation and shoeshine. It’s truly universal. There’s no privileged, hidden operator that’s spared, no-one pulling the strings.

3. It’s being implemented in and by the most trusting people on earth–the Chinese–with their complete approval and participation. They know they need it to reach their next social goal, which Xi will announce in 2021. It’s a means to an end that everyone wants.

It’s a popular initiative as much as a government initiative: the Chinese are the most trusting people on earth and they’re tired of being scammed online for billions each year. They’re especially trusting of their government and 86% of them say it works for everybody and not just for a fortunate few. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

It’s not just for citizens. Government departments, officials, cops, corporations, Supreme Court justices, Congresspeople–everyone gets social credit if they want it (participation is entirely voluntary). Doesn’t this sound better than our system, where private corporations rate us and sell the information to other private corporations and government agencies without our permission and with limited access–but offer no reciprocity? Ask TRW for a rating on a vendor and see how far you get.

It’s 90% carrot and 10% stick: the higher your score the easier your life becomes. Japan and the Netherlands, for example, now offer expedited visa processing for Chinese travelers with scores above 750. Landlords waive deposits if you’re over 800…and so on. A Shanghai broker with two outstanding, unsettled judgements against him was denied first and business class seats when flying to London recently: that’s a pretty light stick.

It’s part of China’s 2,000-year-old plan to create a datong society in which (to be brief) everybody is taken care of and nobody needs to lock their doors at night–a goal that every Chinese supports and which the government hopes to deliver by 2049. That means they have to hustle.

Our media are interpreting yet another Chinese policy in Western terms. China is nothing like us. Nothing. It’s a different world and it does things accordingly.


2018-01-01 on bloombergview

Excellent insights. Two niggles:

1. ‘Yet more of the advances on the tech side are troubling, such as how artificial intelligence is being used for facial surveillance in China’? That’s only because China is the world leader in face (not ‘facial,’ a cosmetic procedure) recognition. My prediction? The UK will adopt it in 2018 and the USA will follow in 2019.

2. ‘How Chinese social credit rating systems are assessing the suitability of individuals as both credit risks and loyal citizens’. It’s not just for rating citizens. It’s essentially an Amazon Review of everyone by everyone they’ve ever dealt with. It’s exactly like the ‘reviews’ we give friends in our circle, constantly updated in the same ways.
It ranks not only every citizen who chooses to participate, but every government official, cop, judge, department, corporation and shoeshine. It’s truly universal. There’s no privileged, hidden operator that’s spared, no-one pulling the strings.
It’s 90% carrot and 10% stick: the higher your score the easier your life becomes. Japan and the Netherlands, for example, now offer expedited visa processing for Chinese travelers with scores above 750. Landlords waive deposits if you’re over 800…and so on.
It’s being implemented in and by the most trusting people on earth–the Chinese–with their complete approval and participation. They know they need it to reach their next social goal, which Xi will announce in 2021. It’s a means to an end that everyone wants.

3. ‘I expect many other autocracies to adopt similar technologies’. China is less an autocracy than the USA–by a very wide margin. No matter how you slice it–constitutionally, electively, popularly, procedurally, operationally, substantively or financially–China comes out ahead.
In survey after survey, it’s the most trusted government in the world and its policies enjoy the highest support. Read ‘Selling Democracy to the Chinese’: https://www.unz.com/article….


2018-01-01 on evonomics

Would love to hear a Chinese sociologist’s musings on this subject…


2017-12-28 on bruegel

“a massive credit binge”??
Given her rate of growth, China is far underleveraged compared to the USA, the EU and Japan: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-12-28 on bloombergview

Of all the national debts in the world, China’s is the most sustainable. China’s debt to GDP is far below Japan’s. It is below the USA’s, too, yet its economy is growing 4 times faster. It corporate assets offset most of its corporate debt (Beijing is the home to the largest number of Global 500 headquarters on earth, incidentally) and it has annual trading profit of $300 billion, ample savings and a GDP that’s 15-30% bigger than the official figure. http://csis.org/files/publi…

While local governments borrowed a lot over the past eight years, an audit focusing on their indebtedness concluded that this was not a pervasive problem. And as for the localities which do have issues, either the provincial governments or the central government will have to bail them out.

The key question is whether the central government has the resources to handle the debt problems of some of these corporations and local governments. And the answer is yes. Beijing has almost four trillion USD of reserves and its overall government debt level as a share of GDP is low.

China actually saves more than it invests; it is one of the few countries where the savings rate is higher than the investment rate. Moreover, the country is still generating substantial balance of payments surpluses. China therefore doesn’t fit into a stereotype of a country in a financial crisis.

More: http://carnegieendowment.or…


2017-12-24 on wired

““How do we know Xiaomi can avoid running afoul of the unseen and un-transparent rules of the present leadership — or of the leadership that will follow the current administration?”
We know because 95% of Chinese trust the present leadership —and they’ll probably trust the leadership that will follow the current administration.
That’s how we know.


2017-12-21 on thtoh

“The generation that experienced the Cultural Revolution while in their teens and early twenties were denied an education in favor of ideology and revolutionary fervor rather than being empowered with knowledge and personal initiative”.

Erm, the generation that experienced the Cultural Revolution while in their teens included both the current Prime Minister and the current President of China, both of whom experienced at first hand throughout their formative years the cruelty and indifference of party hacks towards those at the bottom of the pile.

That’s why both of them are so intent on wiping out poverty by 2020: they know the evils that follow from it. That’s the ideology and revolutionary fervor they learned–and which cannot be learned otherwise. Without that, China would not be looking forward to the brightest century ever.

Mao empowered them with knowledge and the personal initiative to take responsibility for what they had witnessed and they’re doing him proud.


2017-12-21 on wired

China’s real human rights record bears little resemblance to Western media’s narrative, “China’s human rights record”. Anyone who reads the 30 Articles of the UN Declaration of Universal Human Rights will recognize, immediately, that China’s human rights record is far, far better than the USA’s or the EU’s.
http://www.un.org/en/univer…. And that’s just for ‘rights’ that were dreamed up by the West based on Western values.

As Randall Nadeau observes, “Western liberal democracy is not the only model for universal human rights: I will argue that Confucianism can and should be a universal ethic of human liberation. The goal of personal freedom is not uniquely Western, and it is not anti-Confucian. Self- determination is as much a Confucian value as it is a Western value, and the West has a great deal to learn from the East about self-cultivation in the context of family and community life. Embedded in the Confucian classics, as well as historically in specific Confucian institutions, is a profound idea of individual possibility, creativity, and achievement, in some ways more dynamic and integrative than Western values, which see individuals and communities in conflict and opposition”.

“Looking at the Western values underlying human rights we can see why ‘first generation’ rights are given so much emphasis. These include the radical autonomy of the individual, the soul in a transcendent relationship to the world, the prioritizing of the individual over the family and the prioritizing of the individual over the state. The West defines human rights as ‘freedom from’ oppressive tendencies of the family and state and grounds human rights in the fundamental equality of all persons. Thus, human rights are equated with human liberation–liberation of the autonomous individual from the restrictive community. Are these values necessary for human rights? If so, it’s difficult to imagine that Asian nations will subscribe to those ‘first generation’ rights given so much importance in the West”. http://web.uri.edu/iaics/fi…

A second Confucian challenge to the Western conception of human rights is in the fundamentally communitarian basis of li. As we have seen, the traditional Western view of human rights conceptually separates the individual from the community, which is potentially oppressive. So, human rights are frequently expressed in Western terms as a kind of freedom, independence, or liberation. Feminism, for example, is equated with “women’s liberation” from the oppressive nature of fixed gender roles.

In conclusion, I have attempted in this paper to make these four statements:

1. The Confucian tradition supports human rights for individuals-in-community, including both “first generation” and “second generation” rights.

2. Ren and li are positive models for self-cultivation, emphasizing human creativity and development.

3. Ren and li are definitive of humanity, and it is a violation of a person’s human rights to deny his or her full participation in family, community, and state as a self-actualizing moral agent.

4. Confucian relationships are non-egalitarian but affirm the fundamental worth, dignity, and freedom of all persons.


2017-12-20 on wired

Their government–which is, not incidentally, the most trusted government on earth. 83% of Chinese think their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

According to the Edelman 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/… .

Interpersonal trust is almost as high as Sweden’s, when people are asked if they agree with the statement “most people can be trusted” (World Value Survey). https://ourworldindata.org/…


2017-12-20 on wired

The rankers get ranked by everyone below them. It’s a 360-degree ranking system in 3D.

It’s more carrot than stick, too. Wait and see.


2017-12-19 on lowyinterpreter

“It should be entirely uncontroversial that people in Australia not have their freedoms constrained by a foreign power.”
Does ‘foreign power’ include the murderous, terrorist USA, perchance?
I’m guessing not.


2017-12-15 on wired

The article tragically misrepresents the Social Credit system’ most significant aspects:
1. It’s essentially an Amazon Review of everyone by everyone they’ve ever dealt with. It’s exactly like the ‘reviews’ we give friends in our circle, constantly updated in the same ways.
2. It ranks not only every citizen who chooses to participate, but every government official, cop, judge, department, corporation and shoeshine. It’s truly universal. There’s no privileged, hidden operator that’s spared, no-one pulling the strings.
3. It’s being implemented in and by the most trusting people on earth–the Chinese–with their complete approval and participation. They know they need it to reach their next social goal, which Xi will announce in 2021. It’s a means to an end that everyone wants.


2017-12-09 on wsws

No. Making British-style democracy work took 800 years and even then it’s a crapshoot, as we see.
That accumulated cultural experience is not available elsewhere. Besides, they have other models better suited to their unique history.


2017-12-09 on wsws

“Five people accused by Thailand’s military junta of hoarding military weapons were charged on Thursday. The charges are a thinly veiled attempt to suppress political opposition and potentially to create a pretext for delaying or calling off elections promised for next year.”

In Australia, where I was born, elections work well. They’re part of Oz’s Anglo-Saxon heritage. In Thailand, where I live, they’re a disaster in many, many respects.

The current military government has 80% public support and is doing a much better job than the last elected governments who were–regardless of party affiliation–scoundrels who robbed the country blind.


2017-12-08 on fortruss

Yet nobody dies in Tiananmen Square, as these sources make Clea:

The Columbia Journalism Review critiques coverage of Tiananmen:
http://www.cjr.org/behind_t…

US State Department’s cables at the time:
http://www.alternativeinsig…

The Massacre that Wasn’t: http://www.globalresearch.c…

Britain’s Daily Telegraph:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/…

Australian diplomat. Greg Clark
http://www.gregoryclark.net…


2017-12-06 on chinalawblog

Fascinating. An excellent chaser for this and similar concerns is Einar Tangen’s ‘Pandora’s box in the internet era’ at http://intelligentsystemsmo….

Though-provoking.


2017-12-06 on thewirein

“inside Tibet, rising frustration and hopelessness have been highlighted by people resorting to self-immolation. The number stands at 149 so far.”

Far from ‘rising frustration and hopelessness,’ the Tibetan people–or at least the 90% of Tibetans descended from ex-slaves–are thriving. They’re literate for the first time, they live twice as long and are twice as numerous as under the Dalai Lama and surveys indicate they have no interest in independence or being ruled by His Holiness.

The people who self-immolated mostly did so under the guidance and with the encouragement of His Holiness and the expatriate nobility. Useful fools, in other words, troubled people of the kind who, in the West, would be encouraged by security agencies to become ‘terrorists’.


2017-12-01 on technode

“Jack, of course, may have missed the news about Beijing’s migrant expulsion at the time.”
No, Jack didn’t miss it. He knew that story was bs from day one. Those workers had a year’s notice, there were big CONDEMNED notices on the buildings but the workers hung on to the bitter end because BEIJING WAGES HAVE GONE THROUGH THE ROOF and they were making the most of it.
They all own their own homes, anyway. All of them.
It’s not like they’re being thrown onto the street, for God’s sake.
They just like making 10x more money in Beijing than they can make back home.
Honest… https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-11-29 on alternativeinsight

It would be interesting to run this by Yukon Huang, who has decades of experience with Keynesian investment results. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-11-29 on shanghaiist

The reports of my death were always exaggerated. Hope never dies, I guess.


2017-11-29 on shanghaiist

“strategically removes any mention of the firm being owned and operated by a Chinese company”. I checked, and found that Facebook also strategically removes any mention of the firm being owned and operated by an American company.
Weird..


2017-11-28 on bloombergview

What do you mean by ‘freedom of the press’, anywhere?
What benefits do you expect from what you call ‘freedom of the press’?

I think the term ‘freedom of the press’ is not only meaningless, it’s destructive. It pretends that presses owned by billionaires are ‘free’ while presses cooperatively owned by governments are not.

Yet, throughout the world, people overwhelmingly trust government owned and government controlled 4:1 over ‘free’ presses. And that includes China.


2017-11-25 on nationalinterest

“can you name any authoritarian state with overall superior technology to the US?“
Yes. China has overall superior technology to the US. Now.
According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb

China leads in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and quantum secure direct communication: https://www.technologyrevie….


2017-11-23 on lowyinterpreter

“Is America even capable of taking on Beijing if it wanted to?”
No.
America is not even close to being capable of taking on Beijing if it wanted to. That horse left the barn several years ago when China’s official economy passed ours accelerating three times faster than ours.
God knows when its unofficial GDP passed ours but, twelve months from now it will be $30 trillion to our $19 trillion.
And still growing three times faster.
And leading in five of the eight basic sciences.
And leading in 28 of the 30 major technologies.
And leading in household net worth.
And maternal mortality.
And food insecurity.
And poverty.
And trust. Trust, for God’s sake.
https://uploads.disquscdn.c…
And…within 1000 km of her borders–where it counts–military superiority.
No, we need to find another way to relate to China. Strategic competition won’t cut it.
https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-11-22 on mintpressnews

Many thanks for connecting those dots. It’s thanks to work like this that our mainstream media are dying. Unlamented, too.


2017-11-22 on theduran

I live in northern Thailand, two hours from Myanmar, and my staff are from there. They say your analysis is accurate. Good work!


2017-11-19 on devexnews

“We will also watch to see if Chinese leadership extends beyond its borders, including reconsidering support of high-carbon energy infrastructure in other countries.”
China’s new national emissions trading scheme’s regulations on supply chain emissions mean that all China’s trading partners will have to clean up their emissions because the regulations tax ‘emissions generated outside the direct control of a Chinese business, possibly by extraction and production of products (coal, oil) purchased by the business, third-party transport (polluting cargo ships and airplanes) and products’ after-sale use’.

By incorporating the source of power generation into the scheme, China will speed the shift to a low carbon energy mix, raise the demand worldwide for its sustainable power generating technology.

It will, for example, reduce Australia’s one hundred million tons of coal exports to China–and for all its trading partners. Here’s what Peter Castellas, chief executive of Australia’s Carbon Market Institute said, “Our energy-intensive exports sit directly in the supply chain of the world’s largest carbon market, where their customers are going to have a liability around the carbon price. That will send a market signal of real significance”.


2017-11-17 on southfront

Many thanks for a little fresh air!


2017-11-17 on lowyinterpreter

Thank you for your insights. I finally understand why 85% of Chinese trust their government https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

and 95% think its doing a good job. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-11-16 on lowyinterpreter

“we have (if our media and political commentary is anything to go by) a strong commitment to resist any erosion to our values and norms”. Our values and norms being, one assumes, attacking defenseless foreign countries, imprisoning refugees we thus created, and murdering our indigenous people. Fair enough. I’ll go along with that.

But “Surely we don’t need to pre-emptively self-censor?” No. That’s a bridge too far. As Edward Herman & Noam Chomsky demonstrated in” Manufacturing Consent” in1988, “The mass media serve as a system for communicating messages and symbols to the general populace. It is their function to amuse, entertain, and inform, and to inculcate individuals with the values, beliefs, and codes of behavior that will integrate them into the institutional structures of the larger society. In a world of concentrated wealth and major conflicts of class interest, to fulfill this role requires systematic propaganda.

“In countries where the levers of power are in the hands of a state bureaucracy, the monopolistic control over the media, often supplemented by official censorship, makes it clear that the media serve the ends of a dominant elite. It is much more difficult to see a propaganda system at work where the media are private and formal censorship is absent. This is especially true where the media actively compete, periodically attack and expose corporate and governmental malfeasance, and aggressively portray themselves as spokesmen for free speech and the general community interest. What is not evident (and remains undiscussed in the media) is the limited nature of such critiques, as well as the huge inequality in command of resources, and its effect both on access to a private media system and on its behavior and performance.

“A propaganda model focuses on this inequality of wealth and power and its multilevel effects on mass-media interests and choices. It traces the routes by which money and power are able to filter out the news fit to print, marginalize dissent, and allow the government and dominant private interests to get their messages across to the public. The essential ingredients of our propaganda model, or set of news “filters,” fall under the following headings: (I) the size, concentrated ownership, owner wealth, and profit orientation of the dominant mass-media firms; (~) advertising as the primary income source of the mass media; (3) the reliance of the media on information provided by government, business, and “experts” funded and approved by these primary sources and agents of power; (4) “flak” as a means of disciplining the media; and (5) “anticommunism” as a national religion and control mechanism. These elements interact with and reinforce one another. The raw material of news must pass through successive filters, leaving only the cleansed residue fit to print. They fix the premises of discourse and interpretation, and the definition of what is newsworthy in the first place, and they explain the basis and operations of what amount to propaganda campaigns.

“The elite domination of the media and marginalization of dissidents that results from the operation of these filters occurs so naturally that media news people, frequently operating with complete integrity and goodwill, are able to convince themselves that they choose and interpret the news “objectively” and on the basis of professional news values. Within the limits of the filter constraints they often are objective; the constraints are so powerful, and are built into the system in such a fundamental way, that alternative bases of news choices are hardly imaginable. In assessing the newsworthiness of the U.S. government’s urgent claims of a shipment of MIGs to Nicaragua on November 5, I984, the media do not stop to ponder the bias that is inherent in the priority assigned to government-supplied raw material, or the possibility that the government might be manipulating the news, imposing its own agenda, and deliberately diverting attention from other material. It requires a macro, alongside a micro- (story-by-story), view of media operations, to see the pattern of manipulation and systematic bias”.


2017-11-16 on theatlantic

Gosh! Another Russian hit piece–and from a reliable, right-wing, warmongering source, too. What a coincidence!


2017-11-14 on theatlantic

Governments are, in general, the source of innovation and the reason the US is falling behind is that neoliberal policies have diminished government’s role. For fun, read about this in the works of Mariana Mazzucato, the world’s scariest economist.
All companies run less on innovation: all the IP underlying Intel, Google and Facebook, for example, comes from the government.


2017-11-13 on theatlantic

No, that can’t be a factor, since China now leads the world in innovation. According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb

China leads in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and quantum secure direct communication: https://www.technologyrevie….


2017-11-08 on bloombergview

Look out your window and you’ll see some of the 500 million wealthy Chinese who’ve traveled abroad in the past 10 years and seen the best of what we have to offer and gone home to tell their friends how lucky they are to live in the world’s biggest, fairest, most law-abiding, fastest-growing economy.


2017-11-08 on bloombergview

“China has almost wiped out urban poverty”. The Guardian. Elizabeth StuartWednesday 19 August 2015 12.34 https://www.theguardian.com…

Can China end rural poverty by 2020? – USA Today. https://www.google.co.th/ur…

“We can reasonably expect the virtual elimination of extreme poverty in China by 2022”. journalistsresource.org/stu….


2017-11-07 on breitbartproduction

Why would a country that’s ahead of us–both scientifically and technologically–steal IP from us? So they could unlearn things?

According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb

China also leads in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and quantum secure direct communication: https://www.technologyrevie….


2017-11-07 on bloombergview

How does the personal testimony of two neurologists from China impact the National Institutes of Health report? How would two neurologists know anything that nobody else knows? What evidence did they advance?

Falun Gong are nuts. Falun Gong is a business started by a secular scam artist looking to do a pyramid scheme where adherents are forced to continually buy new “holy texts”.

The Chinese government crackdown started in 1994 because of the number of people who were going bankrupt from buying all those “holy texts”.

Then a Falun Gong genius staged an illegal protest in Tiananmen Square and the government decided to just shut the whole cult/scam down. Falun Gong is a business masquerading as a cult (like Scientology) derived from traditional Chinese spiritual and health beliefs (like western yoga) with restrictions on using modern medicine (like Jehovah’s Witnesses). It strictly educates and controls what its followers say and do, and is aim directly at taking down the Communist Party of China, so it happily profits from political arbitrage between China and the West.

Falun Gong profits from Western fascination and ignorance of Chinese culture: their Shen Yun is billed as a spectacular Cirque du Soleil-style presentation of Chinese culture that the Communists destroyed. In reality, it’s a Disneyfied caricature of Chinese culture to indoctrinate audiences about Falun Gong. Falun Gong runs a propaganda campaign that’s far more sophisticated than the Communist Party of China. (Maybe they have help from a foreign agency with long experience in that field?)

Politics and religion (as long as it is Protestant Christianity) regularly mixes in America, so Americans have a hard time understanding why the Chinese government has a problem with a Chinese religion.

A quick skim through Chinese history will show cult or religious movements were responsible for an overwhelming number of social upheavals and many deaths. So any government of China, communist or not, would rightfully be wary of groups like Falun Gong.

What exactly makes Falun Gong so controversial in China? Do they harbour subversive intentions? Apparently Falun Gong refused to allow anyone to criticize Falun Gong in China for any reason. After about 300 organized protests against the media or people who spoke out against them, they finally very publicly and very directly challenged the authority of the Chinese government. There is a long history of religious uprising and rebellions in China, for example Taiping Rebellion – Wikipedia, and the CCP perceived Falun Gong as a real threat. Unsurprisingly, the government reacted quite strongly.[1]

Falun Gong in China was a great deal more “colorful” than it is in the US. It includes demons and aliens and the message that only the founder of Falun Gong can save the world from apocalypse. Apparently lots of these colorful aspects have been edited out of the export version of Falun Gong, and the founder no longer talks directly to press after the strange things he said to Time Magazine.[2]

Since it was banned in China, the group outside China is openly pursuing the downfall of the Communist government. This does not endear them to the CCP. They also work hard to portray themselves as blameless for what happened in China.

Contrary to many claims, the best numbers I can find are that at its peak Falun Gong had something like 10 million members [3], not the 100 million that you will see claimed over and over again in the media.

I think its quite likely the government of China is persecuting Falun Gong. But it is hard to believe the leader of Falun Gong did not know how the government would react to their provocations.

[1] https://www.massey.ac.nz/ma…

[2] Qigong Fever by David Palmer, pg 256–260 David Palmer – HKU Department of Sociology

[3] TIME: Why does chaos reign now?

Li: … The second reason is that since the beginning of this century, aliens have begun to invade the human mind and its ideology and culture.

TIME: Where do they come from?

Li: The aliens come from other planets. The names that I use for these planets are different . Some are from dimensions that human beings have not yet discovered. The key is how they have corrupted mankind. Everyone knows that from the beginning until now, there has never been a development of culture like today. Although it has been several thousand years, it has never been like now.

The aliens have introduced modern machinery like computers and airplanes. They started by teaching mankind about modern science, so people believe more and more science, and spiritually, they are controlled. Everyone thinks that scientists invent on their own when in fact their inspiration is manipulated by the aliens. In terms of culture and spirit, they already control man. Mankind cannot live without science. Li Hongzi interview in Time Magazine, Aug 9, 1999: Breaking News, Analysis, Politics, Blogs, News Photos, Video, Tech Reviews – TIME.com

The US Government subsidizes Falun Gong to slander China. It appears over 6 million dollars have been funneled to Falun Gong via this group in 5 years:
http://www.guidestar.org/Fi…

http://www.guidestar.org/Fi…

http://www.guidestar.org/Fi…

http://www.guidestar.org/Fi…

So what is all this millions for? Public opinion? Ideological war? Foreign policy implement? Your guess is as good as mine.


2017-11-07 on bloombergview

There were no democides. According the the U.S. US National Institutes of Health, the rise life in expectancy under Mao “ranks among the most rapid, sustained increases in documented global history. These survival gains appear to have been largest during the 1950s, with a sharp reversal during the 1959-61 Great Leap Famine that was then followed by substantial progress again during the early 1960s”. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.go…


2017-11-07 on bloombergview

You don’t know what you’re talking about. The Chinese people, who are smarter and more sophisticated about government than anyone on earth (they have higher IQs than us and 3,000 years of obsession with governance) disagree with you completely.

According to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese think their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans think the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

And according to Edelman’s 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/… .


2017-11-07 on bloombergview

You cannot produce evidence because there is none. You are just making stuff up.


2017-11-07 on ceprnet

Ten years ago, growing at 12%, China grew by $761 billion (South Africa’s entire GDP).

This year, growing at 6.7%, China’s economy will grow by $1.3 trillion–(Australia’s GDP).

China’s economic growth is not accelerating as rapidly as before but her growth has not slowed down.

China’s growth has speeded up. Hugely.


2017-11-07 on ceprnet

China has done it. Dean is discussing a mopping up operation that will be completed in 2020.
They’ve precisely identified people in poverty by going door to door. If you visit one of the remaining 40 million poor homes, on its front door you will see a laminated sheet that lists the cause of poverty (isolation,chronic illness, etc), the names of those involved, the programs they are involved in, the date by which the people will be liberated and the name of the official responsible for their emancipation, his photograph and personal cel phone number.


2017-11-07 on ceprnet

However the dough is handed out (and they use myriad ways) they’ve lifted 800,000,000 people out of poverty in 70 years and the last ones will be gone by 2020.

What’s unrealistic?


2017-11-07 on ceprnet

They’ve never done that in the past, so why would they start? Chinese wages continue to outgrow GDP as they have done for decades.


2017-11-07 on ceprnet

China’s poor are unlike ours: they all own the own homes and live without food insecurity. That’s a different kind of poverty.


2017-11-07 on bloombergview

I asked an honest question: “Where is your evidence?”

You responded with baseless allegations. Baseless allegations are not evidence. They are baseless allegations.

Where is your evidence?


2017-11-07 on bloombergview

Really?

Where’s your evidence?


2017-11-07 on bloombergview

Yes, it’s Confucian meritocracy. It has been the country’s saving grace for thousands of years.


2017-11-07 on bloombergview

“Beijing’s authoritative government shut China off from the rest of the world ”
No a US embargo on foodstuffs, technology and finance shut China off from the world and was maintained when she endured a famine in 1961.


2017-11-07 on foreignpolicyjournal

Yes, Bolton’s hypothesis is reasonable: globalization–regardless of who apparently ‘leads’ it, imposes its own dynamics, and I’m jumping the gun by criticizing him because we may find out that he’s right.

And the Chinese have been admirably eclectic in their choice of tactics during their climb out of the basement (Jimmy Carter’s Carter Center oversees all elections there and does training in voter registration, fraud prevention, vote counting, etc., year-round, for example).

But Bolton overreaches by conflating a privately owned, highly destructive vampire squid with a communist country’s foreign policy. Despite our media’s efforts to portray Chinese foreign aid and trade practices in a negative light, they have been remarkably even-handed and always willing to renegotiate treaties when circumstances change for developing countries. When prices for Congo’s commodities dropped dramatically last year–which would have entitled China to ship twice the volumes for the same price–China simply refused to exploit its opportunity. And that’s always been its MO.

And when we get to the really big picture, world leadership, that the analogy becomes useless or, as I said, silly. The Chinese government plans to lead the world morally, just as it has lead China and, in so doing, revolutionize what we think of as ‘globalization’. It’s a leadership/governing style that’s 2,000 years old, “The virtue of the leader is like the wind and that of the people is like the grass: when the wind blows over it, the grass must bend in its direction”.

It’s highly cost-effective: all you need is virtuous leaders and, compared to other societies, China has always had them in spades–as we see from its results over the past 70 years:
https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-11-07 on foreignpolicyjournal

Statements like ‘China has taken its cue from Goldman Sachs’ are, for anyone who knows Chinese history, silly. And as to Bolton’s ‘business as usual, same old same old’ thesis: read Xi’s report to the 19th Party Congress, in which, among other things, he lays out China’s vision of a globalized world. It looks nothing like the present one.

Early in 2018, you’ll be able to find a full explanation in this book: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-11-06 on bloombergview

Your vote doesn’t count in the USA. In fact, it doesn’t count TWICE. The Electoral College was designed to prevent direct Presidential voting (The founding fathers established it in the Constitution as a compromise between election of the President by a vote in Congress and election of the President by a popular vote of qualified citizens. The Electoral College process consists of the selection of the electors, the meeting of the electors where they vote for President and Vice President, and the counting of the electoral votes by Congress).

And your vote doesn’t count in another way: no matter who you vote for, America’s policies don’t change: “Testing Theories of American Politics: Elites, Interest Groups, and Average Citizens”. Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page
https://doi.org/10.1017/S15….

That’s why 90% of Americans don’t trust Congress.

90% of Chinese trust their Congress and electoral process because things there DO change, for the better. One of the most visible changes is the elimination of poverty. Already in cities and, by 2020 in rural areas, too, poverty has been eliminated and every poor person owns their own home and land.

Get used to it.


2017-11-05 on bloombergview

According to the Edelman 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/… .

According to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese thought their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…


2017-11-04 on bloombergview

Trump was chosen by members of the Electoral College. Who elected them? On what basis do they choose presidents?


2017-11-03 on lowyinterpreter

“In recent days, two more incidences have surfaced in the wake of the uproar over Cambridge University Press, which first agreed and then demurred to remove 300 papers from its archive inside China.”

We know how much damage false information (propaganda) does when it gets out of control. Remember what happened when false information–an unfounded rumor of non-existent weapons of mass destruction in Iraq–got out of control? People believed those rumors and killed millions of women and children and bombed Iraq into ruins.

China does not want that to happen so she regulates rumor-mongering at home and slows misinformation–like Iraq’s WMDs–from entering the country from abroad. That’s why no Chinese ever believed the rumor about Iraq having weapons of mass destruction: they had time to consider the evidence from both sides.

When China’s censor tried to block 315 articles about China published by Cambridge University Press, Western media and Western academics were outraged and called the censor’s action ‘repression’.

If you read the 315 articles, you’ll see why the censor objected to them: they conveyed false information about China: rumors, like Iraq’s WMDs, that unregulated Western media have been circulating by for decades.

Eighty of the 315 articles, for example, were based on the brutal, blood-soaked massacre of thousands of democracy-loving students in Tiananmen Square in 1989. China’s censor had two problems with this:

The first problem is veracity: there was no brutal, blood-soaked massacre of thousands of democracy-loving students in Tiananmen Square in 1989*, or ever. The students demonstrated in Tiananmen because they’d lost their university scholarships thanks to Deng’s Reform and Opening and were angry that black students, who kept their scholarships, were now dating Chinese girls. In the end, the students went home and were all safely in bed by 6:30 am. In other words, the journal articles knowingly spread false, harmful information.

The second problem is authority: Cambridge University Press, one of the world’s best academic publishers, is responsible for wonderful books like Joseph Needham’s Science and Technology in China. Chinese students, who respect authoritative sources, might think the Tiananmen articles are truthful because Cambridge published them. And when they see that the articles were written by famous scholars–world authorities in their fields–the false information becomes even more persuasive.

More recently still, the RussiaGate scandal has caused the American government to acknowledge that voters can be manipulated by social media, as China has observed for years. But, because she is labeled as a ‘non-Western dictatorship,’ Western media claimed that China had invented these threats as a pretext for ‘cracking down on democracy and free speech’. Now we know the truth.


2017-11-02 on shanghaiist

You are able to see through their BS and not replicate it?

Give us an example of your throughsight, please.


2017-11-02 on shanghaiist

Guys, get a grip! Drop the ad hom. Address the issues I raised or shut up. This is not a schoolyard.

And, BTW https://uploads.disquscdn.c… , when the book comes out next year, for God’s sake read it!


2017-11-02 on bloombergview

No, nothing in your comment was wildly inaccurate. It was, however, wildly naive. RSF is a US Government NGO and entirely dedicated to propaganda.

That’s why I compared its findings with data from an objective, commercial firm whose sole product is trust.

Here’s what the comparison demonstrated: across the world, the higher ‘freedom’ rating RSF gives to media, the less people trust it.

Weird, huh?


2017-11-01 on futuredevelopment

” Overall leverage is now getting into dangerous territory for China”? Hardly!

Of all the national debts in the world, China’s is the most sustainable. China’s debt to GDP is far below Japan’s. It is below the USA’s, too, yet its economy is growing 4 times faster. It corporate assets offset most of its corporate debt (Beijing is the home to the largest number of Global 500 headquarters on earth, incidentally) and it has annual trading profit of $300 billion, ample savings and a GDP that’s 15-30% bigger than the official figure. http://csis.org/files/publi…

While local governments borrowed a lot over the past eight years, an audit focusing on their indebtedness concluded that this was not a pervasive problem. And as for the localities which do have issues, either the provincial governments or the central government will have to bail them out.

The key question is whether the central government has the resources to handle the debt problems of some of these corporations and local governments. And the answer is yes. Beijing has almost four trillion USD of reserves and its overall government debt level as a share of GDP is low.

China actually saves more than it invests; it is one of the few countries where the savings rate is higher than the investment rate. Moreover, the country is still generating substantial balance of payments surpluses. China therefore doesn’t fit into a stereotype of a country in a financial crisis.

More: http://carnegieendowment.or…

While local governments borrowed a lot over the past eight years, an audit focusing on their indebtedness concluded that this was not a pervasive problem. And as for the localities which do have issues, either the provincial governments or the central government will have to bail them out.

The key question is whether the central government has the resources to handle the debt problems of some of these corporations and local governments. And the answer is yes. Beijing has almost four trillion USD of reserves and its overall government debt level as a share of GDP is low.

China actually saves more than it invests; it is one of the few countries where the savings rate is higher than the investment rate. Moreover, the country is still generating substantial balance of payments surpluses. China therefore doesn’t fit into a stereotype of a country in a financial crisis.

More: http://carnegieendowment.or…

While local governments borrowed a lot over the past eight years, an audit focusing on their indebtedness concluded that this was not a pervasive problem. And as for the localities which do have issues, either the provincial governments or the central government will have to bail them out.

The key question is whether the central government has the resources to handle the debt problems of some of these corporations and local governments. And the answer is yes. Beijing has almost four trillion USD of reserves and its overall government debt level as a share of GDP is low.

China actually saves more than it invests; it is one of the few countries where the savings rate is higher than the investment rate. Moreover, the country is still generating substantial balance of payments surpluses. China therefore doesn’t fit into a stereotype of a country in a financial crisis.

More: http://carnegieendowment.or…


2017-11-01 on shanghaiist

Do you know ANYTHING about China or do you lurk here to insult people who do?
https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-11-01 on shanghaiist

See the image, above.


2017-11-01 on shanghaiist

Perhaps you’ve never been around before the President’s motorcade comes through? Here’s what it looks like:
https://i.ytimg.com/vi/PM-r…


2017-11-01 on theduran

Excellent, comprehensive summary. Add the World Bank’s Special Drawing Rights (SDRs)–which are for Central Banks’ use–and the pieces are now in place for a dollar takedown, the speed and steepness of which will not be determined by the USA. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-10-31 on shanghaiist

Looks like Anytown, USA before the Presidential motorcade passes through. And the US President really IS a scary guy: he has people kidnapped, tortured and murdered every day, without trials or laws. And secretly bans 50,000 of us from flying–and won’t say why..


2017-10-29 on fortruss

“”There is a need to increase pressure on the DPRK to seat it at the negotiating table. We strongly support economic sanctions,” ”

The DPRK has sat at the negotiating table often, and made agreements that the West has always broken.


2017-10-28 on shanghaiist

“The wide-ranging address, which was aimed at initiating a “new era” in Chinese politics, was short on actual policy specifics and deadlines, but familiarly long on meaningless platitudes “.

Hardly.

Had you actually listened to the speech you would have understood why it took so long and why experts around the world are still saying things like, “It’s a huge deal.. It suggests that Socialism with Chinese Characteristics is a viable counter-model to the presumption of western liberal democracy and Capitalism. In a sense, what Xi is setting up here is not only a clash of civilization and values, but one of political and economic systems. (Orville Schell, Author: ‘Wealth and Power: China’s Long March to the Twenty-First Century’).

Xi is constitutionally mandated to give a full report every five years and, since his administration has accomplished so much (stuff like making China the world leader in science and technology, eliminating urban poverty, finishing the northern leg of the SN Water Diversion) and it cost so much, he had no choice but to describe it all.

Then, far from a shortage of deadlines, he gave three big ones–2020, 2035 and 2049–and described exactly what would be accomplished by then. Again, stuff like eliminating rural poverty (for the first time in 5,000 years) by 2020, etc.

Why write about China if you don’t know anything about it and don’t care? Why waste people’s time?


2017-10-28 on theduran

Always good to hear another side of the story. Too bad the media never even rose to this level of refutation.


2017-10-27 on agueos

“Because the population of the city is expected to rocket to more than 50 million by 2050”?? No. Beijing’s population is capped. It’s not going to rise at all; that’s why they’re doing JingJinJi.

“The greater recovery rate still does not ensure enough water to meet demand or even offset the steady decline of groundwater in the area.”?? The South-North Diversion Project has already stopped or reversed that trend.


2017-10-26 on bloombergview

Uh huh. And which are criminals selling illegal drugs, is the biggest supplier of cocaine, etc. destabilizing countries all over the world?


2017-10-26 on bloombergview

You’re confusing the PRC with the CIA.

They’re two distinctly different organizations.


2017-10-26 on bloombergview

Brilliant summary. Many thanks. I’ll pass it on and tweet it.


2017-10-26 on inquireropinion

What countries?

Developed, rich Greece was ordered to sell Piraeus by the EU because the Greek government and people are corrupt and incompetent at the national level. China was the high bidder in an open auction and has made it a huge success and even bigger employer.

Developing Sri Lanka ordered Hambantota built but then realized that it lacked the expertise to operate it so asked China to operate it the same way Singapore operates dozens of ports around the world. So Sri Lanka gets 1000% more shipping business, 1000% more employment and 1000% more port revenues–without spending–or owing–a dime.


2017-10-26 on inquireropinion

The countries that acquire the infrastructure control the infrastructure. They also control their sovereign assets like raw materials. Unlike America, China does not station troops in 112 client countries to enforce its will.

China has only been giving substantial aid for 10 years. The West has been giving it for over a century. But China has done more good for Africa in ten years than the West did in 100.


2017-10-26 on bloombergview

I’ll tell you what the World Bank said and every survey shows, “We can reasonably expect the virtual elimination of extreme poverty in China by 2022”.

According to Gallup, 97% of rural people–who account for 90% of China’s poor–own both homes and land. www.gallup.com/poll/15082/h…

The Fao’s Food Insecurity Index shows China’s poor people MUCH better off than America’s. http://www.fao.org/state-of…

Though Health Minister Li Bin[1] confessed that seven million people were still impoverished by medical bills, she pledged appropriate treatment for all of them by 2020: “No one will be left behind. This goal is crucial to the national poverty relief campaign”. By 2018, basic old-age pensions had risen for the thirteenth straight year without a rise in taxes.

I know that this comes as a shock to you and many Westerners because our media protects us from the raw data, but these are simply facts. As is the fact that China’s 252 million urban Chinese families have net worths 200% bigger than their American counterparts.

[1] Development of China’s Public Health as an Essential Element of Human Rights. Maternal mortality dropped from 88.9 per 100,000 persons in 1990 to 19.9 per 100,000 persons in 2016; and infant mortality declined from 34.7 per 1,000 in 1981 to 7.5 per 1,000 in 2016.


2017-10-26 on bloombergview

That’s correct, at least in our sense of what ‘poverty,means. 97% of poor chinese own their homes outright and experience much lower food insecurity than our poor.
Why do you scoff?


2017-10-26 on bloombergview

Do Singaporeans trust their media? Do Americans and Chinese trust theirs?

Reporters Without Borders, RSF, ranks America’s media freedom highly, at forty-first in the world. America’s 320 million citizens consume twelve million copies of twenty-six newspapers daily. Twenty percent of them trust their privately owned, largely unregulated media.

RSF ranks Singapore’s media freedom near the bottom, at 154th. Six million widely traveled, highly educated Singaporeans consume 1.3 million copies of eighteen newspapers daily and seventy percent of them trust their media.

RSF ranks Chinese media 176th, among the least free on earth. China’s 1.4 billion well traveled, well educated citizens consume eighty-million copies of four hundred newspapers daily. Eighty percent trust their media.

In every country on earth with a mix of government- and privately-owned media, citizens trust the government media more than their privately owned counterparts. Could it be that government regulation–even government control–produces more trustworthy media than private ownership?

Like people everywhere, the Chinese are most interested in local news, followed by regional, national and, lastly, foreign affairs and, like everyone else, verify their media’s narratives directly: was the promised infrastructure installed? Did the new health card work at the hospital? Is their child’s school getting fiberoptic? Has their wage rise matched national averages? Those interested in foreign news can compare it their own experience (130 million Chinese–ten percent of the population–traveled abroad in 2017) or stay at home and watch CNN, RT and the BBC.


2017-10-26 on bloombergview

The USA has 2 million prisoners in its jails who never received a trial.

The US also murders 2,000 more of its citizens before even charging them with an offence.

I’d call that political.


2017-10-26 on bloombergview

China has been emancipating fourteen million poor people each year and eliminated urban poverty in 2016. But there are still twenty million poor people in–1.8% of the population–though the World Bank predicted, “We can reasonably expect the virtual elimination of extreme poverty in China by 2022”. President Xi considers that a failure.


2017-10-25 on inquireropinion

Dambisa Moyo, in her book, ‘Dead Aid’, says Chinese aid and trade has done more good for Africa in ten years than the West did in 100.

As I said, they trade infrastructure (which cannot be stolen as easily as Western ‘aid’) for raw materials–at market prices. What’s wrong with that?


2017-10-25 on bloombergview

“1) Those for show Chinese “elections” don’t matter — the outcome is essentially already decided by the CCP.”

I have proof that those for show American “elections” don’t matter — the outcome is essentially already decided by the people who own the politicians.

Here’s my proof: Princeton’s Gilens and Page, examining the causes of Americans’ 52% participation, found that ‘the preferences of the average American appear to have a near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy’.[https://scholar.princeton.e…].

Given that Chinese electoral turnout is 62%, where’s your proof?


2017-10-25 on bloombergview

Au contraire! No matter how you slice it–constitutionally, electively, popularly, procedurally, operationally, substantively or financially–China comes out ahead.

Its elections–in which everyone is entitled to vote–has higher turnouts than America’s and are overseen by the Carter Center, for example.

In survey after survey, it’s the most trusted government in the world and its policies enjoy the highest support.


2017-10-25 on bloombergview

Ah! that explains why no one is poor in China and everyone receives an education, has paid employment, more than enough food and clothing, access to medical services, old-age support, a home and a comfortable life.

It also explains why, according to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese thought their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

And, according to the Edelman 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/…

Thank you for your insights.


2017-10-25 on bloombergview

Agreed! If you look under the hood, you’ll find that China is probably the most democratic country on earth.

No matter how you slice it–constitutionally, electively, popularly, procedurally, operationally, substantively or financially–China comes out ahead.

In survey after survey, it’s the most trusted government in the world and its policies enjoy the highest support.

I wrote a brief analysis for the Unz Review recently, ‘Selling Democracy to the Chinese’, which you might enjoy: https://www.unz.com/article….


2017-10-25 on bloombergview

An authoritarian government ‘favors or enforces strict obedience to authority, especially that of the government, at the expense of personal freedom’, right?

So the leader of an authoritarian power would have the sole power to:

Declare war. Frequently.

Issue 300,000 national security letters (administrative subpoenas with gag orders that enjoin recipients from ever divulging they’ve been served);

Control information at all times under his National Security and Emergency Preparedness Communications Functions.

Torture, kidnap and kill anyone, anywhere, at will.

Correct?

And an authoritarian government would limit personal freedom by

Secretly banning 50,000 citizens from flying and refusing explanations.

Imprisoning 2,000,000 citizens witout trial.

Killing 2,000 citizens each year prior to arrest.

Right?

Since China does none of those things and America does all of them, which has an authoritarian government?


2017-10-25 on wsws

“Barely known five years ago when he became president, Xi has consolidated his position as the “core” or indispensable strongman in the CCP apparatus”.

Wow! That’s a lot to get wrong in a single sentence!

Five years ago he was the son of a Revolutionary Immortal whose first job out of college was Assistant to the Secretary of Defence, had served as a highly acclaimed governor in high profile provinces for decades, was married to the most famous woman in China, had cleaned up Shanghai for the first time in 100 years, organized and run the Beijing Olympics and was Vice President of China.

And ‘strongman’?

Xi has no more power today than 5 years ago. He has more prestige and trust because he’s earned it, but that’s all. He’s still Chairman of the Board who cannot appoint or fire anyone, cannot declare war, cannot introduce legislation without unanimous support of his fellow board members–none of whom he appointed and all of whom have 30 year stellar records in governance. His new title recognizes his accomplishments and was given to him because, in 2021, he will announce China’s new goal for the rest of this century.

That’s why Deng was given the same title: it was he who set the 2020 goal of a xiaokang society for 2020 (which will be attained under Xi): ‘a society in which no one is poor and everyone receives an education, has paid employment, more than enough food and clothing, access to medical services, old-age support, a home and a comfortable life’.

If that’s a ‘strongman,’ we need more.


2017-10-25 on inquireropinion

They trade infrastructure (which cannot be stolen as easily as Western ‘aid’) for raw materials–at market prices.

What’s wrong with that?


2017-10-24 on technode

As any VC will tell you, this is about people, not an abstract technology called ‘AI,’ and China has the people.

Original, radical research in any discipline is done by people with IQs 160+, and China has 330,000 of them, while the USA and the EU between them have 20,000.

Since AI is now a priority, China can assign 16 such people to every one we can muster. Besides, many of America’s leading AI researchers are Chinese and, now that China is pulling ahead in other areas, most of them will gravitate back to the Mother Country, and to the $10 billion AI center now abuilding.

And as to ‘supercomputers and theory are China’s biggest shortcomings,’ China has the world’s fastest supercomputers–by a huge margin–and the most of them. As to theory, who knows?


2017-10-24 on inquireropinion

India’s participation in the BRICS bank, or anywhere, is irrelevant.


2017-10-24 on inquireropinion

India’s participation in anything, anywhere, is irrelevant. Until it stops starving a million children to death each year and provides its people with clean water and toilets, India is nothing more than a blot on human consciousness.


2017-10-24 on inquireropinion

China transformed Piraeus, in bankrupt Greece, into the Med’s leading port and biggest employer and created a win-win in that country, despite its staggering levels of corruption, and it will do the same elsewhere. Just give it time.
.
It not that recipients can’t pay–presuming you’re talking about cases like Sri Lanka and Hambantota Port–but that they do not have the ability to comprehensively and honestly manage big projects like China does. They don’t have enough experienced, skilled, patriotic, honest officials to spare from central government, for example, to handle local problems and rehousing.
.
So the work is left to local, crooked officials who steal the re-housing money that was built into the project budget. And SR’s Trade Ministry is staffed by relatives of political party leaders and are literally clueless about developing relationships with foreign shippers, etc.


2017-10-23 on chinalawblog

Excellent summary! Many thanks!


2017-10-23 on wsws

A wise Latin American diplomat observed that military dictatorships are not evident by men wearing peaked caps giving orders to elected officials, but to budgets.

More than half of America’s discretionary budget is spent on the military and the White House is run by three generals.


2017-10-22 on wsws

” Xi whips up patriotism not only to aggressively promote the interests of the Chinese ruling class, but also to subordinate the multi-millioned working class to those same interests.”

Rubbish. The recent Congress was an opportunity for some brief, well-earned back-patting. Otherwise, Xi spends most of his time damping down patriotism because ordinary Chinese are spoiling for a fight. Gallup surveyed citizens of the major powers in 2015 and asked, “If there were a war involving [your country], would you be willing to fight for [your country]?” Here’s how they responded:
Willing to Fight /Refuse to Fight
Germany 18 percent /62 percent
UK 27 percent /51 percent
France 29 percent /44 percent
U.S.A 44 percent /31 percent
Russia 59 percent /20 percent
China 71 percent /23 percent

And as for subordinating the multi-millioned working class to the interests of the Chinese ruling class, in what ways do the interests of the Chinese ruling class diverge from those of its working class? The working class see little daylight between their interests and those of the ‘elite’ (whose ranks, we should remember, are refreshed–from the bottom–every ten years.

According to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans).

Likewise–and to the author’s point–83% of Chinese say their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). No government in history has received such an accolade from such a broad based, well-educated and prosperous citizenry.
http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…


2017-10-22 on foreignpolicyjournal

“The whole business is an axis between the Chinese state and international finance. ”
A meaningless claim with zero evidence to back it written by someone who knows nothing about China, its government or its foreign policy.


2017-10-21 on chinalawblog

“The number has been on the rise for months. Anyone know why because I sure don’t.”

Let me hazard a guess: Social Credit is coming fast, so scams like this will become 50% riskier each year for the next 3-4 years and scamsters know it.

Imagine extending Amazon’s Customer Reviews beyond products to every manufacturer, vendor, government official, agency and individual in the country. They designed it ‘to promote a harmonious society, establish a culture of sincerity and advance traditional virtues in order to raise the honest mentality and credit levels of the entire society’.

The Social Credit Program invites consumers’ feedback on everything they buy and everyone they deal with–from gas companies to government officials–and ranks them on a thousand-point scale. The media is talking it up: “After graduation, Zhang Hao, 28, found a job at a securities company in eastern China’s Hangzhou city. On his mobile app Alipay, he saw an apartment he liked. Alipay, Alibaba’s mobile payment service, rates its users’ credit based on their consumption and investment habits on their app. Zhang had a high score and so was exempted from the $1,000 rental deposit and the $200 broker’s fee. The experience not only saved Zhang time and energy in renting an apartment, which is often complicated in China, but also gave him a fresh look at the city where he was about to build a career”.

Customers applying for visas who have scores 700 or above (for Luxembourg) or 700 (Japan) need not submit bank records and enjoy waivers on rental deposits, expedited airport security checks, free loaner umbrellas and instant credit approvals: a consumers’ magic carpet that reduces transaction fees, credit losses and, eventually, cost of living.

Oxford’s Rogier Creemers says, “When rules are broken and not rectified in time you are entered in a list of ‘people subject to enforcement for trust breaking’ and denied access to things. Rules broken by corporations can lead to them being unable to issue corporate bonds and individuals being unable to become company directors. Trust-breakers can face penalties on subsidies, career progression, asset ownership and the ability to receive honorary titles from the Chinese government. Those who fail to repay debts are punished by travel restrictions”.


2017-10-19 on theduran

Actually, China has moved away from copying–a long time ago. It’s just that our media didn’t keep us informed.

According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb

China also leads the world in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons and Satellite Quantum Communications.

The same can be said of China’s allegedly mercantilist trade policy–our media has let us down. China depends less on exports than even Canada, and less than half as much as mercantilist Germany. It is close to balance with the world and runs trade deficits with smaller, poorer countries where possible. America’s trade deficit predates China’s entry into the WTO and is, in any case, sui generis. The United States has trade deficits with 101 countries – a multilateral trade deficit in the jargon of economics–that are cumulatively much larger than its deficit with China.

As a former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors and Harvard professor Martin Feldstein says, “every student of economics knows or should know that the current account balance of each country is determined within its own borders and not by its trading partners.”

Basic accounting principles tell us that the United States’ overall trade deficit is the result of a shortage in national savings relative to spending due to excessive government budget deficits and households consuming beyond their means. The countries that show up as being the source of the offsetting trade surpluses are coincidental. (https://www.ft.com/content/…


2017-10-19 on wsws

Venezuela’s voting, counting and verification mechanisms are the most advanced and secure in the world, by a long margin. They are a model for all democratic countries.


2017-10-17 on wsws

“Despite concerted efforts to project the image of a stable, unified leadership, the promotion and glorification of Xi signals the opposite. He is being elevated to the status of supreme leader in a bid to contain factional infighting as the regime confronts a slowing economy and rising social tensions at home, and the growing US threat of trade war and war abroad.”

This is pure, poorly informed silliness. Anyone familiar with Xi’s status amongst his colleagues and the public at large (his polices have 95% public support), let alone his track record and peer support would fall down laughing at such a selection.

If you wish to write about China for an informed audience, do your damn homework first.


2017-10-16 on wsws

“the CCP presides over an extremely unstable capitalist state, with a parasitic super-rich layer that is closely integrated into the ruling apparatus, ruthlessly exploiting hundreds of millions of workers”.

Easy, boy! Easy!

Mao provided an iron rice bowl from cradle to grave: child care, education, job placement, housing, subsistence, health care and elder care and, at his death, China’s GINI was an egalitarian 0.16.

Knowing that the Reform and Opening would change it, Deng warned everyone, “To achieve common prosperity faster we must permit some people and some regions to become prosperous first”.

For the next thirty years, the gap widened as promised and still remains unacceptably wide for a country led by communists and billing itself as socialist.

But today, as expected, the gap (which never got as wide as America’s or the UK’s) is narrowing, and quickly. Some of the gap has existed for millennia: inland provinces have always been poorer than their coastal cousins and rural people have always been poorer than urbanites. A study by the US. National Academy of Sciences[1] found that regional variations account for twelve percent of Chinese inequality (compared to less than two percent in America) and a further ten percent is due to an urban-rural gap that doesn’t exist in the US.

Though China’s GINI was briefly similar to America’s, it has not created as much angst as it does in there because the Chinese, all of whose boats have been lifted by the rising tide of prosperity, have endured regional disparities since the beginning of time and have seen the gap between themselves and neighbors remain steady. People who walked or rode bicycles a generation ago now ride gleaming subways and drive economy cars, even though their better-off neighbors now drive BMWs.

In 2012, President Xi asked officials’ at their annual evaluations, “How much did you improve your region’s GINI in the past year?” and set off a flurry of experiments. Regional capital Chengdu (pop. fifteen million) called public meetings to raise awareness of urban poverty and passed a progressive tax on luxury homes to finance low-income housing. The next year it began moving 100,000 families–handicapped, solo retirees, structurally unemployed and low wage earners with heavy family burdens–into new homes with upgraded infrastructure. The transformation was rapid. By the end of 2017, a Chengdu noodle shop owner offering free meals to the needy said that just two people had taken up her offer and, by 2018, every resident had a home, Chengdu’s housing officials had promotions and their experiment was held up as example for the country.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. By December, 2020, China’s GINI will be in full retreat. And here’s a clue ripped from today’s headlines:

‘Chinese Gov’t Wants More Control Over China’s Tech Companies: China is looking to gain more control over its largest tech companies, including … a draft proposal suggesting a 1 percent government stake in companies in … “Every company will have to do it eventually, so the earlier you get in, the more..’

And, ‘WSJ: Chinese government wants to enter boards of Chinese tech.
In preparations for the Congress, the party has also called on Chinese entrepreneurs to put patriotism before profit. In recent months, tech …’

So stay tuned. The Deng era is ending and Xi is plotting a new, post-2020 GINI course for the country.

[1] Income Inequality in Today’s China, www.pnas.org/content/111/19…


2017-10-16 on truthdig

Someone should do a collection of brief bios of the Human Rights Lawyers who have been arrested in the last two years. The backgrounds I’ve been able to check have all been to Washington and all trained by the US.


2017-10-16 on truthdig

I asked a Chinese friend how she would remember Liu. This is what she wrote me:

“I remember him as a racist, who claimed confidently that “Chinese were totally weak both physically and psychologically”, that “most Chinese university students and graduate students were ‘garbage’”.

I remember him as a colonialist, who maintained undoubtedly that China needed to be a colony for 300 years to have a “real change” and was better to be separated into 18 regions.

I remember him as lazy. Instead of taking the reformist path and leading governance experiments he simply stirred up trouble by advocating impractical ideas.

I remember him as a traitor, who asserted righteously, “I am the ungrateful child digging out the graves of his ancestors, and I am proud of being such a child”.

I remember him as a criminal, who led the 1989 political turmoil that bloodwashed Tian’anmen and caused severe social unrest”.

I remember him as a mercenary who took $2 million from the US government to slander his own country.

I remember him as a clown, whose meticulously-schemed shows were immensely ridiculed by his fellow Chinese and would go down history as a laughable stain.

I remember him as a warmonger who praised the Iraq war and George Bush for attacking Iraq.


2017-10-16 on breitbartproduction

Articles about Christianity in China should always explain that, the last time Christians were given their head in China (in my grandfather’s day) they killed 30,000,000 people and so weakened the government that it collapsed when attacked by foreigners.

Any group human endeavor that depends on unsupported assertions, like religion, are dangerous and need careful control.


2017-10-15 on truthdig

Ai Weiwei is an amusing self-promoter whose vehicle is Western gullibility. The son of high-ranking cultural official and poet, he came to international attention when he claimed to have designed Beijing’s Birds Nest Olympic Stadium, though architect Li Xinggang’s model of of the Bird’s Nest was adopted in April, 2003, long before Ai attempted to join the design team in 2006. When he publicly threatened to boycott the Games, Ai made a serendipitous discovery: Western critics were delighted by an artist who condemned both China and the Beijing Olympics. The US. promptly awarded Ai residency, art commissions flowed and Western media sought his wisdom on every topic. Encouraged, his comments became increasingly contemptuous of China: the country had ‘no hope, no dreams, no future; it was a broken vehicle that would soon disintegrate’.

The Global Times Chinese Edition commented plaintively: “China needs a multiplicity of voices and for this reason diverse opinions should not be suppressed. Ai Weiwei, however, has gone too far in mimicking American ways and his behavior is naive and childish”. Encouraged by the attention, Ai claimed that China had made no progress of any kind in the previous 30 years, that the country had more poor people than ever, that everything was worse and that government leaders were stealing all the money from its citizens.

The media loved him but journalists suddenly abandoned Beijing to report on one of the greatest natural disasters in modern history. Over 200,000 square miles, the Sichuan earthquake killed 100,000 people in 24 hours, left 370,000 injured and 5 million homeless. The government reported that more than 7,000 inadequately engineered schoolrooms had collapsed and The Christian Science Monitor explained why, “Earthquake engineers say that constructing a building to resist a quake of magnitude 7 or 8 is possible but is often considered cost prohibitive…Schools are particularly vulnerable because they are mid-sized buildings, smaller projects for contractors that are paid by [local] government bureaucracies. Two recent earthquakes in Indonesia and in Kashmir also resulted in a disproportionate [number of] student deaths.” Local mayors explained that the schools had been built in the 1980s, when parents were desperate to get children out of substandard buildings including caves that seeped water during winter rains, “We didn’t have much money back then and the schools were the best we could afford”.

Ai rushed to Sichuan with an irresistible story: Chinese authorities were guilty of widespread negligence and malfeasance and thousands of children had died because Party corruption had led to shoddy construction. Ai set up an installation of the dead children’s names, posted the lists on his blog and created an exhibition with children’s backpacks symbolizing their deaths. Ai gathered credulous journalists each day, eager to receive his revelations.

Teams spent months locating and identifying 100,000 bodies and completing engineering surveys and mortality analyses. The final report showed that 99.8% of children under 14 survived the quake and children, virtually all of whom were in school during the worst quake, survived twice as well as adults. But, by the time the report was released, Ai was living in Germany, Western journalists followed his every comment, his global renown had risen and his artworks were selling for millions. When Chinese tax authorities charged him with failing to declare $2.3 million income he posted bail of $1.3 million cash and appealed, claimed victimization and began public fundraising.


2017-10-12 on blacklistednews

Ahem. The 90,000,000 members of the Chinese Communist Party are the country’s elite, and their membership entitles them to several privileges. It also obliges them to several responsibilities.

There’s a lot of dead wood in the Party, accumulated by the usual riffraff who are drawn to power without responsibility. Xi considers them to be corrupt, too, in that they are fakers and takers, not doers and givers. This is a first step towards weeding them out.

And in case anyone thinks that the Communist Party isn’t communist, or imagines that it’s corrupt, here’s some evidence that suggests otherwise:
https://uploads.disquscdn.c….

And here’s some more: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

And still more: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-10-10 on theduran

Agreed.

Our society does not support empathy effectively and our leadership sets a poor example of empathy by heartlessly attacking small countries and letting poor people drown and shooting them in the streets.

That destroys OUR empathy because, as Confucius explained, “The virtue of leaders is like the wind, while that of followers is like the grass: when the wind blows over it the grass will bend in its direction”.

Confucian societies, for all their faults, teach and try to practice empathy or compassion and to support that as a public good. That’s one reason Japan’s GINI coefficient leads the world.

It’s why Communism is acceptable to Chinese: Confucius’ socioeconomic observations predated Marx by 2500 years and were more profound.

Chinese culture has experimented with them for 2,000 years and the Communist Dynasty’s implementation Confucius’ ‘world shared by all alike’ is the best that nation has ever known.

That’s why its government’s approval ratings are in the 90s. China’s ideology was baked in before Jesus was born. A government that checks every Confucian box is a good government. IF they want to wear jeweled robes and perform esoteric ceremonies, fine. If they want to be Puritanical and sober and spout Marxist rhetoric, fine, whatever. Just conform to Confucius detailed instructions and we’ll support you and cooperate with you, just like he said we would.
https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-10-09 on chinalawblog

The Social Credit program should go a long way to cleaning up such scams.


2017-10-08 on lowyinterpreter

Why does The Interpreter delete responses that respectfully present facts that contradict assertions in this article? Is that not the very censorship of which The Interpreter itself complains when it perceives it in China?

To repeat: the statement “It is not demonising China to report what the Chinese government says about itself: that it is a wealthy and powerful Communist Party state that has no time for democratic accountable government, no independent courts, security, or media, that denies universal adult political participation, that offers no protection for the exercise of fundamental rights of freedom of speech, religion or assembly,” is contradicted by well-known facts, in all cases.

For example, in every significant way–constitutionally, electively, popularly, procedurally, operationally, substantively or financially–China is far more democratic than the USA or even Australia. Nor is this mere wordplay, or dependent on tortured interpretations of ‘democracy’.

If The Interpreter is unwilling or uninterested in allowing the matter to be intelligently discussed, why?


2017-10-08 on shanghaiist

I’m just back from Shenzen where my speeds were the same as I get on my 30G fiber service in Chiang Mai, Thailand. I run speed tests occasionally in Thailand (I didn’t in Shenzen) and–allowing for Thailand’s long latency times with foreign sites–I noticed no difference between the two services. Lightning fast with local sites like banks, long latency with overseas sites. Typical, in both cases, of developing countries getting their act together.


2017-10-08 on theduran

Empathy is a learned behavior that ideally matures by age 14. It is expressed in physical actions, of which speech is the least important.

Individuals’ maturity is unknowable until the they are placed under stress (as they were, artificially, in the Milgram experiments), whether positive or negative.

Since balanced, empathetic adults are exceptional in our society, we must assume that we are, collectively, doing a poor job of growing up. We are, as a society, immature in this regard, and obviously so when compared to several Asian societies.

Having grown up in an intentional community which carefully matured its youngsters’ empathy, I can attest to the fact that it is doable but that it does, heh heh, take a village…


2017-10-07 on shanghaiist

Akamai releases quarterly national Internet speed rankings. China is ahead of its GDP per capita ranking.


2017-10-07 on shanghaiist

CIA WORLD FACTBOOK 2016 GDP
1 China $21,270
2 European Union $19,180
3 United States $18,560
https://www.cia.gov/library…

According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb

China leads in all fields of civil engineering, Manufacturing, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-orbit Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons and Satellite Quantum Communications.


2017-10-06 on dezeenhq

Leather. Corinthian leather.


2017-10-06 on lowyinterpreter

“Chinese Government was buying up, controlling and censoring Chinese community media in Australia, that it was compromising the ABC’s Chinese language news services, that it was recruiting (and paying) senior Australian political and business leaders to do its bidding, and that it was setting up propaganda arms within Australian universities”.

The US has done the same, and the US Government is far less democratic than the Chinese Government whether you analyze it constitutionally, electively, popularly, procedurally, operationally, substantively or financially.

So why pick on China, which at least has refrained from killing 20-30 million in recent, senseless wars?


2017-10-06 on southfront

The US warned the Russians ahead of Syria missile strikes – CNBC.com
https://www.cnbc.com/…/th…
Apr 6, 2017 – The US warned the Russians ahead of Syria missile strikes … Following the U.S. attack, the head of Russia’s upper house of Parliament’s …


2017-10-06 on southfront

Approved by the Russian and Syrian military. There were only two breaches, as far as I know.


2017-10-06 on southfront

Step #1 in Every Country’s Independence Playbook! That’s why Turkey ordered it, too. The S-400 is the reason Syria won its war: USAF was confined to agreed-upon targets. Venezuela has lots of smaller-caliber Russian AAMs, but is yet to afford the Rolls Royce of anti-aircraft weapons..


2017-10-05 on nationalinterest

“You speak of democracy and governmental transparency in the Soviet Union, in elections administered by the Communist Party, and then imperialists trying to retroactively justify annexation”. Whereas, in the Free West, elections are administered by the Capitalist Party (most Western nations are one-party (capitalist) states. Don’t confuse factions with parties: what we call ‘parties’ are merely factions. What China’s Party has no factions–nor has China ever permitted them in 2500 years, which is why she’s still going strong..

If you lived outside of Russia you might realize that in real elections, no one ever wins “98%” of the vote. Ever. If you lived outside America, you might realize that ‘the preferences of the average American appear to have a near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy’. That’s Princeton’s Gilens and Page, examining the causes of Americans’ fifty-two percent voter participation. Chinese voter participation is 62%, incidentally. https://scholar.princeton.e…


2017-10-05 on thewirein

“Apart from the limited experience of some nineteenth century societies, all human societies of the past seem to have been based on the institutional unity of society, i.e., one set of institutions was designed to serve both the economic and the political needs of society”.–Karl Polanyi, Five Lectures on The Present Age of Transformation


2017-10-05 on nationalinterest

Ukraine declared its state sovereignty on July 16, 1990. Shortly thereafter in September of that same year, the Crimean Supreme Soviet petitioned the Supreme Soviet of the USSR and the RSFSR to rescind the 1945 decision that stripped Crimea’s autonomous Soviet status and reinstate it as an autonomous republic, just as it was back in 1921.

The proposal was put to a referendum on January 20, 1991, drawing the participation of over 80% of the Crimean public, who collectively voted over 94% in support of the ‘restoration of the Crimean ASSR as a subject of the USSR and as a party to the Union Treaty’, i.e., just over 94% of Crimeans voted to secede from Ukraine a full 23 years before that secession was finally realized.

So in a 1991 referendum on Crimean autonomy and separation from Ukraine, over 80% of the population participated and 94% voted in favor. Fast forward to the 2014 referendum to secede from Ukraine and 83% of the population participated and over 96% voted in favor. Are we seeing some consistency here? Or is this just some strange coincidence?

The people of Crimea, who had voted for independence 15 years previously, then voted, freely, to rejoin their cousins in Russia. The Russian Duma acceded to their request and permitted the reunification to proceed. And 90% of Crimeans are happy today with their choice.

Ukraine seceded legally from the USSR under the Constitution of the USSR. She was not sovereign over Crimea then, the USSR was sovereign over both the Ukraine and Crimea. The constitution recognizes the right of a union republic, which Ukraine was, to secede upon receiving a two-thirds “aye” vote on a referendum. She does not get to take any autonomous bodies with her automatically. She has to tally their referendum votes separately and the Supreme Soviet will decide their ultimate status.

The Supreme Soviet of the USSR had not published such a decision at the time the USSR dissolved itself, so the decision passed to the Supreme Soviet of the RF, both specifically and as a consequence of the RF becoming the universally recognized successor state to the USSR.


2017-10-05 on shanghaiist

Nationmaster, a neutral source of international stats (http://www.nationmaster.com… shows 407 executions in China as the most current reliable figure. That’s a rate of .0000313%. It shows 42 for the USA, a rate of .000011%.

But I would argue that America’s rate of execution is much higher than China’s because the US legally executes 1,000 people per year in the streets and another 1,000 prior to trial–which China does not do (nor does China imprison 2 million people without trial, as America does).

Either the stats are public and reliable, or they’re secret and nobody knows what they are. They cannot, logically, be both.

People can guess about them, or infer them, but they cannot know them. “The basis for gathering estimates on Chinese execution practices is widely available on the (unblocked) internet”.

I’m pretty familiar with Chinese stats and have never seen any reliable ones about executions. Can you provide some links?


2017-10-04 on shanghaiist

Can you explain the absurdity?


2017-10-04 on shanghaiist

“executes more people each year than the rest of the world combined, though it keeps these statistics secret”??
One or the other: if the writer has the stats to justify the claim that China executes more people each year than the rest of the world combined, let’s see them.
If not, shut up.


2017-10-04 on nationalinterest

Ukrainian ian military personnel killed thousands of Ukrainian civilians in the Donbas. The Ukrainian civilians in the Donbas fought back to protect their homes and killed thousands of Ukrainian military personnel. It is a standard civil war which, like America’s, is the most violent kind of war.


2017-10-04 on nationalinterest

The experts are legit.
The quotes are legit.
It doesn’t make any difference who quotes them.
There was no Russian invasion of Ukraine.


2017-10-04 on nationalinterest

The experts are legit. The quotes are legit. It doesn’t make any difference who quotes them. Face it. There was no Russian invasion of Ukraine.


2017-10-04 on nationalinterest

IT has nothing to do with the media. It has to do with the statements made by experts on the ground. That’s what matters.
If you want to query the experts, go ahead.


2017-10-04 on nationalinterest

The invasion of Ukraine is probably the most non-existent war in human history:

Markian Lubkivsky, the adviser to the head of the SBU (the Ukrainian version of the CIA) stated there are NO RUSSIAN TROOPS ON UKRANIAN SOIL. He said the SBU counted about 5000 Russian nationals, but not Russian soldiers in Donetsk and Lugansk Peoples Republics. He further clarified that there were no organized Russian units in Donbass. 
http://www.opednews.com/art…

Former NATO General Kujat: I don’t believe evidence of Russian invasion – ENG SUBS. https://youtu.be/l0_yaWyA-1… Secretary General Lamberto Zannier said he saw no Russian troops in Ukraine. http://sputniknews.com/euro…

Ukraine Chief of Staff Admits No Russian Troops in Donetsk 
http://sputniknews.com/euro…

No Evidence of Russian Military Hardware Presence in Ukraine – French President Hollande
http://sputniknews.com/poli…

NATO Unable to Provide Proof of Alleged Russian Troops in Ukraine
http://sputniknews.com/euro…


2017-10-04 on nationalinterest

Can you be more specific? What is the actual situation and what about my comment exists only inside my head?


2017-10-04 on nationalinterest

And, lest we forget, Dr. Putin’s PhD dissertation topic was….”The Geostrategic Application of Natural Resource Conduits”. He literally wrote the book.


2017-10-03 on nationalinterest

the “smoldering Russo-Ukrainian War”??
There is no Russo-Ukrainian War, smoldering or otherwise. It is a fiction, a myth, a wet dream conjured up by war-hungry nutters. Nothing more.


2017-10-02 on insidehighered

In that case, Chinese universities are getting more bang for their bucks than ours. According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb


2017-09-28 on bloombergview

Res ipsa loquitur, baby. Res ipsa loquitur.


2017-09-28 on bloombergview

Why investigate Tienanmen or Mao’s famine?

The public investigation into Tiananmen as completed on June 19, 1989 and the report issued. What obligation does the Chinese Government have to perpetuate controversies created by American propaganda?

The ‘Mao’s famine’ story was created by propagandists and disproven by the CIA. China’s weather-related harvests were certainly no secret. In 1958, Australia and Canada offered China unlimited credit to purchase their surplus grain but the U.S. Government blocked the shipments and assigned the CIA to monitor the embargo’s success.

As the Agency subsequently reported: “4 April 1961: The Chinese Communist regime is now facing the most serious economic difficulties it has confronted since it consolidated its power over mainland China. As a result of economic mismanagement, and, especially, of two years of unfavorable weather, food production in 1960 was little if any larger than in 1957 at which time there were about 50 million fewer Chinese to feed. Widespread famine does not appear to be at hand, but in some provinces many people are now on a bare subsistence diet and the bitterest suffering lies immediately ahead, in the period before the June harvests. The dislocations caused by the ‘Leap Forward’ and the removal of Soviet technicians have disrupted China’s industrialization program. These difficulties have sharply reduced the rate of economic growth during 1960 and have created a serious balance of payments problem. Public morale, especially in rural areas, is almost certainly at its lowest point since the Communists assumed power, and there have been some instances of open dissidence.

2 May 1962: The future course of events in Communist China will be shaped largely by three highly unpredictable variables: the wisdom and realism of the leadership, the level of agricultural output, and the nature and extent of foreign economic relations. During the past few years all three variables have worked against China. In 1958 the leadership adopted a series of ill-conceived and extremist economic and social programs; in 1959 there occurred the first of three years of bad crop weather; and in 1960 Soviet economic and technical cooperation was largely suspended. The combination of these three factors has brought economic chaos to the country. Malnutrition is widespread, foreign trade is down and industrial production and development have dropped sharply. No quick recovery from the regime’s economic troubles is in sight.”

[www.foia.cia.gov/sites/defa… http://www.foia.cia.gov/sit… http://www.foia.cia.gov/sit…]:

As we now know, Mao quickly righted the ship of state and, as the U.S. National Institutes of Health reported, China’s growth in life expectancy under him “Ranks among the most rapid, sustained increases in documented global history”.

[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.go…]

The Great Leap Famine was a severe food shortage caused by a combination of a 3-year El Nino event and the US Grain Embargo. Even so, per capita grain production was no worse than India’s in those years and India neither reported a general famine nor had food distribution to match China’s.


2017-09-28 on bloombergview

You didn’t ask a question.

You said, “start a discussion on Tiananmen and see how far that goes”.

I started a discussion with Chinese professor of political history in Kunming and, to my surprise, he dug out the photographs of Clinton’s visit and the debate.

When I got back to the States, I checked the NYT archives and, lo and behold…he was telling the truth.


2017-09-28 on bloombergview

Do you know anything about China? Anything at all?
.
In 1998, President Bill Clinton discussed the Tiananmen Square incident for over an hour with President Jiang Zemin on national television, as the New York Times’ John Border reported, “The drama of the meeting came in a remarkable 70-minute news conference, carried live on nationwide Chinese television, in which the two Presidents differed sharply on the nature of personal freedom, the role of the state and the meaning of the Tiananmen Square demonstrations that were violently suppressed by the Chinese Government in June 1989…Mr. Clinton flatly told the Chinese leader that his Government had been ‘wrong’ to use force to end the peaceful demonstrations of the spring of 1989 and that broad personal freedom and political expression were the price of admission to the world community of the 21st century. ‘For all of our agreements, we still disagree about the meaning of what happened then,’ Mr. Clinton said in his opening statement, referring to the violent crackdown on Tiananmen Square the night of June 3-4, 1989, that left hundreds of protesters dead”.
.
More here: http://www.nytimes.com/1998…


2017-09-28 on bloombergview

You asked, “if 99% of north koreans trust what their government says about south korea’s economy, does that mean its true? LOL”

My answer, “What do you mean by ‘true’? If you mean ‘directly, factually, physically verifiable by multiple, qualified people who, after verification, agree’, then comparing North Koreans to Chinese is silly, and deliberately so. The Chinese have the capacity to verify anything that’s verifiable and they exercise that capacity tirelessly. North Koreans don’t.

You stated, “trust in the government is not a good barometer for news veracity LOL”.

My answer, actually, it’s a pretty good proxy, since virtually all media are government controlled. But trust in media is a good barometer for news veracity and, while 80% of Chinese trust theirs, only 20% of Americans trust American media.

Do you trust American media?


2017-09-27 on shanghaiist

Dorsey is in good company with the BBC, whose only regret, I suspect, is that they got caught.


2017-09-27 on bloombergview

Trust but verify. Like people everywhere, the Chinese are most interested in local news, followed by regional, national and, lastly, foreign affairs and, like everyone else, verify their media’s narratives directly: was the promised infrastructure installed? Did the new health card work at the hospital? Is their child’s school getting fiberoptic? Has their wage rise matched national averages?

Those interested in foreign news can compare it their own experience (130 million Chinese–ten percent of the population–will travel abroad in 2017) or stay at home and watch CNN, RT and the BBC.


2017-09-27 on bloombergview

Is he really Falun Gong? How cool must that be!


2017-09-27 on theduran

“The Commission expresses, its belief that those responsible for the crimes committed against the Korean people must be charged as war criminals as defined by the Allied Declaration of 1943 and must be brought to trial by the peoples of the world, as was defined by the same Declaration. The people of Korea are subjected by American occupants to a merciless and methodical Campaign of extermination which is in contradiction not only with the principles of humanity, but also with the rules of warfare as laid down, for instance, in the Hague and the Geneva Conventions. This is being done in the following ways:

a) by the systematic destruction of food, food-stores and food-factories. Forests and ripe harvests are systematically burned by incendiary bombs; fruh trees are destroyed and peasants working in their fields with their animals are killed by machine-gun fire from low-flying planes. By these means the whole people of Korea is doomed to starvation.

b) By the systematic destruction of town after town, of village after village, many of which by no stretch of imagination could be considered to be military objectives or even industrial centres. The aim of systematic destruction is clearly, in the first place, to break the moral of the Korean population and, secondly, to wear them out physically. In these never-ceasing raids, dwellings, hospitals, schools, etc., are destroyed deliberately. Even towns which have already been turned into heaps ashes and in which the surviving inhabitants are reduced to living in dug-outs, continue to be bombed,

c) By systematically employing against the peaceful inhabitants weapons banned by international convention i.e., incendiaries, petrol bombs, napalm bombs, time-bombs, and by constantly machine- gunning civilians from low-flying planes.

d) By atrociously exterminating the Korean population, in the district temporarily occupied by American and Syngman Rhee forces, in the period of occupation hundreds of thousands of civilians, entire families from old men to little children, have been tortured, beaten to death, burned and buried alive. Thousands of others have perished from hunger and cold in overcrowded prisons in which they were thrown without charges being leveled against them, without investigation, trial or sentence”.

–Report of the Committee of the Women’s International Democratic Federation in Korea, 1951 of the Women’s International Commission for the Investigation of atrocities committed by U.S.A. and Syngman Rhee troops in Korea


2017-09-27 on bloombergview

90% of coverage of China is negative, despite the fact the 90% of Chinese trust their government and approve of its government’s policies.

80% of Americans don’t trust their media, even their coverage of domestic news, which they themselves can verify.


2017-09-27 on bloombergview

Both links were to a 2009 incident of a building that fell over. Since 1970, China has built over 200 cities with populations over two million. That incident is statistically insignificant and way out of date.


2017-09-27 on bloombergview

You don’t seem to understand why the WSJ–and most Western financial media are, literally, catastrophically dangerous. Remember how they enabled the GFC fraudsters and have been protecting them ever since?

Remember how they tried to undermine China’s economy so diligently, for decades? No? Then let me jog your memory:
1990. The Economist. China’s economy has come to a halt.
1996. The Economist. China’s economy will face a hard landing
1998. The Economist: China’s economy enters a dangerous period of sluggish growth.
1999. Bank of Canada: Likelihood of a hard landing for the Chinese economy.
2000. Chicago Tribune: China currency move nails hard landing risk coffin.
2001. Wilbanks, Smith & Thomas: A hard landing in China.
2002. Westchester University: China Anxiously Seeks a Soft Economic Landing
2003. New York Times: Banking crisis imperils China
2004. The Economist: The great fall of China?
2005. Nouriel Roubini: The Risk of a Hard Landing in China
2006. International Economy: Can China Achieve a Soft Landing?
2007. TIME: Is China’s Economy Overheating? Can China avoid a hard landing?
2008. Forbes: Hard Landing In China?
2009. Fortune: China’s hard landing. China must find a way to recover.
2010: Nouriel Roubini: Hard landing coming in China.
2011: Business Insider: A Chinese Hard Landing May Be Closer Than You Think
2012: American Interest: Dismal Economic News from China: A Hard Landing
2013: Zero Hedge: A Hard Landing In China
2014. CNBC: A hard landing in China.
2015. Forbes: Congratulations, You Got Yourself A Chinese Hard Landing.
2016. The Economist: Hard landing looms for China
2017. National Interest: Is China’s Economy Going To Crash?

The Chinese trust their media, in fact, they’re the most trusting people on earth. Their media is trustworthy because, like Singapore’s it’s carefully regulated.


2017-09-27 on bloombergview

Try.

And if you ever wonder if a site is blocked in China, check it on Comparitech.com. The sites that are blocked are dangerous ones, like Facebook.

As you’ll recall, after Uyghur terrorists used Facebook to organize a riot and murdered 200 women and children, Facebook refused to assist the Chinese government in identifying the terrorists whereas, in 2013, after a bomb killed three people in Boston, Facebook played a vital role in catching the terrorists through their online accounts.


2017-09-27 on bloombergview

Can you provide a verified, non-trivial example of technology that China acquired illicitly?


2017-09-27 on bloombergview

Really? Can you provide a link to that?


2017-09-27 on bloombergview

China acquired zero tech from espionage. Its IP is either indigenous, licensed and paid for (like HSR), or contributed by the likes of GE (imaging and aerospace).
Espionage allegations in our media are just sour grapes.


2017-09-27 on bloombergview

Those toys were manufactured to Mattel’s specs, not China’s. Even AFTER the scandal, Mattel resisted Congress’ efforts to tighten the specs.


2017-09-27 on bloombergview

Then why is Chinese life expectancy rising while ours is falling? Food and drugs play roles in that in both countries.


2017-09-27 on nationalinterest

“What’s happening here is that China is exploiting the geopolitical standoff between Russia and the United States to obtain ownership and management of critical parts of energy infrastructure”
Russia will help you, China will help you, American will obstruct you. It’s the old ‘good cop, good cop, bad cop’ routine, in which we’re the perennial bad cop.


2017-09-26 on dezeenhq

‘Consists of three buildings, each designed by a different architect’ and looks it.

Just a hodgepodge.


2017-09-25 on southfront

A U.S. Federal Reserve report concluded, “Alternative domestic and foreign sources provide no evidence that China’s economic growth was slower than official data indicate”.

Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies, CSIS, found in 2015 that China’s economy is fifteen percent larger than official figures.

The Peterson Institute of International Economics went further still, estimating[1] that it’s twenty-seven percent bigger than claimed and is on track for $29 trillion by 2020.

Their estimates are in line with Nobel economist Robert Fogel’s 2010 prediction that, by 2040 “China’s per capita income will hit $85,000, more than double the forecast for the European Union and her share of global GDP, 40 percent, will dwarf that of the United States. This is what economic hegemony will look like”. Fogel’s prediction is still on track.

[1] Is China Already Number One? New GDP Estimates. Arvind Subramanian (PIIE)


2017-09-24 on theduran

Thanks. I’m building a file here: https://docs.google.com/doc…


2017-09-24 on theduran

The same tricks are not working as well anymore. MSM credibility is below 20% in the US, and almost as bad throughout the West. They’re losing control of the narrative.


2017-09-24 on theduran

Thanks. The whole thing sounded fishy from the start…


2017-09-23 on theduran

Can you provide a link for Israel’s involvement? It sounds familiar!


2017-09-23 on theduran

Were you equally outraged by Syria’s “Sarin gas”? Iraq’s “WMD”?


2017-09-23 on theduran

I live near the Thai-Myanmar border where 5-10% of the population are Muslim and Thai-Muslim relations are good. There is no word here of one-sided atrocities and a general acknowledgement that ‘Saudi money’ is behind much of the problem. Beware atrocity stories, especially where resources are concerned..


2017-09-23 on theduran

Here’s an excerpt from http://www.gearoidocolmain….

“The United Nations has accused the Government of Myanmar of committing ‘genocide’ against the Rohingya Muslim minority in the country’s troubled Rakhine State. In recent weeks the crisis in Myanmar has escalated, with human rights groups and NGOs publishing copious denunciations of the alleged human rights abuses and mass murder committed by the Myanmar Armed Forces, (Tatmadaw). The Myanmar government claims that they are fighting a war on terrorism against forces which seek to destabilise the state, Islamist forces in particular. They also claim that the so-called ethnic minority commonly referred to as ‘Rohingya’ are really illegal East Bengali immigrants.

Despite thousands of serious allegations of rape, pillage and mass murder committed by these Bengali immigrants in Myanmar, human rights groups and the ‘international community’ have blamed all the violence on the Burmese authorities. Who are the Rohingya and why have they now become the focus of international attention? Why has the position of the Burmese authorities been ignored or dismissed? What geopolitical objectives could be behind an attempt to destabilise the country, as Burmese authorities have alleged?”


2017-09-22 on theduran

Don’t jump to the conclusion that our media propose. Read more widely.


2017-09-07 on bloombergview

I was referring to the State, not the businesspeople.


2017-09-04 on bloombergview

“run by a corrupt, backward-looking, authoritarian regime”? No, no! That’s the USA. Russia is run by competent, decent people and 85% of them say so.


2017-09-04 on truthdig

China is addressing these issues creatively, though you’d never know it from our media..


2017-09-04 on btcfeed

“If I am not mistaken, that would mean any Chinese citizen who would comment on even this very article would have to verifiy their name and online presence. That is outrageous and an egregious violation of the UN’s Declaration of Universal Human Rights.”

Public statements intended for mass consumption and made, presumably, with the intention of influencing mass opinion and action, should be made responsibly and the only way to ensure that is for us to be as present on line as we are with each other at the local bar. That’s what real name registration implies. Nothing more.

‘an egregious violation of the UN’s Declaration’. Which paragraph in the UN Human Rights Declaration are you referring to?



2017-09-02 on theduran

Weirdly, it’s China that’s the real democracy:https://www.unz.com/article…


2017-09-02 on theduran

They’re in great shape financially, according the the BIS. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

Average debt for their peers (way less than Japan’s) fast, sustainable growth, strong public support.

Perhaps you’ve read too many headlines like these:
1990. The Economist. China’s economy has come to a halt.
1996. The Economist. China’s economy will face a hard landing
1998. The Economist: China’s economy enters a dangerous period of sluggish growth.
1999. Bank of Canada: Likelihood of a hard landing for the Chinese economy.
2000. Chicago Tribune: China currency move nails hard landing risk coffin.
2001. Wilbanks, Smith & Thomas: A hard landing in China.
2002. Westchester University: China Anxiously Seeks a Soft Economic Landing
2003. New York Times: Banking crisis imperils China
2004. The Economist: The great fall of China?
2005. Nouriel Roubini: The Risk of a Hard Landing in China
2006. International Economy: Can China Achieve a Soft Landing?
2007. TIME: Is China’s Economy Overheating? Can China avoid a hard landing?
2008. Forbes: Hard Landing In China?
2009. Fortune: China’s hard landing. China must find a way to recover.
2010: Nouriel Roubini: Hard landing coming in China.
2011: Business Insider: A Chinese Hard Landing May Be Closer Than You Think
2012: American Interest: Dismal Economic News from China: A Hard Landing
2013: Zero Hedge: A Hard Landing In China
2014. CNBC: A hard landing in China.
2015. Forbes: Congratulations, You Got Yourself A Chinese Hard Landing.
2016. The Economist: Hard landing looms for China
2017. National Interest: Is China’s Economy Going To Crash?
https://uploads.disquscdn.c…
Stanford economist John Gurley explains, “The strong propensity to treat China as The Enemy has led, in my opinion, to some grossly distorted accounts of China’s economic progress. The picture that is presented by most economic experts is one in which China, while making some progress for a time in certain areas, is just barely holding on to economic life. It is a picture of a China always close to famine, making little headway while the rest of the world moves ahead, being involved in irrational economic policies and offering little reason for hope that the lives of her people will be improved”. In real life, China’s economy is the most predictable on earth:


2017-09-02 on theduran

If you study it, you’ll see that our system weeds out anyone who’s not sociopathic.


2017-08-29 on blacklistednews

The Chinese are weaponizing low stools! Is there no end to their evil?


2017-08-28 on thedailycaller

“Imagine a world where an authoritarian government monitors everything you do, amasses huge amounts of data on almost every interaction you make, and awards you a single score that measures how ‘trustworthy’ you are”.

O. K.

Let’s face it, everything–regardless of its domestic popularity or success–that China has done gets criticized abroad, so let’s look at this more closely.

First, it’s a popular initiative as much as a government initiative: the Chinese are the most trusting people on earth and they’re tired of being scammed online for billions each year. They’re especially trusting of their government and 86% of them say it works for everybody and not just for a fortunate few.

Second, it’s not just for citizens. Government departments, officials, cops, corporations, Supreme Court justices, Congresspeople–everyone gets social credit if they want it (participation is entirely voluntary). Doesn’t this sound better than our system, where private corporations rate us and sell the information to other private corporations and government agencies without our permission and with limited access–but offer no reciprocity? Ask TRW for a rating on a vendor and see how far you get.

Third, it’s 90% carrot and 10% stick: the higher your score the easier your life becomes. Japan and the Netherlands, for example, now offer expedited visa processing for Chinese travelers with scores above 750. Landlords waive deposits if you’re over 800…and so on.

Fourth, it’s part of China’s 2,000-year-old plan to create a datong society in which (to be brief) everybody is taken care of and nobody needs to lock their doors at night–a goal that every Chinese supports and which the government hopes to deliver by 2049. That means they have to hustle.

In short, our media are interpreting yet another Chinese policy in Western terms. China is nothing like us. Nothing. It’s a different world and it does things accordingly.


2017-08-28 on technode

“China’s Social Credit System, a government initiative which aims to assign a “social credit” rating to every citizen based on their financial behavior, personal information, and online activity, has earned a bad reputation abroad”.

Let’s face it, everything–regardless of its domestic popularity or success–that China has done has earned a bad reputation abroad, so let’s look at this more closely.

First, it’s a popular initiative as much as a government initiative: the Chinese are the most trusting people on earth and they’re tired of being scammed online for billions each year. They’re especially trusting of their government and 86% of them say it works for everybody and not just for a fortunate few. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

Second, it’s not just for citizens. Government departments, officials, cops, corporations, Supreme Court justices, Congresspeople–everyone gets social credit if they want it (participation is entirely voluntary). Doesn’t this sound better than our system, where private corporations rate us and sell the information to other private corporations and government agencies without our permission and with limited access–but offer no reciprocity? Ask TRW for a rating on a vendor and see how far you get.

Third, it’s 90% carrot and 10% stick: the higher your score the easier your life becomes. Japan and the Netherlands, for example, now offer expedited visa processing for Chinese travelers with scores above 750. Landlords waive deposits if you’re over 800…and so on.

Fourth, it’s part of China’s 2,000-year-old plan to create a datong society in which (to be brief) everybody is taken care of and nobody needs to lock their doors at night–a goal that every Chinese supports and which the government hopes to deliver by 2049. That means they have to hustle.

In short, our media are interpreting yet another Chinese policy in Western terms. China is nothing like us. Nothing. It’s a different world and it does things accordingly.


2017-08-23 on ceprnet

“Al Jazeera is the first news organization to report these figures from the Social Security Administration (SSA), which were released late in October [https://www.ssa.gov/cgi-bin…]. The median wage — half of workers make more, half less — came to $27,519 last year, virtually unchanged from 2011. Measured in 2012 dollars, the median wage was down $4″. http://america.aljazeera.co….

The SSA gives “Average and Median Amounts of Net Compensation for 2015” as $46,119.78 and $29,930.13 adding, “Another measure is a median. For our wage data, the median wage (or net compensation) is the wage “in the middle.” That is, half of the workers earned below this level. The table below shows that the median wage is substantially less than the average wage. The reason for the difference is that the distribution of workers by wage level is highly skewed”. https://www.ssa.gov/oact/co…


2017-08-23 on ceprnet

“Median annual household income in February was $58,714, according to Sentier Research. On an inflation-adjusted basis, this was about flat with February 2016 and below February 2000. Median income means 50% make more and 50% make less”. Divide $58,714 by average household size, 2.4.

Or refer to Gallup’s “Worldwide, Median Household Income About $10,000” which quotes US median per capita income as $15,484.


2017-08-22 on ceprnet

the American worker who earns a median wage of $35,000 to $40,000 a year? Median wage is about $26,500.


2017-08-13 on 80k

Take these findings to China. They have an unequalled database of successful and failed trials in every imaginable area. And a remarkably successful track record…



2017-08-11 on shanghaiist

Yep. It will be just like this chart..only twice as big as the USA https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-08-11 on shanghaiist

Easy. Take Akaimai’s data from 2007, draw a straight line through Q1 2017 and continue to 2027. That’s where China will be. It’s the most predictable country on earth, by a huge margin.


2017-08-11 on shanghaiist

Only if that economy is growing three time faster than the competition and doubling everyone’s wages ever ten years.
Then it’s OK.


2017-08-10 on shanghaiist

Akamai’s quarterly State of the Internet reports are generally considered the most authoritative. https://www.akamai.com/us/e…

Here are 2017 Q1 figures for China:

Global Rank: 74

Q1 2017 Avg. Mbps: 7.6

QoQ Change: 20%

YoY Change: 78%

This puts China in line with its peers ranked by GDP per capita.


2017-08-04 on nationalinterest

Here’d s list of recent Indian aggression:

1947 Annexation of Kashmir. http://www.counterpunch.org
http://thediplomat.com/2015

1949 Annexation of Manipur. http://www.tehelka.com/mani

1949 Annexation of Tripura. http://www.crescent-online….

1951 Annexation of South Tibet: http://kanglaonline.com/201
http://www.mainstreamweekly…
http://chasfreeman.net/indi

1954 Annexation of Nagaland. http://morungexpress.com/de
http://nagalandmusings.blog

1954 Attempt annexation of Sikkim and Bhutan (Failed). http://redbarricade.blogspo…

1961 Annexation of Goa: http://www.ruleoflaw.org.au
http://www.historytoday.com
http://goa-invasion-1961.bl…

1962 Annexation of Kalapani, Nepal: http://www.eurasiareview.co
http://ireport.cnn.com/docs
http://www.sharnoffsglobalv…

1962 Aggression against China: http://gregoryclark.net/red
http://asiapacific.anu.edu….

1971 Annexation of Turtuk, Pakistan: http://www.openthemagazine….

1972 Annexation of Tin Bigha, Bangladesh http://www.dhakatribune.com

1975 Annexation of Sikkim (the whole country): http://nepalitimes.com/issu
http://www.passblue.com/201
http://www.amazon.com/Smash
http://asia.nikkei.com/Poli
http://indiatoday.intoday.i…

1983 (Aborted) Attempted invasion of Mauritius. http://thediplomat.com/2013

1990 (Failed) Attempted annexation of Bhutan: http://www.nytimes.com/1990

2006 Annexation of Duars, Bhutan: http://wangchasangey.blogsp…

2013 Annexation of Moreh, Myanmar. http://www.huffingtonpost.c…

2017 Aggression against China. http://original.antiwar.com
http://www.scmp.com/week-as
https://www.counterpunch.or…


2017-08-02 on technode

Sorry, I missed the key words, ” domestic smartphone market continues to grow’!


2017-07-31 on extremetech

Yes, it’s a bottom feeder tolerated in China because it’s a job provider.


2017-07-31 on extremetech

Foxconn is a Taiwanese company, not a Chinese company.


2017-07-28 on technode

Isn’t that the real story?


2017-07-27 on technode

One article reports an increase, the other a decrease…


2017-07-26 on technode

That’s odd! This report was published this morning:
“In June 2017, China’s mobile market has produced a total of 41.786 million mobile phones, showing a comparative 6.2% decrease; there are 97 newly released models, which has decreased 29.7%. In the first half of 2017, China’s mobile market has produced 239 million mobile phones and released 565 new phone models, showing a decrease of 5.9% and 26.0% respectively.

1. Overview of Mobile Phone Market

In June 2017, China’s mobile market has produced a total of 41.786 million mobile phones, showing a comparative 6.2% decrease; there are 97 newly released models, which has decreased 29.7%. Between January and June, China’s mobile market has produced 239 million mobile phones and released 565 new phone models, showing a decrease of 5.9% and 26.0% respectively.

2. Development of 4G Mobile Phones

In June 2017, 39.615 million sets of 4G phones were produced and 78 new models were released into the market, showing a decrease of 5.0% and 36.1% respectively, and made up 94.8% and 80.4% respectively. Between January and June, 226 million 4G phones were manufactured and 462 new models were released, showing 3.0% and 28.8% decrease respectively, and made up 94.8% and 81.8%.

89.0% of the 4G phones manufactured in June were all network phones. The type of networks supported by the 4G phones are as follows: FDD-97.2%, TD-SCDMA 99.1%, WCDMA 97.0% and cdma2000 89.2%.

3. Foreign Brand Mobile Phones in China

In June 2017, 38.078 million foreign brand mobile phones were produced in China, showing a comparative 7.4% decrease, making up 91.1% of China’s manufactured mobile phones for the same period. There were 91 newly released models, which reflects a 30.0% decrease, and makes up 93.8% of the newly released models in China’s mobile phone market.”

https://www.chinainternetwa…


2017-07-26 on nationalinterest

“China is a republic but not a democracy”?

Seriously?

Let’s compare the degree of democracy in China and the USA by examining it in six dimensions: formal, elective, popular, procedural, operational and substantive.

Formally–in shape or appearance–China’s constitution (Article Three)* makes her a democracy. America’s constitution doesn’t. America is a republic founded by democracy-hating slave-owners who never mentioned democracy in the Constitution or anywhere else except to curse it. China 1–USA 0.

Electively, China has bigger, more transparent elections than the USA that are supervised and certified by The Carter Center, which also runs China’s election website. China 2–USA 0.

Popularly, China has a twenty percent higher voter participation than the USA (62% to 52%), suggesting that more Chinese voters think their vote counts. China 3–USA 0.

Procedurally, China uses a public, democratic process to appoint senior officials and approve all legislation. America? Not so much. American presidential candidates are chosen by wealthy backers and appointed by an unelected group of people called the Electoral College which nobody understands. China 4–USA 0.

Operationally, American presidents operate like like medieval monarchs. They hire and fire all senior officials and frequently order citizens kidnapped, tortured, imprisoned and assassinated without consulting anyone. They can secretly ban 50,000 people from flying on airlines without explanation and take the country to war at any time, for any reason. No Chinese leader–including Mao–could do any of those things. They have to vote on everything, democratically. China 5–USA 0.

Substantively, China’s government policies produce democratic outcomes. Ninety-six percent of Chinese voters say that the government’s policies are just what they want and eighty-three percent say China is being run for their benefit rather than for the benefit of a special group. Only thirty-eight percent of Americans think this of their country. Ninety percent of Chinese voters are pleased with the direction their elected representatives are taking them, compared to twenty percent of Americans. China 6–USA 0.


2017-07-25 on nationalinterest

“Domination” is a Roman game that all Roman successor states (the USA is the current incarnation) have practiced…with precisely the same results: bankruptcy and collapse.

If China ever played that game it was so long ago that it’s been forgotten. For the past 2,000 years she’s played the ‘lead by moral, political and technological example’ game.

As you can see, she’s very, very good at it by now…


2017-07-25 on nationalinterest

Great answer, thanks!

Here’s a bit of matching history to add to your collection: https://www.quora.com/Is-Ch…


2017-07-25 on nationalinterest

“China is a republic but not a democracy”?

Twaddle. Twaddle! I say, sir!

Let’s compare the degrees of democracy in China and the USA by examining six dimensions of democracy: formal, elective, popular, procedural, operational and substantive.

Formally–in shape or appearance–China’s constitution (Article Three)* makes her a democracy. America’s constitution doesn’t. America is a republic founded by democracy-hating slave-owners who never mentioned democracy in the Constitution or anywhere else except to curse it. China 1–USA 0.

Electively, China has bigger, more transparent elections than the USA that are supervised and certified by The Carter Center, which also runs China’s election website. China 2–USA 0.

Popularly, China has a twenty percent higher voter participation than the USA (62% to 52%), suggesting that more Chinese voters think their vote counts. China 3–USA 0.

Procedurally, China uses a public, democratic process to appoint senior officials and approve all legislation. America? Not so much. American presidential candidates are chosen by wealthy backers and appointed by an unelected group of people called the Electoral College which nobody understands. China 4–USA 0.

Operationally, American presidents operate like like medieval monarchs. They hire and fire all senior officials and frequently order citizens kidnapped, tortured, imprisoned and assassinated without consulting anyone. They can secretly ban 50,000 people from flying on airlines without explanation and take the country to war at any time, for any reason. No Chinese leader–including Mao–could do any of those things. They have to vote on everything, democratically. China 5–USA 0.

Substantively, China’s government policies produce democratic outcomes. Ninety-six percent of Chinese voters say that the government’s policies are just what they want and eighty-three percent say China is being run for their benefit rather than for the benefit of a special group. Only thirty-eight percent of Americans think this of their country. Ninety percent of Chinese voters are pleased with the direction their elected representatives are taking them, compared to twenty percent of Americans. China 6–USA 0.

Not only are the Chinese beating us at science, they’re beating us at the ballot box.

P.S. Sooner or later, people are going to notice…


2017-07-25 on evonomics

As he said, “I SHOULD SAY that what we want is not no planning, or even less planning, indeed I say that we almost certainly want more. But the planning should take place in a community in which as many people as possible, both leaders and followers, wholly share your own moral position. Moderate planning will be safe if those carrying it out are rightly orientated in their minds and hearts to the moral issue”. –J.M. Keynes.


2017-07-25 on nationalinterest

Our combat record is 0 for 20. Who would you bet on today, given the ass-kicking they gave us in Korea?


2017-07-24 on lowyinterpreter

Fleets win battles. Economies win wars. China’s economy is the biggest, fastest-growing on earth…


2017-07-24 on evonomics

Eclectic is probably the best word for it. Deng wasn’t kidding when he talked about black and white cats. He gave them 40 years to catch America or ‘lose citizenship from the earth’ and told them it was a race for survival. He didn’t stop being Communist, but his nationalist (survivalist) side came to the fore. https://uploads.disquscdn.c…

All his planners had 160 IQs and they invited the world’s best economists to spend time with them (floating down a river on a cruise boat so as not to be interrupted).

They took the best advice from both sides, non-ideologically, as Deng had instructed them, and modeled scenarios in which to test various strategies and tools.

They’ve retained that flexibility all along (as you can tell from those headlines, many prominent Western economists didn’t see how they could escape the consequences of previous policy decisions) and guided a huge team of horses using very loose reins for 40 years, at a full gallop, without a serious screwup.

That’s economics raised to the level of art. So artful that they’ve managed to hide 15-20% of their GDP. It’s actually much bigger than they let on, as the chart shows. And their debt is negligible, despite the shrieks.

And predictable? I can tell you, with solid documentation, where China will be by the end of 2020 and the end of 2049, and even where it’s heading after 2049.

They know where they’re headed alright, but they don’t yet know how they’ll get there.

So they’ve broken the anticipated challenges into discrete elements and asked 33 provincial governors to figure out solutions for those problems by trial and error.

Here’s the fun part: the governors who come up with the best solutions (which will eventually be rolled out nationwide) automatically become candidates for the presidency and prime ministership.

Isn’t that cute? I call it government by carrot.


2017-07-22 on truthdig

The article implies that Britain won the war. It didn’t. Russia won the war and, by the time Britain was willing to land on French soil again, Germany had been defeated.


2017-07-22 on lowyinterpreter

America’s leadership in Asia? Leadership?
Seriously, guys, America’s DNA hasn’t been leaderly since WWII, and even then it followed the USSR on the battlefield.


2017-07-20 on extremetech

Bradley Manning was not free to come and go, either, and he did not conspire against his country for 30 years. Ditto Edward Snowden and Julian Assange.

Here you go:

2005: $136,000; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

2006: $136,000; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

2007: $145,000; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

2008: $150,000; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

2009: $213,000; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

2010: $220,000; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

Total sum from NED to «Democratic China, Inc.»: $1,000,000

2. Liu Xiaobo has also received money from National Endowment for Democracy (NED) as president of «Independent Chinese PEN Centre, Inc.»:

2005: $99,500; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

2006: $135,000; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

2007: $135,000; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

2008: $152,350; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

2009: $152,950; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

2010: $170,000; http://www.ned.org/region/a…

Total sum from NED for «Independent Chinese PEN Centre, Inc.»: US $844,800


2017-07-20 on extremetech

The evidence that he worked for the US government is on the US Government’s own website, linked to above.The fact that he was a millionaire from his US Government income is at the same location. Do the math.
The fact that he was free to come and go is that he came and went.
Presenting facts, however unfamiliar they may be, is not ‘propaganda’. They’re just fact.


2017-07-20 on extremetech

Far from being enslaved, he was a millionaire, free to come and go to his employer, the US, whenever he chose.


2017-07-20 on extremetech

The National Endowment for Democracy’s website, believe it or not! http://www.ned.org/region/a…

Hong Kong Magazine article: http://www.open.com.hk/old_…


2017-07-19 on extremetech

We know, don’t we, that Nobel Peace Prize laureates like Kissinger and Obama were mass murderers? So, before canonizing people like Professor Liu, why not learn a little about him? Here’s some background:

In a 1988, in an interview with Hong Kong’s Liberation Monthly (now Open Magazine), Liu was asked what it would take for China to realize a true historical transformation. He replied: ““Modernization means whole-sale westernization, choosing a human life is choosing Western way of life. Difference between Western and Chinese governing system is humane vs in-humane, there’s no middle ground… Westernization is not a choice of a nation, but a choice for the human race”

[It would take] 300 years of colonialism. In 100 years of colonialism, Hong Kong has changed to what we see today. With China being so big, of course it would require 300 years as a colony for it to be able to transform into how Hong Kong is today. I have my doubts as to whether 300 years would be enough.” Since colonization had recently killed millions of Chinese and plunged the country into a century of poverty and despair, ordinary Chinese were outraged by Liu’s statement so Chinese police asked him if he were planning to restore colonization and, when he said, “No,” they took no action.

In 1989, Liu flew back from Columbia University to lead the Tiananmen demonstrations. He was subsequently detained for 18 months before his trial but the judge released him for time served on the grounds that he had encouraged students to leave the Square peacefully.

In 1995, the police took Liu into custody for launching a petition campaign on the eve of the sixth anniversary of the Tiananmen incident, calling on the government to reassess the event and to initiate political reform. He was sentenced to stay home and watch TV for nine months.

In 1996, he was released in February but arrested again in October for the October Tenth Declaration on cross-Straits policy, which he co-authored with prominent dissident, Wang Xizhe. He was ordered to serve three years of re-education through labor “for disturbing public order”.

In 2004 Liuhepublished an article in support of Bush’s war on Iraq, titled “Victory to the Anglo-American Freedom Alliance”, in which he praised the U.S.-led post-Cold War conflicts as “best examples of how war should be conducted in a modern civilization.” He wrote “regardless of the savagery of the terrorists, and regardless of the instability of Iraq’s situation, and, what’s more, regardless of how patriotic youth might despise proponents of the United States such as myself, my support for the invasion of Iraq will not waver. Just as, from the beginning, I believed that the military intervention of Britain and the United States would be victorious, I am still full of belief in the final victory of the Freedom Alliance and the democratic future of Iraq, and even if the armed forces of Britain and the United States should encounter some obstacles such as those that they are currently facing, this belief of mine will not change.” He predicted “a free, democratic and peaceful Iraq will emerge.” During the 2004 US presidential election, Liu again praised Bush for his war effort against Iraq and condemned Democratic Party candidate John Kerry for not sufficiently supporting the wars in which the U.S. was then involved. He commented on Islamism that, “a culture and (religious) system that produced this kind of threat (Islamic fundamentalism), must be extremely intolerant and blood-thirsty.”

In 2006, Liu Xiaobo wrote an article for a Hong Kong magazine in 2006 where he basically repeated it (if you’re in mainland China like me, you may need a VPN to view that link). Important paragraph below (translation mine):

這句話,不過是我至今無改的信念的極端表達而已,即,中國的現代化需要經過長期的西化過程方能實現。因此,官方的批判也罷,愛國憤青的口水也好,每每想起,我都懷著感激,讓我有機會即興發揮。

This comment [about the 300 years of colonization] is only an extreme expression of a belief I still hold today: that is, China’s modernization can be realized only through a prolonged period of westernization. Therefore, the government’s criticisms [of me] are fine, the splutterings of those patriotic angry youth are also fine; I am still often grateful that I had the opportunity to speak that line.

And while I think there are plenty of valid complaints about the Chinese political system, some of which LXB voiced himself, the fact that he is getting so much attention in the Western media is in no small part because of the fawning and largely uncritical attitude he had towards the political elite in the US and the UK. If the English-speaking activists calling LXB’s death an outrage have the same opinion of the West’s treatment of Edward Snowden or Julian Assange, which are in many ways similar, I would be surprised.

In 2008, on the eve of the Beijing Olympics, he wrote and publicly circulated a document, Charter ’08, calling for China to adopt a Western political system, a free market, transfer of state-owned enterprises to private ownership and privatize all land–policies that ruined Russia and is currently ruining the USA. Liu had timed his campaign to coincide with Uyghur and Tibetan rioters who murdered hundreds and the U.S. Government-sponsored NGO, Reporters Without Borders urged a boycott of the Olympics because of ‘brutal repression’ (despite a notable absence of government brutality).

In 2009, Liu was given an 11-year sentence for instigating subversion of State power. Investigators discovered that Liu had been secretly receiving money from the U.S. Government and prosecutors charged him with being an undeclared, paid agent of a hostile foreign power attempting to subvert and overthrow the government under a statute similar to the U.S. Foreign Agents Registration Act, FARA (22 U.S.C. § 611 et seq.) Liu pleaded ‘freedom of expression’ but was judged to be a clear and present danger and also unrepentant, so he was sentenced to 11 years. Even under US law (Schenck v. United States) political speech can be reasonably limited if the government deems it ‘clear and present danger’.

Liu also failed to declare his income for tax purposes.

Here is a record of his payments from the US Government’s National Endowment for Democracy* to Minzhu Zhongguo, Democratic China, Inc., which Liu founded. In 1991, Allen Weinstein, who helped draft the legislation establishing National Endowment for Democracy (NED), candidly said: “A lot of what we do today was done covertly 25 years ago by the CIA”. In effect, the CIA launders money through NED. (The Washington Post, Sept. 22, 1991). Western media simply reported that Professor Liu was an innocent man fighting for democracy. More on the Western media coordinated narrative here.

2005: $136,000

2006: $136,000

2007: $145,000

2008: $150,000

2009: $195,000 + $18,000 (supplement): $213,000

2010: $220,000

Total sum from NED to Democratic China, Inc., $1,000,000

Mr. Liu received additional money from NED for being the president of Independent Chinese PEN Centre, Inc.:

2005: $99,500

2006: $135,000

2007: $135,000

2008: $152,350

2009: $152,950

2010: $170,000

NED payments for «Independent Chinese PEN Centre, Inc.»: US $844,800. Professor Liu’s total receipts from NED: US$1,844,800, about 14 million yuan.

Imagine you are a black person and another black dude comes to you and talks to your face.

“We black people got rid of shackles way too early.”

“We lack the social progress, cultural maturity, and even civilized mental and physical traits to go for it on our own.”

“Oh we’d be far better off if we were to be enslaved 300 years more.”

And the best part:

“Hey don’t get me wrong, I do think slavery was something in the past.”

Now, what would you think of him?

A f**king racist Uncle Tom, that’s who he is.


2017-07-18 on nationalinterest

How come America, with so much superior military hardware and unlimited money has never won a war?


2017-07-18 on nationalinterest

Enough of your endless ad hominems. Answer my question.


2017-07-17 on nationalinterest

How come America, with so much superior military hardware and unlimited money has never won a war?

Hint: The answers to your question and mine are the same.


2017-07-17 on nationalinterest

There was a 200-year hiatus that the Chinese call the centuries of humilation–after which, they resumed the lead.


2017-07-17 on shanghaiist

While we should all have and treasure our God-given right to bullshit each other about anything that comes into our minds, it’s a different matter if we’re being paid to teach a subject–especially one that we don’t know much about and that is, moreover, politically sensitive.

The Cultural Revolution fits that description well, if only for its vastness, duration and complexity.

But when anyone decides they’re going to describe a still-fresh revolution which, by design, was not a tea-party and involved the forceful overthrow of the elite by the peasants and workers, then they’d better spend a few years preparing their material and checking its accuracy before offering a course on it.

And given that China’s 1% elite were the ones that suffered from the CR–and subsequently regained power–teachers will have to proceed very cautiously because it’s the 1% who run the universities in China, just as they do here.

Here are some thoughts on it by a peasant boy, Mobo Gao: After Mao’s death in 1976, officials whom he’d banished returned and seized power. His successor, Deng Xiaoping, the scion of an elite family, disarmed the villagers–a gesture of distrust for which they never forgave him–and dissolved the communes that had provided their health care and education.

Gao lamented, “Soon after Mao died, his vision of educating workers, peasants, and soldiers to be new leaders of the socialist society was denounced. The new ‘reformers’ charged that worker, peasant, and soldier students were not suited for college education and lacked the cultural background to become the educated and charged that China had wasted ten precious years by not educating its brightest. In 1977 the college entrance examination was reinstated and the Education Reform instituted during the Cultural Revolution was repudiated and abandoned. By 1980 the worker, peasant, and soldier university study program disappeared and, just like all other newborn things in the Cultural Revolution, they disappeared from the red earth of China like falling stars. However, even though the education revolution was defeated, its glory continues to shine–just like the Paris Commune. The education revolution was a successful attempt by workers, peasants, and soldiers to occupy the sphere of ideology. It was an unprecedented milestone in human development on the long road of human emancipation”.

For anyone curious about the experience of the 99%–who still hold annual reunions to celebrate and honor it–I recommend two small books by peasant boys:

“The Unknown Revolution: Life and Change in a Chinese Village,” by Donping Han http://www.amazon.com/Cultu…

“Gao Village” by Mobo Gao.
https://www.amazon.com/Gao-….


2017-07-17 on bloombergview

Why not concentrate on something important and that we can change–us–and forget about China? EXCEPT to ask ourselves every day, “How come a poor country under embargoes and exclusions has managed to pull ahead of us in science, engineering and education in two generations?

In other words, use what China’s doing to get our representatives to wake up, stop squabbling and, um, make America great again?


2017-07-17 on nationalinterest

Yes, until recently, the future always preceded the past but, for some reason, the authorities decided to change that.
What I was lazily trying to explain is that China’s ability to surpass us in science in two generations is consistent with my earlier claim that China has always been the leader in what today we call science and technology and it’s resuming its leadership.


2017-07-16 on bloombergview

Which is why both the World Bank and the CIA report China’s and the USA’s economy in PPP dollars, of course. Silly them.


2017-07-16 on nationalinterest

The past is prelude to the future. Here’s the future: China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb


2017-07-16 on bloombergview

China beat us, and they did it on 20% of our budget (PPP) and their disadvantaged children beat ours by a country mile. It’s not about China. It’s about us.


2017-07-16 on nationalinterest

They were great engineers, but never had professional generals and were surrounded by bad guys.
I don’t have time to address the IP background of the inventions you mentioned but, if you’re interested, read Needham. In the meantime, Zhang Heng invented a precision seismoscope, the world’s first water-powered armillary sphere and a more accurate water clock, improved calculations for pi, documented 2,500 stars and theorized about solar and lunar eclipses a century before Christ. And that forms less than .01% of Needham’s catalog.


2017-07-15 on nationalinterest

All that and much, much more in “Science and Civilization in China” by Joseph Needham.

Curl up tonight with a good book and get back to us when you’ve read its 11,000 pages of diagrams and descriptions. Read. Weep.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/p…“>Science and Civilisation in China. Volume 1: Introductory Orientations<img src=””>


2017-07-15 on bloombergview

The OECD has tested hundreds of thousands of Chinese children

“Andreas Schleicher, who runs the world wide OECD Pisa tests, said they showed that Shanghai was top of the international education rankings.But it was unclear whether Shanghai and another chart-topper, Hong Kong, were unrepresentative regional showcases.

Mr Schleicher says the unpublished results reveal that pupils in other parts of China are also performing strongly.

“Even in rural areas and in disadvantaged environments, you see a remarkable performance.”

In particular, he said the test results showed the “resilience” of pupils to succeed despite tough backgrounds – and the “high levels of equity” between rich and poor pupils.

“Shanghai is an exceptional case – and the results there are close to what I expected. But what surprised me more were the results from poor provinces that came out really well. The levels of resilience are just incredible. Mr Schleicher is confident of the robustness of this outline view of China’s education standards.

In an attempt to get a representative picture, tests were taken in nine provinces, including poor, middle-income and wealthier regions. http://www.bbc.com/news/bus…


2017-07-15 on evonomics

For 70 years, Chinese economists have, like Babe Ruth, called their shots: they’ve predicted, sometimes decades in advance, their direction and trajectory of their gigantic, shambling economy. They have always been right. They are the only economists on earth to make economics predictive and, thus, the only ones to practice it as a science.

Our economists have also predicted the direction and trajectory of China’s economy. They have always been wrong:

1990. The Economist. China’s economy has come to a halt.

1996. The Economist. China’s economy will face a hard landing

1998. The Economist: China’s economy entering a dangerous period of sluggish growth.

1999. Bank of Canada: Likelihood of a hard landing for the Chinese economy.

2000. Chicago Tribune: China currency move nails hard landing risk coffin.

2001. Wilbanks, Smith & Thomas: A hard landing in China.

2002. Westchester University: China Anxiously Seeks a Soft Economic Landing

2003. New York Times: Banking crisis imperils China

2004. The Economist: The great fall of China?

2005. Nouriel Roubini: The Risk of a Hard Landing in China

2006. International Economy: Can China Achieve a Soft Landing?

2007. TIME: Is China’s Economy Overheating? Can China avoid a hard landing?

2008. Forbes: Hard Landing In China?

2009. Fortune: China’s hard landing. China must find a way to recover.

2010: Nouriel Roubini: Hard landing coming in China.

2011: Business Insider: A Chinese Hard Landing May Be Closer Than You Think

2012: American Interest: Dismal Economic News from China: A Hard Landing

2013: Zero Hedge: A Hard Landing In China

2014. CNBC: A hard landing in China.

2015. Forbes: Congratulations, You Got Yourself A Chinese Hard Landing.

2016. The Economist: Hard landing looms for China

2017. National Interest: Is China’s Economy Going To Crash?

https://uploads.disquscdn.c… https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-07-14 on shanghaiist

They used the Japanese technology domestically. The stuff they’re exporting is entirely Chinese IP–and much better than the 20-year-old Japanese stuff


2017-07-14 on shanghaiist

That’s strange. According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb


2017-07-14 on dezeenhq

Looks like an LA version of living death.


2017-07-14 on shanghaiist

China paid $11.4 billion for the IP rights. The Japanese and French engineers didn’t realize that Chinese engineers are better than they are. Tough.


2017-07-14 on nationalinterest

Given China’s huge lead in engineering–a national strength for 2,000 years–it is extremely unlikely that the US can catch up with its 6 successful tests out of seven hypersonic missile tests. According to the Japan Science and Technology Agency, China now ranks as the most influential country in four of eight core scientific fields, tying with the U.S. The agency took the top 10% of the most referenced studies in each field, and determined the number of authors who were affiliated with the U.S., the U.K., Germany, France, China or Japan. China ranked first in computer science, mathematics, materials science and engineering. The U.S., on the other hand, led the way in physics, environmental and earth sciences, basic life science and clinical medicine. China is also rapidly catching up in physics, where the U.S. has long dominated. It is spending more than $6 billion to build the world’s largest particle accelerator, which could put it at the forefront of particle physics. https://tinyurl.com/ydeqeqnb

We’re basically screwed…


2017-07-14 on evonomics

Economics has become more truly scientific in China already. Nobody else is even close.


2017-07-12 on bloombergview

Are you talking about the USA or China?
In the USA an unelected clique of old men (Rupert Murdoch, et al) censors the media and the Internet is not a democracy (it is owned and controlled by a few private corporations–certainly not by you–over which you have no control).

The USA is the place where the security services abduct you without charges and hold you in black sites as long as they want is not a democracy? The US Government has the power, ‘under all circumstances, to ensure national security, effectively manage emergencies and improve national resilience’. But then you gave him even more. Since 9/11 the U.S. Government has issued 300,000 national security letters, administrative subpoenas with gag orders that enjoin recipients from ever divulging they’ve been served. On a day-to-day basis, of course, the government permits private publishers to do the censoring–but only within the range of what it considers acceptable.
The USA practices kidnapping, torture and assassination on a daily basis as a matter of State policy.

The USA doesn’t do what its people want it to do so it’s not a democracy. China does what its people want it to do so it IS a democracy. That’s the bottom line.


2017-07-12 on bloombergview

“in China, the people have no say (mute) because if they say something against the Party they go to jail”. Nope. Harvard Professor Gary King and Harvard PhD candidates Jennifer Pan and Margaret Roberts (along with many others) have just released a fascinating new study: “Contrary to previous understandings, posts with negative, even vitriolic, criticism of the state, its leaders, and its policies are not more likely to be censored. Instead, we show that the censorship program is aimed at curtailing collective action by silencing comments that represent, reinforce, or spur social mobilization, regardless of content.” To put their conclusion even more simply: Chinese netizens can criticize the government all they want, and they won’t be censored for that reason alone.

“But when Xi Jinping came to power he made himself even more powerful, equal and above Mao Zedong by calling himself the ” core leader”. He didn’t become any more powerful. He still needs five or six votes from the Steering Committee to get anything approved to send to the democratically-elected People’s Congress. Same old same old. He didn’t call himself ‘core leader’, either. That was a general acknowledgement–a thank you–for his first term accomplishments, which included giving every Chinese a 50% wage rise, cutting corruption in half and launching OBOR (and the most powerful naval surface vessel afloat), and lots more. He still only earns $69,000 p.a. and doesn’t get a private jet.

“China’s constitution is all about protecting the Party and not the people or the country driven by extreme paranoia that somebody out there is going to destroy the party that even a religious group or a yoga class like the Falun Gong is being harassed and its members imprisoned and kidneys harvested for benefit of the Party”. Harvesting organs from Falun Gong members? We can only dream…


2017-07-12 on bloombergview

Nope. 95% of poor Chinese own their own homes free and clear and they’re less prey to food insecurity than Americans.


2017-07-12 on bloombergview

AND they’re the best in the world. What a double!!


2017-07-12 on bloombergview

Nobody in China is above the law. Right now, the head of its equivalent to Homeland Security, Zhou Yongkang, is serving a life sentence for corruption.

China has prosecuted (and, probably, executed) more corrupt officials than any country in history. In 1983 the grandson of the founder of the Red Army and Head of State, Zhu De, was executed for rape and his father publicly disgraced. In 1995 Yan Jianhong, wife of the powerful Guizhou Party Secretary, was executed for corruption. In 2016 prosecutors charged 63 senior officials and ministers.

Corruption trials are public and former Yunnan Party Secretary Bai Enpei, confessed on camera, “I saw people living in luxurious homes, driving expensive cars and even owning private jets and I told myself that I wanted to live like that”. For taking $36 million in bribes, he was sentenced to death with a two-year reprieve.

Nor is Chinese society seething with unrest. Quite the contrary. According to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese thought their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

According to the Pew Charitable Trusts’ “Nine in ten Chinese are happy with the direction of their country (87%), feel good about the current state of their economy (91%) and are optimistic about China’s economic future (87%).” http://www.pewglobal.org/da…, .

And according to the Edelman 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/… .

Interpersonal trust in China is almost as high as Sweden’s, when people are asked if they agree with the statement “most people can be trusted” (World Value Survey). https://ourworldindata.org/….

The Party blocks the internet and strictly controls social media because it’s afraid that our media will have the same effect on Chinese that it has had on us: to make us vulgar, distrustful, selfish and lawless. 90% of Chinese approve the government’s censorship for this reason.


2017-07-12 on bloombergview

Your link led to an article entitled, “China Lawyers Must Pledge Loyality to Communist Party”.

It’s the Party’s constitutional duty to control the courts as Xiao Yang, a former Chief Justice, explained, “The power of the courts to adjudicate independently doesn’t mean independence from the Party at all. On the contrary, it embodies a high degree of responsibility vis-à-vis the Party’s program. The Constitution emphasizes the leadership of the Communist Party”.

China’s courts work to produce a harmonious society, not to manufacture criminals–and they succeed to a degree unimagined in the West.

Courts can lose their way in narrow legal interpretations of the Constitution (as we saw in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission 558 U.S. 310 (2010)) and forget the big picture.

The Share Production Party has responsibility for the national mission–creating a xiaokang society by 2020–not the courts. It’s the Party’s job to ensure all government agencies serve that goal.

This sounds strange to Western ears and it only works so long as the Party and the government retain the trust of the people which, at the moment, they do.


2017-07-12 on bloombergview

Nope.

Between 40% and 80% of the quarter of the most disadvantaged students in the four provinces of mainland China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Macau, Singapore, Taiwan and Vietnam perform as well as the 25% top-performing students around the world.

China’s progress in education has made everyone sit up: We saw from the last PISA assessments that the 10% most disadvantaged 15-year-olds in Shanghai outperformed the 10% most privileged American students in mathematics.http://www.teachthefuture.org/blog…


2017-07-12 on bloombergview

Or…perhaps, after studying it for 50 years and visiting it many times, I know something about China that you don’t.
Whaddya think?


2017-07-12 on bloombergview

The PISA 2015 assessment of financial literacy was the second of its kind. The results show the extent to which 15-year-old students have the financial knowledge and skills needed to make a successful transition from compulsory schooling into higher education, employment or entrepreneurship. For many 15-year-olds, finance is part of everyday life, as they are already consumers of financial services, such as bank accounts, and earn money from formal or informal small jobs. As they near the end of compulsory education, students will face complex and challenging financial choices, including whether to continue with formal education and, if so, how to finance such study.

Students in Beijing-Shanghai-Jiangsu-Guangdong (China) (hereafter “B-S-J-G [China]”) score at the highest level among the countries and economies that were assessed in financial literacy in 2015 [Figure IV.3.2].

Only 9% of students in B-S-J-G (China) do not reach the baseline level of proficiency (Level 2) in financial literacy (compared to 22% of students on average across the 10 participating OECD countries and economies) [Table IV.3.2]. At best, these students can identify common financial products and terms, recognise the difference between needs and wants, and make simple decisions on everyday spending in contexts that they are likely to have experienced personally. For instance, students performing below Level 2 in financial literacy can, at best, answer a question like INVOICE – Question 1 (available at http://www.oecd.org/pisa/test), which asks them to recognise the purpose of an everyday financial document, such as an invoice.

Some 33% of students in B-S-J-G (China) are top performers in financial literacy [Table IV.3.2], meaning that they are proficient at Level 5 (compared to only 12% on average across the 10 participating OECD countries and economies). These students can analyse complex financial products, solve non-routine financial problems and show an understanding of the wider financial landscape. For instance, students performing at Level 5 are able to answer a question like BANK ERROR – Question 1 (available at http://www.oecd.org/pisa/test), which asks them to identify and respond appropriately to a financial scam e-mail message.

Students in B-S-J-G (China) perform better in financial literacy than students around the world who perform similarly in mathematics and reading. About 73% of students in B-S-J-G (China) provinces perform better in financial literacy than expected, given their scores in mathematics and reading [Table IV.3.11].

The relationship between socio-economic status and performance in financial literacy is above the OECD average, as 17% of the variation in student performance in financial literacy is associated with countries/economies) [Table IV.4.12]. Moreover, students in B-S-J-G (China) who attend schools in cities score 54 points higher in financial literacy than students of similar socio-economic status and at the same level of education who attend schools in rural areas [Table IV.4.15].
https://www.oecd.org/pisa/P…


2017-07-12 on bloombergview

Yep. It’s gonna come as a shock to most of us but, constitutionally, procedurally, morally and consequentially, China is a democracy. Article 3 of its constitution establishes democracy as fundamental. Core Socialist Values (社会主义核心价值观)–official interpretations of Chinese socialism promoted at the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party of China in 2012–are ”prosperity, democracy, civility and harmony; freedom, equality, justice and rule of law; patriotism, dedication, integrity and friendship”. Its 3,200 democratically elected (elections overseen by the Carter Center) representatives have the final say on all senior personnel and all legislation. Its legislation has the support and approval of 93% of its citizens.

Constitutionally, procedurally, morally and consequentially, the USA is not a democracy. Democracy is nowhere mentioned in America’s constitutional documents. The US is a republic and has always been. There is no direct election of the head of state. Its legislation has the support and approval of 20% of the electorate.


2017-07-12 on bloombergview

96 percent of Chinese–who ought to know and who are better educated, informed and traveled than us–disagree with you. Don’t you think you should find out why?


2017-07-11 on bloombergview

Though no match for ultra-democratic Switzerland, China is well ahead of the USA in the democracy stakes, and likely to widen its lead by 2020.

Constitutionally, procedurally, morally and consequentially, China is a democracy. Article 3 of its constitution establishes democracy as fundamental. Its 3,200 democratically elected (overseen by the Carter Center) representatives have the final say on personnel and all legislation. Its legislation has the support and approval of 93% of its citizens.

Constitutionally, procedurally, morally and consequentially, the USA is not. Democracy is nowhere mentioned in America’s constitutional documents. The US is a republic and has always been. There is no direct election of the head of state. Its legislation has the support and approval of 20% of the electorate.


2017-07-05 on chinafilminsider

宣传, propaganda, is a positive, even laudatory term that conceives of the term very much as it was originally used in Latin: spreading (useful or new information). It’s an important, publicly acknowledged element of the Chinese government’s job of educating people about their democracy and developments within it.
Western governments also do propaganda through public statements and media outlets–they just don’t acknowledge it.


2017-07-04 on shanghaiist

But it is a crime in the US, under FARA, to act as the undeclared, paid agent of a foreign power seeking to overthrow the government by force. To do it for 30 years and to do it without declaring the income for tax purposes. That’s what he was charged with.


2017-07-04 on shanghaiist

The point of the article is “Despite calls from around the globe for China to give Liu Xiaobo, recently diagnosed with terminal liver cancer, the choice of where he wants to be treated,”

What arrogant bullshit. The guy’s a traitor who’s always been treated with kid gloves. No he should be allowed to leave prison so the CIA he can pay his bill CIA pay at Sloan-Kettering? Give me a break.


2017-07-04 on shanghaiist

While the Supreme Court has held that prisons and jails must provide medical treatment to inmates, most states don’t do it for free; they can and do charge co-pays before inmates can actually receive care. And Sawyer has found that in many states, prisoners must work for weeks straight simply to be able to see the doctor. It’s unconscionable — and enables more crime.

The dollar amount of co-pays do not seem very high on first glance, typically under $10. But when you take into account the fact that prisoner wages are typically between 14 and 62 cents per hour, that can easily represent a tremendous amount of work. Sawyer compared the number of necessary hours of work to rack up enough for a single co-pay, and multiplied it by state minimum wages to get a sense of what that tiny co-pay means for normal people. She found figures ranging from $69 in South Dakota to $1,093 in West Virginia. And that’s leaving aside the several states, all in the South, which generally don’t pay prisoners at all. Unsurprisingly, Texas is the worst, with a prisoner wage of $0 and an annual $100 medical fee. (Eight states either don’t have co-pays or no co-pay policy, while five others don’t publish wage data.)

And that doesn’t even account for deductions and other fees. Realistically, prisoners will have to rely on donations from friends and family to make that co-pay. And while it’s easier for people outside prison to scrounge up a few bucks, inmates also overwhelmingly come from low-class backgrounds. Inmates’ families are thus less likely to have money to spare — if there is anyone willing to donate in the first place.

A nation that took basic human decency, crime control, and the Eighth Amendment seriously would have a prison system that was tough, but just. Catching and punishing criminals is one of the fundamental tasks of the state, and America does badly at both.


2017-07-04 on shanghaiist

Answer the question: Would Professor Liu have received such good treatment had he committed similar FARA crimes in the USA?


2017-07-04 on shanghaiist

Would Professor Liu have received such good treatment had he committed similar FARA crimes in the USA? I think not.

In 1991, Allen Weinstein, who helped draft the legislation establishing NED, candidly said: “A lot of what we do today was done covertly 25 years ago by the CIA.” In effect, the CIA launders money through NED. (The Washington Post, Sept. 22, 1991.)

Grants from the National Endowment for Democracy (NED), a US government entity, to «Minzhu Zhongguo» or «Democratic China, Inc.», of which Liu Xiaobo is the founder.

2005: $136,000

China 2005

2006: $136,000

China 2006

2007: $145,000

China 2007

2008: $150,000

China 2008

2009: $195,000 + $18,000 (supplement): $213,000

China 2009

2010: $220,000

China 2010

Total sum from NED to «Democratic China, Inc.»: $1,000,000

2. Liu Xiaobo has also received money from National Endowment for Democracy (NED) as president of «Independent Chinese PEN Centre, Inc.»:

2005: $99,500

China 2005

2006: $135,000

China 2006

2007: $135,000

China 2007

2008: $152,350

China 2008

2009: $152,950

China 2009

2010: $170,000

China 2010

Total sum from NED for «Independent Chinese PEN Centre, Inc.»: US $844,800

Total support from NED during these six years is US$1,844,800, which is about 14 million yuan – a huge sum of money in China – where salaries are about 25% of the level in the West.

In addition Liu and his staff has probably also received training from the Americans.

https://blog.hiddenharmonie…


2017-06-30 on spacenewsinc

The PLA’s hyperspectral satellite already as a considerably broader range than its American counterpar


2017-06-27 on nationalinterest

You’re applying post-Westphalian logic to a pre-Westphalian world. Doesn’t make any sense.


2017-06-24 on nationalinterest

“the Wall Street Journal reported in September 2014 that there was 334 Chinese transgressions across India’s border in the first half of that year. That came on the heels on 411 Chinese transgressions the year before, and 426 the year before that. ”

India does not have a border in that area. It has a frontier whose limits are unsettled and unagreed. China regularly offered to trade 90% of the contested frontier land in exchange for a demarcated border but India preferred war. Having lost the ware, India now prefers lies.


2017-06-21 on shanghaiist

“No mere spiritual leader, he was the head of Tibet’s government when he went into exile in 1959. It was a state apparatus run by aristocratic, nepotistic monks that collected taxes, jailed and tortured dissenters and engaged in all the usual political intrigues. (The Dalai Lama’s own father was almost certainly murdered in 1946, the consequence of a coup plot.)

The government set up in exile in India and, at least until the 1970s, received $US1.7 million a year from the CIA.

The money was to pay for guerilla operations against the Chinese, notwithstanding the Dalai Lama’s public stance in support of non-violence, for which he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989.

The Dalai Lama himself was on the CIA’s payroll from the late 1950s until 1974, reportedly receiving $US15,000 a month ($US180,000 a year).

The funds were paid to him personally, but he used all or most of them for Tibetan government-in-exile activities, principally to fund offices in New York and Geneva, and to lobby internationally.” More here: http://www.theage.com.au/ne…


2017-06-20 on technologyreview

Read the UN Human Rights Declaration’s 30 Articles some time. They’re based on the US Constitution and written by American constitutional scholars. China is ahead in 20 of the 30 and ties most of the other 10.
Why? Here’s Jimmy Carter’s explanation, from the New York Times: “THE United States is abandoning its role as the global champion of human rights.

Revelations that top officials are targeting people to be assassinated abroad, including American citizens, are only the most recent, disturbing proof of how far our nation’s violation of human rights has extended. This development began after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and has been sanctioned and escalated by bipartisan executive and legislative actions, without dissent from the general public. As a result, our country can no longer speak with moral authority on these critical issues.

While the country has made mistakes in the past, the widespread abuse of human rights over the last decade has been a dramatic change from the past. With leadership from the United States, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted in 1948 as “the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.” This was a bold and clear commitment that power would no longer serve as a cover to oppress or injure people, and it established equal rights of all people to life, liberty, security of person, equal protection of the law and freedom from torture, arbitrary detention or forced exile.

The declaration has been invoked by human rights activists and the international community to replace most of the world’s dictatorships with democracies and to promote the rule of law in domestic and global affairs. It is disturbing that, instead of strengthening these principles, our government’s counterterrorism policies are now clearly violating at least 10 of the declaration’s 30 articles, including the prohibition against “cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.”

Recent legislation has made legal the president’s right to detain a person indefinitely on suspicion of affiliation with terrorist organizations or “associated forces,” a broad, vague power that can be abused without meaningful oversight from the courts or Congress (the law is currently being blocked by a federal judge). This law violates the right to freedom of expression and to be presumed innocent until proved guilty, two other rights enshrined in the declaration.

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A MEASURE OF CHANGE

Secret ‘Kill List’ Tests Obama’s Principles MAY 29, 2012

In addition to American citizens’ being targeted for assassination or indefinite detention, recent laws have canceled the restraints in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 to allow unprecedented violations of our rights to privacy through warrantless wiretapping and government mining of our electronic communications. Popular state laws permit detaining individuals because of their appearance, where they worship or with whom they associate.

Despite an arbitrary rule that any man killed by drones is declared an enemy terrorist, the death of nearby innocent women and children is accepted as inevitable. After more than 30 airstrikes on civilian homes this year in Afghanistan, President Hamid Karzai has demanded that such attacks end, but the practice continues in areas of Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen that are not in any war zone. We don’t know how many hundreds of innocent civilians have been killed in these attacks, each one approved by the highest authorities in Washington. This would have been unthinkable in previous times.

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These policies clearly affect American foreign policy. Top intelligence and military officials, as well as rights defenders in targeted areas, affirm that the great escalation in drone attacks has turned aggrieved families toward terrorist organizations, aroused civilian populations against us and permitted repressive governments to cite such actions to justify their own despotic behavior.

Meanwhile, the detention facility at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, now houses 169 prisoners. About half have been cleared for release, yet have little prospect of ever obtaining their freedom. American authorities have revealed that, in order to obtain confessions, some of the few being tried (only in military courts) have been tortured by waterboarding more than 100 times or intimidated with semiautomatic weapons, power drills or threats to sexually assault their mothers. Astoundingly, these facts cannot be used as a defense by the accused, because the government claims they occurred under the cover of “national security.” Most of the other prisoners have no prospect of ever being charged or tried either.

At a time when popular revolutions are sweeping the globe, the United States should be strengthening, not weakening, basic rules of law and principles of justice enumerated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. But instead of making the world safer, America’s violation of international human rights abets our enemies and alienates our friends.

As concerned citizens, we must persuade Washington to reverse course and regain moral leadership according to international human rights norms that we had officially adopted as our own and cherished throughout the years”.

Jimmy Carter, the 39th president, is the founder of the Carter Center and the recipient of the 2002 Nobel Peace Prize.


2017-06-20 on cartoonbrewlive

“the Chinese government has embarrassed itself with a straight out act of political censorship, revealing the deep schism that exists between its official authorities and the country’s most innovative artists.”

It has not embarrassed itself where it matters, with the Chinese people. They’re 80% supportive of their government’s censorship policies, with 10% saying it’s too lax. They have their reasons, none of which is described here.

Autre pays, autre moeurs…


2017-06-19 on theasanforum

‘It is difficult to see how Washington, or anyone else, can compete.’. Quite so.

To quote the late Lee Kuan Yew, “The size of China’s displacement of the world balance is such that the world must find a new balance. It is not possible to pretend that this is just another big player. This is the biggest player in the history of the world”.


2017-06-19 on themonthly

Meanwhile, China’s schools are drawing ahead of ours. China’s, for God’s sake. http://oecdeducationtoday.b…


2017-06-17 on technologyreview

The police are unarmed and less frequently brutal than any force on earth.
The jails are more humane than others, a major factor in the low rate of recidivism.
You need to spend some time in China. The actual China, and talk to actual Chinese. Fox News is not a substitute.


2017-06-14 on hooverinstitution

Try getting the Capitalist Party voted out of power in the US. Same difference.


2017-06-14 on hooverinstitution

Don’t confuse parties and factions. The USA has one party, the Party of Property or the Capitalist Party. There are two wings, or factions, within the party but no fundamental difference between them.


2017-06-12 on nationalinterest

For hypocritical baloney, Mattis’ statement takes the cake, “Mattis said the U.S. has “a deep and abiding commitment to reinforcing the rules-based international order. These efforts grew out of lessons learned the hard way, from economic depression and catastrophic wars. The order is based on principles that were embraced by nations trying to create a better world,” he said.Essential to that rule-based order, and essential to economic health globally, according to Mattis, is freedom of navigation in the region, which must be protected”.

The US Navy has long practiced piracy on the high seas and it is time that responsible countries like China curb them. They have not forgotten the Yinhe incident, nor the mining of the Nicaraguan harbors.

If Mattis wants war, he should remember the old truism: fleets win battles, economies win wars. And China’s economy is much, much larger than America’s growing much, much faster, and with far, far greater manufacturing capability.


2017-06-10 on technologyreview

China’s prisons are practically empty and her police are unarmed. The US, on the other hand, kills 2,000 a year in the process of arrest, jails a million a year without trial and holds more than 2 million in hideous jails, many for political crimes.

Chinese pollute on 20% as much as Americans and the country is responsible plenty of environmental good news:

• Energy intensity (units of energy per unit of GDP) is falling 4-5 percent annually and the government singled out America’s Rocky Mountain Institute for helping solve the country’s energy problems, a rare accolade.

• Coal use has been falling for the past four years and the country is on track to overachieve its Paris Climate Agreement de-carbonization goals by 2030, according to the Climate Action study.

• Greenpeace data shows China’s 2015 growth in wind and solar exceeded its growth in electricity demand. In 2016, the country smashed that record and the 2020 solar power capacity installation target is likely to be met in 2018.

• China reduced the proportion of its electricity generated from coal from 82 percent in 2011 to less than 68 percent in 2017 and expects to continue that pace.

• The government is investing as much in clean energy as the U.S. and the E.U. combined, $110 billion, every year and has the largest installed base of wind and solar power on earth.

• China’s own emissions have been falling since 2013 – in parallel with installing enough solar panels to cover three football pitches every single hour of the year.

• In 2016, China installed half the world’s new solar and wind capacity and its wind farms alone could have met half of Britain’s electricity needs.

• Non-fossil fuels will contribute 15 percent of energy by 2020 and 20 percent by 2030.

• Environmental regulations have teeth: government officials’ promotions now depend on their environmental record, while violators–and anyone who fails to report them–incur penalties that accumulate for as long as violations continue.

• Friends of Nature, an NGO, won a 2015 landmark suit against three polluters of agricultural land, all three were jailed paid a multimillion dollar restoration penalty.

• In 2016, NASA satellites reported that China’s levels of PM 2.5, the most dangerous air particles, had dropped 14 percent in 74 key cities.


2017-06-07 on technologyreview

““China leading rather than the U.S. detaches climate policy from other core American values, or what has traditionally been core American values, including human rights, democracy and good governance,” he says. “That’s bad for the world.”??

China has been leading the world in climate policy for some years now, comfortably ahead in research, manufacture and installation of all renewable energy technologies. It also has a comfortable lead in human rights (read the UNHR 30 Articles), democracy (20% higher voter turnout, 400% higher voter satisfaction) and good governance (83% say their country is run for everyone’s benefit vs. 38% in the USA).

It’s game over, I’m afraid.


2017-06-07 on technologyreview

““China leading rather than the U.S. detaches climate policy from other core American values, or what has traditionally been core American values, including human rights, democracy and good governance,” he says. “That’s bad for the world.”??

China has been leading the world in climate policy for some years now, and is comfortably ahead in research, manufacture and installation of all renewable energy technologies. It also has a comfortable lead in human rights (read the UNHR 30 Articles if you doubt this), democracy (20% better voter turnout, 400% better voter satisfaction) and good governance (83% say their country is run for everyone’s benefit vs. 38% in the USA).

It’s game over, I’m afraid.


2017-06-05 on wsws

This story irresponsible nonsense. There was no ‘student massacre’ in Tiananmen Square–partly because the students in the Square were the children of the Party members inside–and every Western Journalist has know this since at least 2010.

The story was thoroughly investigated by the Columbia Journalism Review, journalism’s leading publication, titled, ‘The Myth of Tiananmen’: http://www.cjr.org/behind_t….

CJR’s version has been corroborated by members of the Diplomatic Corps stationed in Beijing at the time, in Britain’s right wing Daily Telegraph and, more recently, thanks to Wikileaks, by United States State Department official cables: http://www.alternativeinsig….

Daily Telegraph: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/…

The Massacre that Wasn’t: http://www.globalresearch.c…


2017-06-04 on wsws

It’s understandable that people think China’s economy has slowed down, even though it has actually accelerated.

Journalists and lazy economists confuse the acceleration rate of China’s economy with its growth. Calling the rate of acceleration ‘growth’ is useless and, in fact, misleading because it tells us absolutely nothing. Perhaps that is why our useless media and equally useless economists universally do it..

They are different things.

6.5% is a ratio expressing its rate of acceleration, not growth. Knowing that ratio, 6.5%, tells you nothing about growth.

Growth is a VALUE–a number or figure–derived by multiplying the rate of acceleration with the previous year’s GDP. It is expressed in RMB or $, not a ratio. Growth $ = Annual GDP $ x Rate of acceleration.

Ten years ago, China’s GDP was $7.6 trillion. Accelerating at 12%, it added $761 billion. Growth = 7.6 x 1.12 = $761B

In 2016, China’s GDP was $21.1 trillion. Growing at 6.7%, it added $1.3 trillion (twice as much as 2006). Growth = $ 21.2 x 1.06 = $1.27T

China’s economy has not slowed down.

China’s growth has speeded up. Because arithmetic says so.


2017-06-03 on wsws

The USAF had the embassy’s coordinates 12 months before the bombing. The Chinese embassy was the only target during the entire war whose coordinates were provided by the CIA.


2017-06-03 on wsws

A paper published by America’s National Bureau of Economic Research, “Global Inequality Dynamics”, found that, recently, the gap grew rapidly in both the U.S. and China. China’s top 1 percent earned 13 percent of all personal income in 2015–double their share in the 1980s–while America’s top 1 percent earned 20 percent, while the share of income of the bottom 50 percent of Chinese fell from 27 percent to 15 percent. But the income share of the bottom 50 percent of Americans collapsed from 20 percent to 12 percent–3 points below China’s. The report concluded, “Policy discussions about rising global inequality should focus on how to equalize the distribution of primary assets, including better education, access to skills and minimum wage reform”.

What I find interesting is not the countries’ figures, but the attitudes of their media and their governments. A Fortune article, “America Is the Richest, and Most Unequal, Country,” reported that the U.S. has the fourth highest income inequality in the world–after Turkey, Mexico, and Chile–but offered no solutions.

The People’s Daily reported similar figures for China under the headline, “New GINI Figures Show Instability Risks, Need for Reform,” explaining, “In developed countries such as the U.S., whose GINI index (GINI measures income inequality–lower is better) sometimes reaches 0.4, disparities in income distribution are eased, step by step, through increasing taxation on the wealthy and improving the welfare system to help the poor. China should learn from America’s experience.”

China’s government has followed the NBER’s recommendations to ‘equalize the distribution of primary assets, including better education, access to skills and minimum wage reform’.

The government is increasing spending on poor children’s education by 20 percent a year, providing skills training for migrant workers and raising the minimum wage every year (by 10 percent in 2017).

Since the GINI index only covers incomes, it misses China’s equal distribution of one important primary asset: 95 percent of her poor people own their homes debt-free and the government is building two million units of low income housing in 2017. However humble their homes might be, ownership takes the edge off poverty. If the GINI index included home ownership the result would be significantly different.

And don’t worry about a bubble: China’s debt load is far, far lower than the USA’s, 90% of it is domestic, and her growth rate is 400% faster. And growth eats debt.


2017-06-02 on wsws

Which statement would you like sources for?


2017-06-02 on wsws

In 1999, U.S. Air Force bombers, using CIA coordinates (CIA director George Tenet told the House Intelligence Committee, “It was the only target we nominated”), dropped five precision bombs on the Chinese embassy in Belgrade, killing three diplomats and seriously injuring 20. The Boston Globe reported, “The brutes in Beijing are responsible for the Chinese people’s belief that the bombing was intentional.” and President Clinton ordered two carrier battle groups into the Taiwan Strait.


2017-06-02 on wsws

Perhaps you’re confusing China with the USA?
Every Chinese has doubled his real wages every decade for 40 years and is on track to do so again by 2020.
Urban poverty was eliminated last year. Rural poverty will be gone by 2020.
90% of Chinese own their homes, and most a mortgage-free.
Food insecurity are much lower in China than in the U.S.

According to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese thought their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

According to the Pew Charitable Trusts’ http://www.pewglobal.org/da…, “Nine in ten Chinese are happy with the direction of their country (87%), feel good about the current state of their economy (91%) and are optimistic about China’s economic future (87%).” 2010.

According to the Edelman 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/… .


2017-06-02 on dezeenhq

Yes!! $10,000 is cheap for us visually-challenged clients. Cheap, I tell you!


2017-06-02 on wsws

“terrorist scares being whipped up by the political and media establishment.”
Is it not conceivable that terrorist scares are also being whipped up by the police and associated ‘security’ agencies.
And is it not also conceivable that their efforts are being coordinated by U.S. ‘security’ agencies?
Just possibly?


2017-06-02 on wsws

Let’s not fall into the MSM gutter of interpreting all news negatively. China has been wooing Germany to anchor the Western end of its Belt and Road Initiative. This announcement suggests that pan-Eurasian peace may be about to break out. Who knows? They may even clean up Afghanistan?


2017-06-02 on wsws

You lost me at “None of Washington’s rivals—..the post-Maoist capitalist oligarchy in China—offer a progressive alternative”.
China is far from being a post-Maoist capitalist oligarchy and most definitely offers a progressive alternative.
China added capitalism to its economic mix in 1980 in order to double the speed of development. “Otherwise,” as Deng Xiaoping told the UN, “China will be bullied”. The bullying subsided in 1989, when the USA stopped bombing China.
Since then, China’s accountable, wildly popular, deeply trusted oligarchy has housed 90% of its people safely in their own homes and doubled their real incomes every decade–and are on track to repeat that performance by 2020.
Deng’s mandate–to establish a xiaokang society (In 2011 China’s Prime Minister described xiaokang as ‘a society in which no one is poor and everyone receives an education, has paid employment, more than enough food and clothing, access to medical services, old-age support, a home and a comfortable life’) expires in 2020, when extreme poverty will be eliminated, and the next goal will be established.
It is bad enough that capitalist media ignore and denigrate this achievement, it is criminal that WSWS follows their lead.


2017-05-31 on theatlantic

Learn from mistakes? That’s only for people who MAKE mistakes, which is why we don’t learn from them, I guess.


2017-05-31 on theatlantic

The basis of the legitimacy of Chinese governments has not changed in 2,000 years: the virtue of its officials as demonstrated by their compassionate care for the people. The Party has done an excellent job in that regard, which is why it is trusted by 80% of Chinese and why its policies have the approval of 93% of them.

The Chinese dream, too, is 2,000 years old, and has been reaffirmed by every Party leader since the Revolution. The Prime Minister described it in 2011 as ‘a society in which no one is poor and everyone receives an education, has paid employment, more than enough food and clothing, access to medical services, old-age support, a home and a comfortable life’. That will be accomplished (for the first time in China’s history) in 2020.

The second stage is a datong society in which (among other things) ‘everyone leaves his outer doors unbolted at night’. That may be set as a 2049 stretch goal.

In any case, China is about to assume moral leadership of the world.


2017-05-31 on nationalinterest

Yes, I checked, too. You’re right. I corrected my reference in an article this morning and have also emailed the authors, Xin Wang and Yi Wen, to ask what happened after the paper was published. I’ll let you know if I hear back from them…


2017-05-30 on nationalinterest

If you read the editorial statement of Nature, the world’s leading publisher of academic research, you will find precisely the same disclaimer. Yet any paper Nature publishes is hailed by the entire scientific world. If it’s published by the Fed, that’s sufficient.



2017-05-30 on nationalinterest

It was published by the Fed on their website. There were no reservations or rebuttals.


2017-05-28 on evonomics

“What we need to find is a unifying formula to define the new paradigm: the leitmotif. Finding it is a tremendous challenge”.

Hardly a challenge. All we have to do is study China’s model–something our economists resolutely refuse to do.


2017-05-28 on nationalinterest

Thanks. I revised it.


2017-05-28 on nationalinterest

Thanks for that. I appreciate your following up. I will correct those links.


2017-05-27 on nationalinterest

“Syrian dictator Bashar Al Assad” is a democratically elected head of state who won 70% of the votes at the last election, a distinction he holds in common with other so-called ‘dictators’ like Dr. Putin and the late, great Hugo Chavez.

“The results include the deaths of more than 9,000 people including 4,000 civilians .. according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a Britain-based monitoring group”.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights is a well-known front for the Syrian terrorists, who are also backed by the UK and US governments.


2017-05-27 on nationalinterest

That was a substantial hint.
About sanity, self-understanding and reality.


2017-05-27 on nationalinterest

It’s time you watched your hero, the Black Knight again.


2017-05-27 on nationalinterest

No responsible agency–not even the CIA–uses nominal figures because ‘nominal’ means ‘in name only.


2017-05-27 on nationalinterest

“you have attempted to substitute size of domestic economy for wealth.”
No, we are talking about the size of domestic economy, not wealth. Remember how this conversation started? I said, “Fleets win battles, economies win wars. By 2020, China’s economy will be 50% bigger than America’s”.

Both of those statements are self-evidently true but you chose to, um, change the subject. As usual.


2017-05-27 on nationalinterest

Agreed, China is becoming central to the world’s thinking again–as a taxi driver in Marseilles told me recently. My line about datong is no my understanding: it’s the last phrase in Confucius’ description of it and–when you think about what would have to happen to make it a reality–a good summary.

Here’s the complete quote: “Ah, the practice of the Great Way, the illustrious men of the Three Dynasties–I shall never know them in person yet they inspire my ambition! When the Great Way was practiced, the world was shared by all alike, junzi were promoted to high office, men practiced good faith and lived in affection. They did not regard as parents only their own parents, or as sons only their own sons. The elderly enjoyed dignified lives, young adults had proper employment, children were educated and widow and widower, orphaned and sick alike received proper care. Men had their work and women their hearths. They hated waste yet did not hoard things for themselves; they wanted their energies fully used, but not for private ends. Therefore evil plotting was prevented and thieves and rebels did not appear so that, at night, people could leave their outer gates unbolted. That was the age of datong, of Grand Unity”.


2017-05-27 on nationalinterest

Really, yes.
Economies really do win wars and theirs is deeper and stronger than ours. It’s also much bigger.

Officially, it was $21.3 trillion in 2016 and, growing at 6.5% for 4 years would take it to $27.4 trillion vs America’s $19.6 trillion. Here’s the IMF’s 2015 GDP figures for China ($19,392.357) and the USA (17,947.000) extended to 2021 at the expected annual growth rate of 6.5%:
IMF: China ($PPP) GDPBillions – USA
2015, 19,392.357 – 17,947.000
2016, 20,853.331 –18,558.129
2017, 22,451.918 –19,284.993
2018, 24,283.717 – 20,145.054
2019, 26,292.649 – 21,016.055
2020, 28,449.948 – 21,873.552
2021, 30,777.173 – 22,765.717

But China’s GDP is understated, as several agencies have testified, meaning that China makes modest, not boastful, claims about its economy. Boastfulness is eventually revealed and the Chinese government has never been shown to have overestimated its national stats in the 60 years it’s been producing them. That’s hardly surprising, since the Steering Committee are mostly engineers, who have a visceral horror of optimistic stats. The U.S. Federal Reserve commissioned researchers to dig deeper and their report, On The Reliability of Chinese Output Figures, concluded, “Some commentators have questioned whether China’s economy slowed more in 2012 than official gross domestic product figures indicate. However, the 2012 reported output and industrial production figures are consistent both with alternative Chinese indicators of the country’s economic activity, such as electricity production, and trade volume measures reported by non-Chinese sources. These alternative domestic and foreign sources provide no evidence that China’s economic growth was slower than official data http://xn--indicate-kq3d.ww…

Several teams of high powered statisticians then looked to see if China is understating her GDP figures and here’s a sample of their findings:

The (very conservative) Peterson Institute of International Economics applied living and production costs differentials between China and the U.S. to estimate the actual size of China’s economy. On production costs, Chinese wages were only a fraction of those in the West so, if wages were equalized, the value of the goods produced could be considerably higher. Taking wage and living cost differences between China and rich countries, they increased China’s 2010 GDP by 27 percent, close to the estimated undervaluation of the renminbi at 30 percent. By using the purchasing power of one US dollar in China compared to the developed world, PPP, and considering the labor income gap between China and other developed economies, the author, Arvind Subrananian, found that the Chinese economy passed the USA’s in 2010, when they were both around $14.5 trillion, and is on track for $28.8 trillion in 2020 vs. America’s $18.8 trillion. http://disq.us/url?cuid=292…

Then The Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., decided it wanted to verify the data independently. Their 2015 report, Broken Abacus, stunned experts by concluding that China’s economy is 15 percent larger than official figures.

This Financial Times article, by the World Bank’s Yukon Huang, China’s Misleading Economic Indicators gives some more insights:
“The last two rebasing exercises were done in 1993, which increased the nominal size of the service sector by 32 per cent and GDP by 10 per cent, and in 2004 which led to another large increase in the share of services in GDP and upped the annual economic growth rate from 9.2 per cent to 9.9 per cent for the previous decade. Ironically, the government was not enthused about these upward adjustments since it weakened China’s case for favourable treatment in international trade and aid negotiations.
A 2008 Morgan Stanley study estimated that Chinese GDP was about 30 per cent higher than official figures, and per capita consumption was as much as 80 per cent higher. Some research surveys show that household income has been understated by some 20-30 per cent of GDP.
“There is some official support for such views. The head of the national accounts department at China’s bureau of statistics acknowledged in 2009 that its household consumption figures are deficient. The statistics are based on an obsolete, 30-year-old sample survey; do not take full account of cash transactions; do not include fully non-cash provision of social services; and have not been adjusted to reflect the market values for owner-occupied housing. Moreover, as a result of high sales taxes, businesses often do not issue receipts leading to household purchases being underreported.
“These conclusions have been given more credence by two Shanghai-based professors, Jun Zhang and Tian Zhu, who concluded that personal consumption was significantly underestimated by as much as 15 percentage points of GDP. This is due to underreporting of housing expenditures; company-provided consumption-related benefits; and informal household income.
“By implication, estimates of the share of investment in GDP are too high. This stems partly from the practice among many companies and government entities to package consumption-type expenditures as investment because of the lingering belief that consumption is bad and investment is good. In addition, GDP estimates of investment do not adequately adjust for the rising cost of land which has soared in recent years.
“Overall, the personal consumption-to-GDP ratio might be closer to 45 per cent rather the reported 35 per cent and the investment ratio about 38 per cent instead of 48 per cent. If so, then China’s consumption and investment ratios are in line with its Asian peers such as Japan, South Korea and Taiwan during their comparable stage of development.
“China’s statistics are flawed but there is probably no systematic intention to bias the results in one direction or another. Contrary to popular beliefs, the existing distortions may actually be giving a more negative impression than the reality”.
By 2040, according to Nobelist Robert Fogel, writing in Foreign Policy,it will be $123 trillion vs. America’s $26 trillion. http://foreignpolicy.com/20…

Want to read more?
Recalculate China’s GDP before rebalancing. FT Guest writer: Ken Peng of Citi Private Bank. http://blogs.ft.com/beyond-…

China’s GDP May Be Up to 10 Percent Bigger Than Thought
Historical GDP of China.
http://www.bloomberg.com/bw…

And, for laughs, “Hedge Fund Plummets 62% After Betting Against the Chinese Economy”.
https://disq.us/url?cuid=29…


2017-05-26 on wsws

“a US warship yesterday violated the 12-mile exclusion zone around Chinese-claimed territory in the South China Sea”.

Not so fast. The US was probably within its (stretched) right of innocent passage and the Chinese were making a ceremonial protest.
It was all very meta, frankly, like the recent bombing of an abandoned Syrian airfield–after giving Russia 48 hours notice.

Sentient beings may actually be coordinating this stuff, we hope.


2017-05-26 on wsws

Usually, when such an order is rescinded, it it because the Internal Affairs and Defense ministers inform the would-be rescinder that majors and officers below that rank have indicated that they will not fire on their own people.
Heads of state will normally kill as many people as it takes to retain power, and Temer appears to be no exception.


2017-05-26 on hooverinstitution

China has entered the final straight in its run for the roses. If it can stay the course, its economy will be 50% bigger than the USA’s by 2020–when Deng’s Reform and Opening mandate will end and a new era begin.

Western analysts are well aware of this and are doing what they can to at least postpone that day when the world faces up to the fact that economies–not fleets or armies–win wars.

And China will have won.


2017-05-26 on hooverinstitution

While it is obligatory to include words like ‘surprisingly’ in headlines, there is nothing surprising about China’s regulatory upgrade. The Ministry announced it after the last stock crash and they’ve followed through in an exemplary manner.
Why not?
Tough, transparent regulation attracts institutional investors and their trillions of dollars. Weak, home-biased regulation…we all know what that attracts.


2017-05-26 on hooverinstitution

China has the most sophisticated governance mechanism of any country on earth. Its feedback loops, countervailing agencies, field trials and consensual approach to legislative development is exemplary.
It’s also rational, which puts it head and shoulders above the ratty, makeshift, failing, Western governance models.
Sooner or later, people will start to notice…


2017-05-26 on hooverinstitution

Thanks for a fair and balanced summary. Official statements are never boring to those who are genuinely interested in state affairs–and anyone who reads this comment–apart from being tragically wonky–is interested in policies and the making of them. Indeed, they are the meat of governance and too easily dismissed.
What fascinates me is the Chinese government’s appetite for self-criticism. If only our political system made such self-correction possible!



2017-05-26 on nationalinterest

Really, yes.
Economies really do win wars and theirs is deeper and stronger than ours. It’s also much bigger.
Officially, it was $21.3 trillion in 2016 and, growing at 6.5% for 4 years would take it to $27.4 trillion vs America’s $19.6 trillion.
But China’s GDP is greatly understated, as numerous agencies have testified, by about 30%.
Adding that 30% back in would make 2020 GDP $36 trillion in 2020.
By 2040, according to Nobelist Robert Fogel, it will be $123 trillion vs. America’s $26 trillion.
Get used to it.

https://piie.com/blogs/real…
https://www.cia.gov/library…
https://www.google.co.th/ur…


2017-05-26 on nationalinterest

‘Given the changes in the international system and the central place of the United States, there is almost no chance that China will return as the unquestioned hegemon in East Asia.’
Comforting to Western readers, perhaps, but not grounded in reality. China will become the global hegemon beginning in 2020, when it (finally!) achieves Deng’s goal of creating a xiaokang society and sets off on its quest to become a datong society.

For those who’ve forgotten: the bottom line for datong is that nobody has to lock their doors at night. It’s a stretch goal, but preparations are already well along and, when the world realizes what the Chinese are up to, the world will follow as surely as the grass bends before the wind…


2017-05-24 on nationalinterest

Fleets win battles, economies win wars. By 2020, China’s economy will be 50% bigger than America’s.


2017-05-23 on japantimes

Fleets win battles, economies win wars. China’s economy is 30% bigger than America’s, with twice the manufacturing mojo and growing 600% faster.
And no American fleet can safely sail within 2,000 miles of China’s coast: her defensive missile suite is the best in the world.


2017-05-02 on shanghaiist

Perhaps Xinhua was merely summarizing the investigation commissioned by Pew Charitable Trusts, a very right wing American foundation:

P E W I N T E R N E T & A M E R I C A N L I F E P R O J E C T

Most Chinese Say They Approve of Government Internet Control– by Deborah Fallows, Senior Research Fellow, Pew Internet & American Life Project March 27, 2008

Many Americans assume that China’s internet users are both aware of and unhappy about their government’s oversight and control of the internet. But in a new survey, most Chinese say they approve of internet control and management, especially when it comes from their government.

According to findings from the fourth and most recent of a series of surveys about internet use in China from 2000 to 2007,1 over 80% of respondents say they think the internet should be managed or controlled, and in 2007, almost 85% say they think the government should be responsible for doing it.

This survey was funded by the New York-based Markle Foundation and directed by an internationally respected research team at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. 2 As required of all public-opinion polling in China, either the survey or the surveyors must be approved by the government, and some topics that Westerners might have liked to see addressed directly, such as censorship, were not. But a close reading of the results and findings highlights the Chinese perspective on some sensitive issues.

The Chinese government has long tried to control its internet in many ways. It censors or blocks politically-outspoken blogs. It has arrested citizens on charges of “inciting subversion” for posting articles in chat rooms critical of the Communist Party. It passes internet traffic through a “Great Firewall” designed to deny access to such international websites as Wikipedia, Technorati, all blogs hosted by Blogspot, and many sites maintained by the BBC. It also censors content on Chinese-based sites dealing with a host of topics, including the religious group Falun Gong, the 1989 Tiananmen incident, corruption among government officials, the independence movement in Taiwan, a free Tibet, various human rights issues, political incidents, or citizens’ uprisings.

The government justifies its control of the internet — like its control of all broadcast and print media — with familiar broad sweeping rhetoric. Most recently, on the brink of ushering in the Year of the Rat, the government issued a regulation forbidding online audio or video content “that damages China’s unity and sovereignty, harms ethnic solidarity, promotes superstition, portrays violence, pornography, gambling or terrorism, violates privacy, damages China’s culture or traditions.” 3

Most readers of the Western press are aware of efforts by the Chinese government to control and criticize the government’s actions and publicize the techniques through which technologically savvy Chinese internet users can work around restrictions. Some analysts also track and interpret the government’s subtler shifts in balance that seek to encourage internet development while still exercising control over it. what its people can read and discuss online. Outside observers and human-rights groups monitor

Some information on internet control issues makes its way inside China as well, within notice of ordinary citizens. Online stories may spread like wildfire before they are discovered and removed by authorities. And an influential and highly informed group of elite Chinese bloggers continues to test the limits and vigilance of the censors.

Alongside outside criticism and internal pressure for liberalization, other evidence suggests that many Chinese citizens do not share Western views of the internet. The survey findings discussed here, drawn from a broad-based sample of urban Chinese internet users and non-users alike, indicate a degree of comfort and even approval of the notion that the government authorities should control and manage the content available on the internet.

The Chinese view of the internet environment: unreliable content and risky experiences

Findings from the survey depict mainstream urban Chinese people as holding a negative impression of many aspects of the online environment, from online content to the effects internet use can have on life. These include:

Declining trust in reliability of online content. Over four years of tracking user reaction, trust in the reliability of online content has fallen by one-half, from 52% in 2003 to 26% now.

Only about one-third of internet users (30%) said they considered online content reliable.5 Non-users were even harsher in this regard with only 18% saying they considered online content reliable.

When internet users were further queried about their trust in different kinds of online content, they overwhelmingly said that they trusted information on government websites more than any other kind of online information. Three-quarters of respondents deemed reliable most or all the information on government websites, compared with 46% for pages from established media, 28% for results from search engines, 11% for content on bulletin boards and in advertisements, 4% for information from individuals’ web pages, and 3% for postings in chat rooms.

In addition, an overwhelming 93% of internet users said they considered much of internet content to be unsuitable for children.

Worries about the pitfalls of internet use. Internet users thought internet use could lead to several bad outcomes: About six in ten, 61%, thought internet users could easily become addicted to the internet, and the same number thought users could easily be affected by online pornography. More than two-fifths, 43%, said the internet could lure users into making the wrong kind of friends, and another 42% said internet use easily presented risks to personal or private information.

These negative impressions were significantly stronger among non-users: 72% were concerned about pornography, 81% about internet addiction, 66% about making the wrong kind of friends, 55% about risks of exposing personal information.

The Chinese solution for internet housekeeping: control and management. 4How would the Chinese clean up what they see as a bad online atmosphere? An overwhelming number of Chinese, almost 84%, agreed that the internet should be controlled or managed, a response rate that has varied little in the surveys conducted since 2003 by Guo Liang, deputy director of the Research Center for Social Development, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. But Guo argues that it is particularly significant now because of stepped-up negative coverage of the internet in the Chinese press, which keeps the topic on the public’s mind.

When asked which online content they thought should be controlled, more internet users targeted the most offensive or annoying content: 87% of internet users would control or manage pornography; 86% violent content; 83% spam or junk mail; 66% advertisements; 64% slander against individuals.

Fewer respondents targeted the very popular but less malicious entertainment and recreation opportunities. Half of respondents said online games should be controlled, and more than one in four (27%) said online chatting should be controlled.

The findings for one type of online content — politics — may seem more puzzling. Since 2005, the percentage of users who say that online content about “politics” should be controlled or managed jumped from 8% to 41%, by far the biggest increase of any items tested.

Guo said that the explanation for this increase probably lies in the spate of widely publicized incidents of fraud, blackmail, sensationalism, and other abuse of Chinese citizens via the internet. The Chinese word used for “politics” in this survey, zhengzhi, is not confined simply to political rights or competition for political control but may be understood to include larger questions of public morality and social values.

When asked who should be responsible for controlling or managing the internet, more Chinese identified the government, 85%, than any other entity. In addition, 79% of Chinese said internet companies should manage or control the internet, just over two-thirds, 68%, identified parents, 64% schools, and 59% internet cafes.

Why are Chinese impressions of the internet so negative and why is government control the answer?

The negatives: a barrage of worries from the press, particularly about children. Guo Liang, who authored the 2007 survey report as well as directing the project, has had much international experience as the Chinese member of the World Internet Project and as a visiting lecturer and scholar at numerous Western universities and institutions. He writes that during the five years of surveying internet use in China, “media reports about negative aspects of the internet have increased both in scope and number.” Indeed, reports linking the internet to unfortunate or unsavory events abound. Many are personal, heavy with human interest and include names, hometowns, and photos. Here is a sampling:

– In January, Beijing Today6 reported on a blogger who documented the two-month evolution of her husband’s affair with a work colleague and her own planned suicide, before she leaped 24 floors to her death. A curious netizen, as internet users are called in China, followed blog clues to track down the unfaithful husband and posted excerpts of

the blog on a major Chinese portal, causing a firestorm of interest in the blog world and the philanderer’s company, which promptly suspended the man (and his paramour) from work.

– Columnist Li Xing describes vicious and often anonymous attacks exploding on the popular blogs or bulletin boards. Sometimes these attacks are leveled against the famous, like film star Zhang Ziyi, for allegedly posing nude. Li Xing likens the violent and

vicious postings and their hurtful effects to slanderous posters plastered on walls during the Cultural Revolution.7

Much of the highest profile press focuses on children and their internet use and abuse. Over half of all internet users in China are under the age of 25, and 20% are under the age of 18. Many have parents who are less sophisticated and more wary about computers and the internet than their children are.

The media, which all operate under direct or indirect state control, warn frequently about internet addiction when discussing technology’s effects on youth. At the end of 2006, the media reported that the Central Committee of the Communist Youth League stated that more than 2 million

children and teens were internet addicts. In 2008, the Xinhua news agency reported that 11% of youth ages 18 to 23 are addicted to the internet.8 Online games are generally considered the

main culprit of addiction, and the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC), which has

tracked the online population since 1997, reported in their latest survey in January 2008, that three-quarter of netizens under the age of 18 have played online games.9 The number of online gamers reportedly grew 23% in 2007.10

Dramatic stories are recounted in the press, telling of young lives ruined, such as those of An Zhiban and Zhang Fei, both of whom beat the odds to escape from rural backgrounds to enroll in China’s prestigious Peking and Tsinghua universities. But then, their internet addiction led to

expulsion, which was followed by rehabilitation and readmission, which then led to relapse and a second tragic expulsion.11

Other stories detail life in the military-like internet addiction rehabilitation centers, and there are statistics from the Beijing Reformatory for Juvenile Delinquents claiming that online violence and pornography influenced criminal behavior in a third of the youthful detainees.

Guo Liang suggested in an interview that stories about children’s internet use, particularly the heavy use of online entertainment, play easily into Chinese parents’ current worry-scheme at this particular moment in China’s history. This is a new era of China’s “little emperors” — the single children born of the one-child policy that began in the early 1980s. These children, often portrayed as pudgy, spoiled children over-indulged with Western fast food treats, are the sole bearers of the burden of hopes and dreams (and future ) of their two parents and four grandparents. In a culture where education is the key to realizing these hopes and dreams, and where studies and exams are the determiner of academic opportunity, the allocation of children’s time is seen as a zero sum calculation: time spent playing on the internet comes at the expense of time spent on studies.

The perceived inevitability of government control. “Who should control the internet?” Guo Liang says, is a “typically American question.” When he decided to include the question in his survey, he knew it was a rhetorical question, and he guessed the answer would be “the government”.

Guo explained that people’s acceptance of government control and management of the internet is born of the realities of modern Chinese governance and a historical sense in which the state is assumed to be broadly responsible for social management and public values.

Since the only legitimate source of authority in many aspects of Chinese life is the state, when Chinese citizens are of the opinion that some aspects of the internet should be controlled, it is natural for them to assume that the state should take the lead in doing the controlling.

Despite the negatives, staggering increases in the Chinese internet population.

According to CNNIC estimates, there were 137 million Chinese internet users at the end of 2006, 165 million by mid-2007, and a whopping 210 million by the beginning of 2008.12

Why, in a highly-charged negative internet atmosphere, are the numbers of Chinese who are going online for the first time simply soaring?

The culture of cool. Despite negative press and despite anxieties and fears about dangers lurking online, Chinese users appreciate the internet for unprecedented opportunities to play and be entertained with cheap games and movies, and to be in touch via blogs and discussion boards with trends, movie stars and bands. Non-users, especially young people, pick up cues that they will be left behind if they don’t get online.

In China, Guo Liang says, internet culture is definitely considered cool. In his survey, more than 80% of Chinese think they might feel out of date or out of touch if they don’t know about the internet.

The demography of the internet user population plays into this sentiment. It skews heavily toward young, well-educated, urban, and male, and its new recruits follow this pattern. Computers and the internet are also seen as a future for many. China claims to turn out more than 350,000

university graduate engineers annually, compared with 134,000 in the United States, although the validity of this estimate depends on the definition of “engineer” and who is doing the counting.13

The cup is half full, with new information and a chance to speak. Findings in the 2007 survey show that although only 26% of respondents consider online content to be reliable, about 95% of Chinese believe they can learn new things by going online.

At academic conferences, professionals relate almost poignant stories of discovery — of finding online content from libraries they could never visit, of virtually sharing ideas with colleagues they would never have met. Lawyers and judges have new access to archives of decisions. Teachers share resources and lesson plans across great distances.

CNNIC reported that one quarter of Chinese internet users write blogs,14 and many more take part in online discussions. Although the West may be most familiar with reports about political blogs in China, most Chinese bloggers — like most American bloggers — are actually keeping diaries of personal thoughts or daily lives and writing about hobbies and pets, about entertainers and pop culture. The internet represents an original chance for ordinary people to be heard or to connect with others around the country as never before.

Looking to the future, as online commercial ventures proliferate — more shopping, more services, more types of transactions — the internet will undoubtedly attract even more users, and the cup will become ever more full.

Co-existence of contradictions. Like many things in China, the internet is struggling into existence in a compromised and often puzzling way. The balance tips back and forth: heavy pronouncements and regulations by the government, and large-scale disregard by local “enforcers” and the users, youthful infatuation with entertainment and deep worry from parents, forces of commerce and exertion of authoritative control, periods of censorship and lulls of calm. And so on. In such a bumpy landscape, tolerance and even expectation of a controlled and managed internet should come as no surprise.

1 “Surveying Internet Usage and Impact in Five Chinese Cities,” Research Center for Social Development, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. November, 2007. Guo Liang, author and director. The full report including topline questionnaire and methodology can be downloaded from the website of the Markle Foundation, which funded the project.

http://www.markle.org/downl…

2 Guo Liang, deputy director of the Research Center for Social Development, Chinese Academy of Social

Sciences, who directed the study and authored the report, describes the interview process as follows: “The survey started with: ‘Hello, I am conducting a survey sponsored by the Research Center for Social Development of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. This is a confidential random survey and your response will remain anonymous.’ The respondents should know they were being questioned by pollsters working for an independent survey company.” He also notes that while CASS is not a government agency, it is funded by the government although this particular study was funded by the Markle Foundation, located in

New York, and that more than 90% of CASS reports are not “official reports.” 3 http://www.marbridgeconsult…

29/article/7063/sarft_mii_co_issue_online_video_regulation

4 http://www.danwei.org/media… 5 Responses for “reliable” include “all reliable” or “mostly reliable”.

6 Beijing Today, January 18, 2008. p. 3

7 China Daily, April 12, 2007. Li Xing, “Freedom to blog is not license to slander” 8 http://news.xinhuanet.com/e…

9 China Daily, January 18, 2008. p. 2

10 http://www.reuters.com/arti… 11 http://www.10thnpc.org.cn/e…

12 Estimates of the size of the Chinese internet population vary a great deal, depending on the definition of

“internet user” among other things. Estimates quoted here are most interesting for their trend, rather than for

their absolute numbers.

13 http://www.businessweek.com… 14 http://www.cnnic.cn/html/Di…


2017-04-30 on shanghaiist

“But those now bowing out are among China’s richest and most skilled. It is a profound indictment of their country that being able to leave it is such a strong sign of success.” ??

The #1 choice of residence for the world’s most mobile people, its billionaires, is Beijing.

The #1 choice for Fortune’s World 500 corporations to locate their headquarters? Beijing.

Quoting The Economist on Beijing is, as I warned, self-defeating.


2017-04-30 on shanghaiist

Here’s the Mandela quote: ““I would put him in Nelson Mandela’s class of persons. Someone with enormous emotional stability who does not allow his personal misfortunes or sufferings to affect his judgment. In a word, he is impressive”. Lee Kwan Yew, One Man’s View of the World. 2013.


2017-04-30 on shanghaiist

If you look at the chart again, you see that 90% of Chinese think their country is on the right track–compared to 38% of Americans. That’s a very serious gap.

A minority of Chinese think that moral decline is the country’s leading problem, according to The Economist but, according to IPSOS, the leading Chinese worry is the environment, at 42%.

The big picture is that the Chinese feel that things are going in the right direction and incidentally, that goodies are being fairly distributed, which suggests that ‘moral decline’ is a personal, not a governmental matter. World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese thought their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

Optimism. According to the Pew Charitable Trusts’ http://www.pewglobal.org/da…, “Nine in ten Chinese are happy with the direction of their country (87%), feel good about the current state of their economy (91%) and are optimistic about China’s economic future (87%).” 2010.

Trust. According to the Edelman 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/…


2017-04-30 on shanghaiist

Quoting The Economist about China is self-defeating. The Economist has predicted 38 “hard landings” for China’s economy since 1981. None has occurred, of course.

Nor does this survey support the ‘moral decline’ worry: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-04-30 on shanghaiist

This doesn’t back up the chart you uploaded: https://uploads.disquscdn.c…


2017-04-30 on shanghaiist

Where do you get such ideas about popular support in North Korea? PBS’s Frontline recently aired a documentary of behind the North Korea scene. [http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pag… ]

Among all of the images of the expected misery, poverty, hunger, want, there was a segment which I thought was greatly overlooked. A quick exchange between a few North Koreans behind closed doors.

NARRATOR: Behind closed doors, even members of the North Korean elite have voiced unhappiness with the regime, like this businesswoman filmed at a private lunch. [subtitles]:

1st MAN: All we’re saying is give us some basic rights, right? We don’t have any.

WOMAN: It’s not like that in China. In China, they’ve got freedom of speech, you know. They went through the Cultural Revolution.

2nd WOMAN: We North Koreans are wise and very loyal. An uprising is still something we don’t understand.

1st MAN: But even that’s only to a certain point.

WOMAN: There can’t be a rebellion. They’ll kill everyone ruthlessly. Yes, ruthlessly. The problem here is that one in three people will secretly report you. That’s the problem. That’s how they do it.

2ndMAN: Let’s just drink up. There’s no use talking about it.


2017-04-30 on shanghaiist

Ad hominem doesn’t cut it. How about you answer my questions?


2017-04-29 on shanghaiist

Kindly favor us with an example of a mass media outlet that is not ‘agenda ridden’.

And, while you’re at it, provide us with a Xinhua headline and link that, in your opinion, constitutes ‘propaganda’.

There’s a pet.


2017-04-28 on nationalinterest

The day when America could establish a red line in the SCS are long gone. No vessel or aircraft, let alone land force can move within 1,000 miles of China’s shore or border without risking immediate destruction. And retaliation against China proper would simply elicit an equal retaliation against the attacker’s mainland. China rules its near seas.


2017-04-28 on nationalinterest

Dare we say ‘win-win’? What a concept!


2017-04-28 on shanghaiist

Perhaps you trust the New York Times more than Xinuhua?

“Police officers in parts of the vast western Chinese region of Xinjiang have been ordering residents to hand over their passports since October, according to residents interviewed by telephone this week and online photographs of orders from local police departments.

At least four official police notices from different areas of Xinjiang, all dated October, have been posted online. They either tell residents to turn in their passports or say that no new passports are available. On microblog platforms, residents from different towns and counties have written that they recently received calls from police officers telling them to bring in their passports.

There is no obvious pattern to the places that are imposing these restrictions; the rules do not appear to be in effect for the entire region”.
https://www.nytimes.com/201….


2017-04-28 on shanghaiist

I trust Xinhua more than I trust me. So would 80% of Chinese. So should you.


2017-04-28 on shanghaiist

Outside your own, direct experience, where do you learn about objective facts?

From the media, like most of us?

To what degree do you trust our mass media? I suspect that you trust it to the degree that its narrative reflects your observations over time–usually, decades.

Why would you imagine that people who are more intelligent, better educated, more widely traveled and with access to the same news sources as ourselves would be any different?


2017-04-28 on shanghaiist

My claims and sources have not changed: In 2008, Reporters without Borders ranked Singapore as 144th out of 173 surveyed countries in terms of freedom of the press.[19] The Singapore Government said it is not ashamed of its low rank for press freedom because it has achieved top ratings for economic freedom and prosperity.[20] Instead of subscribing to the Western press model, it believes that a non-adversarial press can report accurately and objectively. A recent Gallup poll found that 69% of Singaporeans trusted their media.

According to the Edelman 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/


2017-04-28 on nationalinterest

China shoots about 112 people a year in the street. The US shoots 1,000.

Chinese police kill about 200 people a year in the process of arrest. The US kills 2,000.

China’s arrest rate is one fourth of the US’.

China imprisons one-fifth the number of people the US imprisons.

China’s recidivism rate is one-tenth of the US rate.


2017-04-28 on shanghaiist

China is requiring all residents in its northwestern Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region to turn in their passports.
The Global Times reported on Nov. 23 the new policy will help the government “maintain social order.” The predominantly Muslim region, which has around 10 million Muslim Uyghurs, has been subject to a number of crackdowns in an effort to wipe out homegrown terrorists.

One self-claimed Shihezi local wrote on Weibo with the hashtag “Xinjiang passports hand in” on Oct. 25 that “I cannot love Xinjiang any more although I was born and raised there. I hope to get my hukou out of the place and never have any connections with Xinjiang ever.” She then noted on Nov. 18 (links in Chinese, registration required) “without passports I can only take my parents to Sanya [China’s southern city]…I curse those suckers who advocate confiscating passports.”

Four self-claimed Xinjiang locals also said on Weibo they had received phone calls in November from local governments asking them to hand in their passports.


2017-04-27 on shanghaiist

WMD stands for the non-existent Iraqi Weapons of Mass Destruction that 14,000 American media outlets simultaneously claimed were a threat to humanity.

Everyone in China knows that Xinjiang residents can’t keep passports because a minority Xinjiang Muslim group that is supported by the USA have been massacring people. A commonsense public safety measure to protect 99% of the population from terrorists funded by the US Government. (The NED was revealed to be dispensing more than US$200,000 a year to support the World Uyghur Congress, blamed for triggering the unrest. A Uyghur woman, Rebiya Kadeer, now living in suburban Washington after having made it to the US with powerful assistance from the US State Department several years ago, seems to be the organizer – and the recipient of much of the largess).

The US is the world’s leading terrorist and sponsor of terrorism. What else is new?


2017-04-27 on shanghaiist

Can you produce any evidence for your assertion that North Koreans “have nearly 100% trust in the state media and nearly 100% public support of the government”?

Or are you, as usual, making stuff up?


2017-04-27 on shanghaiist

‘The broad masses in North Korea and China only can access the heavily filtered state media propaganda channels, therefore they live in an alternative reality presented to them by the Party’?

How did North Korea creep into this discussion?

Let’s stick with Singapore and China because the broad masses in both those countries have access to the BBC, CNN and just about any medium they want, right on their cel phones. No VPN required in either country.

Neither Singaporeans nor Chinese live in an alternative reality presented to them by the Party. The broad masses of Singaporeans (3 million) and Chinese (500 million) have traveled abroad in the past ten years and, being able to read and comprehend English well, and having been much better educated than our broad masses, have seen what our media have to offer.

If you doubt this, please supply an item of (accurate, non-WMD) information that our media has provided and their media has not provided.


2017-04-27 on shanghaiist

We trust our media to the degree that its accounts of observed reality match our own experience over time.
Singaporean and Chinese media accounts of observed reality match the experience of the Singaporean and Chinese people 400% better than our media’s account matches our experience.
You could all it the WMD effect. Or the Tonkin Gulf effect. Or the Russian invasion of Ukraine effect. Or the Syrian government Sarin attack effect. Or…


2017-04-27 on shanghaiist

How perceptive of you. North Korea and Singapore are almost identical in every respect.


2017-04-27 on shanghaiist

We will live to regret allowing private corporations–with no obligation to tell the truth–to control public information. The Chinese and Singaporeans have not fallen into that trap.


2017-04-27 on shanghaiist

They trust their food just fine. They eat 4,000,000,000 meals every day and their life expectancy is rising while ours is falling.


2017-04-27 on shanghaiist

In 2008, Reporters without Borders ranked Singapore as 144th out of 173 surveyed countries in terms of freedom of the press.[19] The Singapore Government said it is not ashamed of its low rank for press freedom because it has achieved top ratings for economic freedom and prosperity.[20] Instead of subscribing to the Western press model, it believes that a non-adversarial press can report accurately and objectively. A recent Gallup poll found that 69% of Singaporeans trusted their media.

According to the Edelman 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/…


2017-04-27 on shanghaiist

Hmmm. The two most trusted national media are China, ranked #175, and Singapore, ranked #151.

70% of Singaporeans trust their media. 80% of Chinese trust their media.

This is in line with the fact that, the more a State controls its media, the more reliable it is: the BBC, ABC and CBC are all trusted 100% more than their ‘free’ competitoors

Enquiring minds want to know why the George Soros and US Government-funded Reporters Without Borders equate ‘freedom’ with private control of public media?


2017-04-27 on nationalinterest

‘She was indicted last July and forced to stand trial’.
FORCED to stand trial? FORCED?


2017-04-26 on evonomics

I understand your doubts. There are two aspects to polls: the questions and the audience.

The Chinese audience can watch CNN and the BBC any time. 500 million of them, 90% of whom read and understand English well, have traveled abroad in the past decade, and 80% of them trust their media (compared to 20% of us).

Here’s some question-framing (Note how Gallup frames its question): “Between April 3 and 12, the democracy financing branch of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) paid for a Ukrainian opinion survey. The questionnaire was formulated by the Gallup Organization. The International Republican Institute (IRI) of Washington, DC, an association of the Republican Party also funded by USAID and the State Department, sponsored the polling and published the resultson April 24. The full report can be read here.

According to the report, the poll sampling was 1,200 and the procedure was “face-to-face interviews at respondents’ home.” The response rate recorded was 65%. That means that 35% of front doors were slammed shut in the face of the pollsters. Whether that happened before or after the pollsters disclosed they were paid by the US Government is not known. No regional breakdown is reported for the non-responders.

When regional distributions are reported for opinions towards Russian military intervention, constitutional change, intention to vote in the May 25 presidential election, or preference for candidates, those refusing to express a view from the eastern and southern regions ranged between 9% to 12%, two to four times more than those from western Ukraine. The proportion who said they wouldn’t vote in the proposed election, or refused to say, was 39%. In short, the US poll managed not to record the resistance to participating in the election of a near-majority of Ukrainians in the east and south.

The question on Russian intervention in the Ukrainian survey was worded differently by the American poll. The latter asked: “Do you support the decision of the Russian Federation to send its army into Ukraine under the pretext of protecting Russian-speaking citizens?” [http://johnhelmer.net/?p=10640]


2017-04-24 on evonomics

I suspect that the survey results from China that bear on these indices are not what the institutes would predict. According to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government (compared to 37% of Americans). Likewise, 83% of Chinese thought their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups (36% of Americans thought the same). http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

According to the Pew Charitable Trusts “Nine in ten Chinese are happy with the direction of their country (87%), feel good about the current state of their economy (91%) and are optimistic about China’s economic future (87%).” http://www.pewglobal.org/da…,

Trust. According to the Edelman’s 2016 Report, 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/…


2017-04-17 on hmag

Anyone familiar with the Western counterparts of these Chinese media can tell endless tales of similar phenomena. When I first encountered it I suspected US Government trolls–of which there are tens of thousands, apparently–but have come to believe that most apparent trolls are simply people who have learned the same memes from our mass media and are repeating them.


2017-04-12 on wsws

Yep. And may it happen peacefully…


2017-04-12 on wsws

The political dialogue in the USA resembles what we’ve come to expect from Nicaragua. Somebody shoot me.


2017-04-12 on wsws

Just shoot me. WTF is Turkey up to? Its foreign policy seems to be fibrillating, for God’s sake. Who’s the enemy? The EU, Germany, Russia, the USA?
Somebody help me interpret this…


2017-04-07 on southfront

Good point. A friend suggested that the ‘attack’ was pre-arranged (Russia was certainly warned) and that the missing missiles were brought down by ECM while some were let through deliberately. So Trump showed ‘strength’ and appeased the war party while Putin showed capability..


2017-04-07 on southfront

The targeted airport was not protected by Russian AAAM. That’s why it was chosen. The ‘attack’ was designed to cover Trump’s ass, not to do damage or kill people.


2017-04-06 on theatlantic

The author appears to know nothing about China, Chinese politics or Xi Jinping–none of which are mysterious.

Besides, the Chinese government is far less opaque than our own, which is controlled by a secretive and irresponsible oligarchy.

Xi’s entire life has been a matter of public record, especially since he was born to one of the most famous men in the world and married to one of the most famous women.

His public statements match his public accomplishments, his policies have the approval of 93% of his people and his government is trusted by 80% of them.

Empty, negative, speculative nonsense like the present article only obscure China and harm the cause of international understanding and, therefore, of international peace.


2017-04-02 on nationalinterest

My car and I crossed a very blustery Channel on that hovercraft. A magnificent piece of engineering and a lot of fun skimming over 2M waves.


2017-04-02 on nationalinterest

What a load of nonsense. Worthless clickbait.


2017-04-01 on truthdig

The simplest explanation for that seems to be corruption: the margins on nuclear weapons are probably the best in the industry and ‘security’ considerations make investigation impossible/


2017-04-01 on nationalinterest

Sounds about right.


2017-04-01 on nationalinterest

“What remains unknown is exactly how large and powerful the future Chinese fleet will be”

While we don’t know exactly, we do know approximately: China’s economy is 30% bigger than ours and growing 300% faster. Do the math.


2017-04-01 on truthdig

Au contraire, I suggest we distinguish between forest and trees and get behind Trump’s important policies–like preventing thermonuclear war. Trump is the only significant politician who wants to avoid war with Russia and avoiding war with a country that can flatten every American city in 45 minutes should be our first order of business.
Transgender bathrooms and, gasp! even racism can take a back seat to not getting our asses blown off.


2017-04-01 on nationalinterest

Discussions like this should be prefaced by the following reminder: ‘China has 200% more manufacturing capacity that the US, its economy is 30% bigger and is growing 300% faster. It is to be expected that its regional military power will eventually surpass ours and may have done so already”.


2017-04-01 on breitbartproduction

Who are we kidding? China’s economy is 30% bigger than ours and growing 300% faster. Defensively they can shut down anything in the West Pacific when they want and if you haven’t been staying abreast of their defensive weaponry you’ve been missing out on the most interesting weapons development program in world history. And, as usual, the fastest.

They’re back in the position they’ve occupied for 2,000 years and ranting about it won’t change anything. All their neighbors are OK with it. Yes, they’d all like to be top dogs, too, but they’ve been getting along with the Big Dragon for millennia and they know exactly what to do: talk tough in public to extract better terms in private. And go along..


2017-04-01 on lowyinterpreter

Thought-provoking stuff. With an economy 30% bigger than America’s and growing three times faster, it’s hardly surprising that Chinese talent is returning to China, but the assertion, “Beijing’s trend towards being ‘more repressive at home and more assertive abroad’, including a renewed push for the ideological loyalty of its citizens” deserves a little more explanation.
The Chinese certainly aren’t feeling ‘oppressed’ (93% of them support current policies) and it’s their feelings that matter, after all. And as to ideological loyalty, the ‘ideology’ is one that 99% of Americans could be loyal to: peaceful transition to a xiaokang society in 2020, then onwards to a datong society. That’s been the goal since Confucius set it 2,500 years ago, Sun Yat Sen and Mao reaffirmed it, as did Deng and every other Chinese leader including Xi. What’s not to like about an ideology that produces an equitable, harmonious, prosperous society and leaves no-one behind?


2017-03-30 on thehill-v4

“For about the past 18 months, many people have worried about a Chinese economic crash.”
Many people have faux-worried about a Chinese economic crash for much longer than 18 months. Their ‘worries’ have been–and continue to be–groundless:

1990. The Economist. China’s economy has come to a halt.

1996. The Economist. China’s economy will face a hard landing

1998. The Economist: China’s economy entering a dangerous period of sluggish growth.

1999. Bank of Canada: Likelihood of a hard landing for the Chinese economy.

2000. Chicago Tribune: China currency move nails hard landing risk coffin.

2001. Wilbanks, Smith & Thomas: A hard landing in China.

2002. Westchester University: China Anxiously Seeks a Soft Economic Landing

2003. KWR International: How to find a soft landing if China..

2004. The Economist: The great fall of China?

2005. Nouriel Roubini: The Risk of a Hard Landing in China

2006. International Economy: Can China Achieve a Soft Landing?

2007. TIME: Is China’s Economy Overheating? Can China avoid a hard landing?

2008. Forbes: Hard Landing In China?

2009. Fortune: China’s hard landing. China must find a way to recover.

2010: Nouriel Roubini: Hard landing coming in China.

2011: Business Insider: A Chinese Hard Landing May Be Closer Than You Think

2012: American Interest: Dismal Economic News from China: A Hard Landing

2013: Zero Hedge: A Hard Landing In China

2014. CNBC: A hard landing in China.

2015. Forbes: Congratulations, You Got Yourself A Chinese Hard Landing ….

2016. The Economist: Hard landing looms for China


2017-03-29 on themonthly

Chinese media are no more ‘mouthpieces’ than ours. Indeed, they are far more accurate and trustworthy than ours, as Edelman’s 2016 Report, shows. 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government. https://www.slideshare.net/…

And speaking of accuracy and trustworthiness, nobody was killed or injured in or after the Tiananmen Square demonstrations, as several sources, from The Columbia Journalism Review to the US State Department reported. The Columbia Journalism Review critiques coverage of Tiananmen:
http://www.cjr.org/behind_t…

US State Department’s cables at the time:
http://www.alternativeinsig….

Britain’s Daily Telegraph: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/…

The Massacre that Wasn’t: http://www.globalresearch.c…


2017-03-26 on foreignpolicyjournal

The Pol Pot the Cambodians remember was not a tyrant, but a great patriot and nationalist, a lover of native culture and native way of life. He was brought up in royal palace circles; his aunt was a concubine of the previous king. He studied in Paris, but instead of making money and a career, he returned home, and spent a few years dwelling with forest tribes to learn from the peasants. He felt compassion for the ordinary village people who were ripped off on a daily basis by the city folk, the comprador parasites. He built an army to defend the countryside from these power-wielding robbers. Pol Pot, a monkish man of simple needs, did not seek wealth, fame or power for himself. He had one great ambition: to terminate the failing colonial capitalism in Cambodia, return to village tradition, and from there, to build a new country from scratch.

His vision was very different from the Soviet one. The Soviets built their industry by bleeding the peasantry; Pol Pot wanted to rebuild the village first, and only afterwards build industry to meet the villagers’ needs. He held city dwellers in contempt; they did nothing useful, in his view. Many of them were connected with loan sharks, a distinct feature of post-colonial Cambodia; others assisted the foreign companies in robbing people off their wealth. Being a strong nationalist, Pol Pot was suspicious of the Vietnamese and Chinese minorities. But what he hated most was acquisitiveness, greed, the desire to own things. St Francis and Leo Tolstoy would have understood him.

The Cambodians I spoke to pooh-poohed the dreadful stories of Communist Holocaust as a western invention. They reminded me of what went on: their brief history of troubles began in 1970, when the Americans chased away their legitimate ruler, Prince Sihanouk, and replaced him with their proxy military dictator Lon Nol. Lon Nol’s middle name was Corruption, and his followers stole everything they could, transferred their ill-gotten gains abroad then moved to the US. On top of this came US bombing raids. The peasants ran to the forest guerrillas of Khmer Rouge, which was led by a few Sorbonne graduates, and eventually succeeded in kicking out Lon Nol and his American supporters.

In 1975, Pol Pot took over the country, devastated by a US bombing campaign of Dresden ferocity, and saved it, they say. Indeed, the US planes (do you remember Ride of the Valkyries in the Apocalypse is Now?) dropped more bombs on this poor country than they had on the Nazi Germany, and spread their mines all over the rest of it. If the Cambodians are pressed to name their great destroyer (and they are not keen about burrowing back into the past), it is.. Read more…http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/0…


2017-03-23 on infoproc

BGI’s project is very large, their sample size is the biggest (Google staff, inter alia, contributed) and well-funded and has been running since 2012. Good to see some early results. Like most readers, I would appreciate a translation of Steve Chu’s report!



2017-03-19 on evonomics

Is there an existing hypothetical study of a real economy like, say, Iceland’s?
It would be helpful to see pre- and post UBI flows.


2017-03-18 on wsws

Meanwhile, school principals in the world’s best school district, Shanghai, get private limos and classroom teachers are limited to 15 hours per week of classroom instruction.


2017-03-18 on bloombergview

China’s “large and growing pile of debt” is just another western media news hook.

China has negligible foreign debt and most of its domestic ‘debt’ is between government departments. Its corporate debt is offset by corporate liquid assets and its negligible consumer debt is less than 20% of consumer savings.

In real life, the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) gives the following ratios for debt to GDP:
Japan: 393 %
USA: 239 %
China: 235%
http://www.bis.org/publ/qtr…

The World Bank gives the following ratios for Debt to GDP:
Japan: 390% at 0% growth
USA: 290% at 2% growth
China: 235% at 6.5% growth
Chart http://www.inpraiseofchina…. .


2017-03-16 on bloombergview

Nonsense. The Bank for International Settlements (BIS) gives the following ratios for debt to GDP:
Japan: 393 %
USA: 239 %
China: 235%
http://www.bis.org/publ/qtr…

The World Bank gives the following ratios for Debt to GDP:
Japan: 390% at 0% growth
USA: 290% at 2% growth
China: 235% at 6.5% growth
Chart http://www.inpraiseofchina…. .


2017-03-15 on southfront

State Dept Chief of Spatial and Boundary Analysis, Daniel Dzurek recounting how Japan returned the South China Sea to China after WWII in treaties that adhered to Japan’s surrender agreement: “Because the Allies, in particular the United Kingdom and the United States, could not agree on which government represented China, no Chinese delegation participated in the 1951 San Francisco Peace Conference. Therefore the Republic of China (Taiwan) negotiated a separate peace treaty with Japan, signed on 28 April 1952. Article 2 of the text included a reference to the San Francisco treaty:

“It is recognized that under Article 2 of the Treaty of Peace with Japan signed in the city of San Francisco in the United States of American on September 8 1951, Japan has renounced all right, title and claim to Taiwan (Formosa) and Penghu (the Pescadores) as well as the Spratly Islands and Paracel Islands””

Republic of China has argued that the explicit reference to the Spratly and Paracel islands in the text of this bilateral treaty implies Japanese recognition of Chinese sovereignty. Samuels and Lu have observed that, unlike the 1951 treaty, the Sino-Japanese text mentions the Spratly and Paracel islands in the same sentence as Taiwan and the Pescadores islands. The latter are generally recognized as Chinese territories. Moreover, according to the negotiating record Japan insisted that the renunciation article deal only with Chinese territory. This shows that the ROC and Japan viewed the islands of Taiwan, the Pescadores, the Spratlys, and tha Paracels as having a similar status – that is, belonging to China”. https://books.google.co.th/…


2017-03-13 on visualcapitalist

It’s about parity. If you want to compare apples and oranges.

China doesn’t use $ for any of its domestic activities and for a decreasing proportion of its imports and exports. It doesn’t, for example, buy destroyers for $ but only if you use PPP can you discover that, for every two billion dollar Arleigh Burke destroyer the US can afford, China can afford three. It’s just more useful.


2017-03-13 on visualcapitalist

That’s one of the silliest graphics in this space. It shows economies expressed in nominal (‘in name only’) dollars. Serious people use PPP, including the CIA WORLD FACTBOOK: 2016 GDP

1 China $21,270
2 European Union $19,180
3 United States $18,560

https://www.cia.gov/library…


2017-03-12 on visualcapitalist

If we wish to represent China’s GDP similarly, it would encompass the USA, Canada and Mexico. Combined.


2017-03-08 on nationalinterest

Fair enough. Except for WWI and WWII, in both of which cases the US faced already-defeated foes.


2017-03-08 on nationalinterest

Name one. (Grenada doesn’t count).


2017-03-05 on dezeenhq

Where’s the ‘ski in, ski out’ part? They look like run-of-the-mill houses in snow country.


2017-03-02 on nationalinterest

“none of these emperors outdid Mao Zedong who starved to death 70 million Chinese and had a fetish for nuclear war.”
Mao didn’t starve anyone to death. That’s just another ‘Putin is a Thug’ Western meme. Here’s U. Vt. History Professor Donping Han, who grew up in a small village during the Mao era: “This past summer (2014), I was invited by Xu Junshan, Professor of Zhongshan University and Vice President of Guangdong University, to give a talk at Zhongshan University on Chinaʼs agricultural development. While there, Professor Xu took me to see the two big reservoirs built during the Great Leap Forward in Guangdong Province: Xin Fengjiang Reservoir and Fengshubai Reservoir. Xinfengjiang Reservoir was nationally famous at the time it was built. I had read about it before, but seeing it in person this summer nevertheless had a profound impact on me. The reservoir has a 14 billion cubic meter capacity, an average of ten cubic meters of clean water for each Chinese citizen today. It has generated billions of kilowatts of electricity, helping power Chinaʼs rural and urban development. It has been an important asset in flood control and irrigation for the region. Today, it is one of the most important water sources for Guangdong Province and Hong Kong. In the reservoirʼs museum, I wept in front of the pictures of peasants working with hand tools at night on the projects. They touched me because they reminded me of my own participation in the building of the biggest irrigation project in my own village during the Cultural Revolution. I was in middle school in 1970. But when we heard that our villageʼs irrigation project was reaching a critical stage in construction, my classmates, teachers, and I all went there to volunteer at night. We worked with the peasants until past midnight. Local government officials, school teachers, and soldiers all came to volunteer. It was the social climate of the time under the Communist government. After my recent visit to Guangdong, I was asked to say a few words in front of a TV camera. I said that the Mao Era was an era of construction, laying the foundation for Chinaʼs future take-off. The peasants and workers of the Mao era, our predecessors, were born to unprecedented hardship and made tremendous sacrifices for Chinaʼs rise today. They were the heroes of China and they should be remembered as such by the young people of today. Tears almost came to my eyes when I spoke because there were so many in China who were actually accusing Chairman Mao and his generation of leaders of undermining Chinese development because of the Great Leap Forward. They have been effectively brainwashed by the rumours spread by Chinaʼs enemies. The Great Leap Forward also laid the foundation for Chinaʼs industrialization. During the three years of the Great Leap Forward, China made great strides in the output of steel, coal, machine tools and electricity. The increase of output over these three years accounted for 36.2 per cent of Chinaʼs total coal production, 29.6 per cent of Chinaʼs cloth production, and 25.9 per cent of Chinaʼs electricity generation between 1949 and 1979. Of the industrial projects the Chinese government launched between 1949 and 1964, two-thirds were started during the Great Leap Forward. During the second five-year-plan, which included the three years of the Great Leap Forward, China invested 120,090 million yuan and completed 581 big and medium industrial projects. Fixed national industrial assets increased by 861,820 million yuan. Without the hard work of the Great Leap Forward, it would be hard to imagine that China would be able to take off in the automobile, boat, transportation, and national defence industries. That China would develop nuclear bombs and satellites would be questionable. The Great Leap Forward grain shortages Post-Mao Chinese scholars, together with their foreign counterparts, try to paint a very dark picture of the Great Leap Forward. They claim that the Great Leap Forward created an unprecedented famine in China. They circulate rumours that 36 or more millions of people starved to death. In 1958, 1959 and 1960, the Americans, the Russians, the British, the Jiang Jieshi regime in Taiwan, the Japanese, and South Koreans were all hostile to China, had spies in China, and listening devices around China to monitor what was going on. But they did not have any evidence to show there was a famine in China at that time. The post-Mao struggle between the representatives of opposing lines in the Communist Party ended in an anti-Mao faction coming to power. This anti-Mao faction began a political campaign to tarnish the Mao era in order to legitimize their political return and to introduce a different political platform, opposed to that of Chairman Maoʼs. They started changing population statistics, and began to focus on the shortcomings of the Great Leap Forward. For many years, they only allowed one sided anti- Mao materials to be published. They used questionable methods to project the population changes in China during the Great Leap Forward, and eventually claimed dozens of millions of Chinese people perished during that period. A Chinese mathematics professor, Sun Jingxian, and an Indian economist, Utsa Patnaik, have refuted these claims and denounced them as an ideologically motivated attack on socialism. I will not repeat their argument here. Rather, I shall present some of my own field research, which will provide a case study of experiences of people in the Great Leap Forward and corroborate some of these findings. I grew up during the Great Leap Forward, and I have done rural research in China during the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. In 1958, the year when the commune was formed, we had the greatest summer and fall harvests in recorded history. People ate so well. That was true not only in my hometown in Shandong Province, but also in Henan and Anhui Provinces, where I studied. Peasants in Henan and Anhui told me that they were able to eat very well, better than ever before, in 1958. This indicates that the forming of the peopleʼs communes and the Great Leap Forward only improved peopleʼs livelihoods in 1958. In 1959, my hometown suffered a summer flood without precedent in the last hundred years. I still remember that my mother and my aunt took me to the fields in those days. After several days of rain, the ditches beside the roads were filled with water. All of our fields were water-logged. My mother pulled out some of the sweet potato plants which were planted about a month earlier, and saw no growth. I heard my mother tell my aunts that we were going to have a hard time that year. In the spring of 1960, my hometown had a very bad drought. On top of that, we had another very bad summer flood. The crops failed again. Quite a few people in my village migrated to the Northeast with their families, and quite a few young people left the village to look for opportunities elsewhere. Thus our region was hit very badly by natural disasters for two consecutive years. The Shandong Provincial Government, as well as the Central Government sent teams of investigators to our county to find out what was happening with the local leadership. The County Party Secretary Xu Hua and the Head of County Government Office Wang Changsheng were both dismissed by the upper government because of the grain shortage in the county. But during the two years of natural disasters, we got relief grains from the Central government, the provincial government, Qingdao City, Shanghai City and many other regions. I still remember the two dried wild vegetables shipped to us from Yunan Province: one with golden hair which we called ginmaogou (golden-haired dog), because it was shaped like a tiny dog, and another which was brown and shaped like a pig liver, called yezhugan (wild pig liver) by the local people. For many years, my parents kept a piece of each of these wild vegetables as souvenirs of the two hardship years, and also to remember the help we got from other people in China. People in Baoding Prefecture, Hebei Province, published a collection of memoirs titled During the Difficult Days, whichdescribes how, amid the severe grain shortages, people worked together helping each other, and how the local government leaders shared the hardship of the common people. When I read the book, I was reminded that the reason very few people starved amid the natural disasters of the Great Leap Forward was because of the spirit of socialism. Whenever and wherever one place had difficulties, people from other places helped. I remember many peasants told me that if it were not for the help of the Peopleʼs Government, many people would have starved amid disasters like the one in 1960. By contrast, in Northern Henan Province (where the grain shortage during the Great Leap Forward was supposed to have been severe), five million people had starved to death in 1942. The Government at that time had done nothing to help the local people. In the 1990s, I accompanied Ralph Thaxton, my advisor in graduate school, to study (on a Guggenheim scholarship) the regionʼs famine. When he said that he had come to study the famine, peasants thought that he was studying the famine of 1942-3. During that 1942-43 famine, not only did five million people starve, but many people had to sell their land, their houses, and their children, before fleeing their hometowns. The local government and national government did nothing to help the people there. But nothing like that took place during the grain shortage of the Great Leap Forward. Amid the grain shortages, my maternal grandfather died of a disease. My paternal grandfather also died that year at the same age. They were both in their sixties. (Chinese peopleʼs life expectancy was less than 60 years then.) They had been sick for a long time. The grain shortage might have weakened them, and they may have eventually succumbed to disease. But I think there is a significant difference between that and saying that they starved to death. Only people with ulterior motives would blame principally the Great Leap Forward, or the public dining halls, or the peopleʼs communes, for the grain shortage we faced during these three years amid severe natural disasters. The grain shortage was caused first and foremost by natural disasters”.


2017-03-01 on sciencenow

The IP ‘report’ you cite contains little more than unsubstantiated allegations by a pair of prominent buffoonish enemies of China, Jon Huntsman Jr. (Former U.S. Ambassador to China, Jon Huntsman, in a televised Republican primary debate told Americans he would reach out to the 500 million Chinese Internet users; to lead them towards change which would ultimately “take China down.”) and the guy who couldn’t shoot straight, Denis Blair (“Dennis C. Blair will resign Friday as the nation’s intelligence director after a tenure marred by the recent failures of U.S. spy agencies to detect terrorist plots and by political missteps…”. Washington Post). Both are inveterate self-promoters and neither has serious credibility in any field.

As to their allegations, the public record shows them to be baseless. Despite the huge numbers they invent, there have been precisely five successful prosecutions of Chinese for IP theft and the judgements and sentences the perpetrators were trivial, suggesting that the crimes themselves were minor.

Meanwhile, China is ahead of the USA in all fields of Civil Engineering, Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-Flight Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Sustainable Energy, Radiotelescopy, All fields of Sustainable Energy Research and Manufacturing, Hypersonic Space Weapons and Satellite Quantum Communications.

Just how likely is ‘China’ to steal anything from the US?


2017-02-28 on neweconomicthinking

“though the US exports less to China than vice versa”?

Nominally, perhaps, but in real life, trade between the two is roughly in balance, perhaps even favoring the USA.

Exports make up 18% of Chinese GDP. China’s exports to the US make up 18% of her total exports and the retained value of those exports is about 18%.

The retained value is low because most Chinese exports are, in reality, re-exports containing a high percentage of American I.P. China retains less than 9% of the value of an exported iPhone, for example. Though the WTO records the nominal, wholesale, export value of an iPhone as $400, China’s retained share is about $30.

The retained value of American exports to China, on the other hand, is 100% of nominal value because the U.S. owns 100% of their I.P. – from genetically modified seeds to CPUs and genome analyzers.

So the two trading partners are more like partners than rivals.


2017-02-28 on theasanforum

“Two barriers to Sino-Russian trust had been military cooperation—as arms sales had slumped over copying of Russian weapons leading to reduced Russian exports and even competition in export markets—and overlapping spheres of influence in Central Asia, as Russia blocked moves in the SCO that would have strengthened the position of China there.” Really?

Arms sales had slumped over copying of Russian weapons? Hardly. Arms sales slumped because China spent billions developing weapons indigenously, including systems far in advance of anything Russia makes. Along the way, China reimbursed Russia annually for IP usage but Russian arms manufacturers didn’t get the proceeds (which were retained by the State) and complained that they were being ‘ripped off by China’.

And how, precisely, did Russia block moves in the SCO that would have strengthened the position of China? That would be newsworthy if there were any truth in it.


2017-02-25 on wsws

Very like the DPRK ‘torpedo attack’ on the ROK patrol ship: totally bogus, with bogus, secret inquiry and conclusion.


2017-02-24 on visualcapitalist

The chart is deliberately misleading. Its use of nominal (“in name only”) GDP completely distorts the balance of economic power.


2017-02-24 on nationalinterest

Can you provide us with links to details of 3 islands, over which there is legitimate dispute, which China has massively fortified?

Gracias.


2017-02-23 on nationalinterest

“Ministers expressed unanimous grave concern over the “unsettling” militarization of features in the sea, but fell short of blaming China.”
Perhaps because China has the fewest militarized features in the South China Sea: check them out and you’ll see that this hoo-ha is entirely concocted by the USA.


2017-02-23 on newsecuritybeat

Excellent vignette! Many thanks. Follow ups welcome!


2017-02-23 on russiainsider

I believe her father was a Protestant minister. Catholic priests are celibate and do not marry.


2017-02-20 on nationalinterest

“The US could use the South China Sea case to demonstrate its commitment to a stable, rules-based international maritime order. This means honoring the Permanent Court of Arbitration’s 2016 ruling and not recognizing Chinese-imposed restrictions on navigation in the sea…The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) is perhaps the fairest international law of all.”

What a load of codswallop! Not only is the US not a signatory to UNCLOS, ‘the fairest international law of all,’ but the 2016 hearing was not before a court and its findings are not law. It was a temporary, hired panel selected by the Japanese puppets and paid for by the USA. Its findings are called ‘awards’ and have no force in this case, since China, like Australia and the UK, had reserved matters of sovereignty–which means that the panels vastly overstepped what little authority it possessed.


2017-02-20 on themonthly

“ICOS), proposed a pilot scheme for licensed opium-growing in Afghanistan with a view to pharmaceutical production. It received some support from Europe and Canada, and from some Western military officers trying to win over hearts and minds among rural Afghans, but soon ran up against opposition from US government officials warning of diversion to illicit markets.”

My God, what cruel cynicism. Over 200 billion oxy-x pills were diverted to illicit markets in the USA in 2016.


2017-02-20 on whowhatwhy

Afterwards, someone asked Nixon why he didn’t fight it and reveal what he knew. “I didn’t want to go out like Jack,” he replied.


2017-02-18 on nationalinterest

Mostly because of lack of space and time. Briefly, the PLAN can put more boats in its own waters, the West Pacific, than the USN. Because logistics.
The PLAN boats are platforms for Chinese missiles that are better and more numerous that the USN can field there.
That’s enough for a stalemate above and below the surface: the USN, like every fighting force, will not enter a battle–particularly and offensive one–knowing in advance that it has no advantage.
That leaves missiles, and the PLA has overwhelming superiority in missiles in the West Pacific (and, arguably, with the DF-ZF, globally). So, naval battles in the West Pacific are obsolete within 2,000 miles of China’s shore.


2017-02-18 on nationalinterest

I admire your persistence and hereby award you the Order of the Black Knight. https://youtu.be/zKhEw7nD9C4


2017-02-18 on nationalinterest

Dear me. What shall we do with you, I wonder? Perhaps a spot in President Trump’s cabinet?

The Bomb Didn’t Beat Japan … Stalin Did | Foreign Policy

foreignpolicy.com/2013/05/3…

May 30, 2013 – Anami Korechika, minster of war, even went to consult with the head of the …. If Japan’s leaders were going to surrender because of Hiroshima and …. When the Russians invaded Manchuria, they sliced through what had …


2017-02-18 on nationalinterest

You’ve watched the John Wayne version of WWII. In the real version, the US never faced an undefeated enemy, and since then has never won a war. It is, to quote a prominent 20th. century statesman, a paper tiger.


2017-02-18 on nationalinterest

In the entire US Pacific campaign it never faced Japanese forces equal to either of the armies that Russia defeated. Indeed, it rarely faced any forces at all. In its Pacific Theater activities US forces mostly stood off and shelled or bombed small Japanese holding forces.


2017-02-18 on theatlanticcities

“all those empty promises were creating a housing bubble on the brink of bursting.”
Except that it didn’t burst, of course. Chinese real estate prices have either remained steady or risen since
And except that there are no ‘Chinese Ghost Cities’. That’s another Western media myth.


2017-02-17 on zmescience

Perhaps I should have used ‘American individuals’ and ‘Chinese individuals’.


2017-02-15 on zmescience

China signed the Kyoto Accords on 29 May 1998, ratified them the following year, and has met all of its obligations under the Accords.
The USA still refuses to sign the Accords.
Why are you engaging in this discussion? I don’t get it. Surely there’s a football game or boxing match where your partisan ignorance would be welcome and useful.


2017-02-15 on southfront

I call bullshit on this piece of misrepresentation. Even to explain Dr. Bates complaints requires a professional climatologist or, at minimum, data scientist. Not only is the writer unqualified for this task, he is biased and partisan.


2017-02-15 on nationalinterest

Nonsense. Japan surrendered because Russia entered the war and annihilated the Kwangtung Army in a classic double envelopment. Russia had annihilated its Sixth Army in 1939 (causing Japan to sue for peace), so the Japanese chose the soft option and capitulated to the US in order to preserve its right wing elite–which rules Japan to this day.
The US campaign in the Pacific was a sideshow.


2017-02-15 on hooverinstitution

“Xi Jinping has a strong interest in sustaining three narratives: the Chinese economy is growing stably, economic reform is moving forward, and a rising China is playing a more important role on the global scene. Xi has a good chance of sustaining all three of these narratives to his domestic audience”.

Why does the phrasing suggest that China’s stable growth, economic reform and global role are mere ‘narratives’ that can only be sustained before a domestic audience?

China’s stable growth, economic reform and global role are well-established facts and the results of long trends.

Why not simply say so?


2017-02-15 on zmescience

“the nation that created the largest mass murdered of ALL TIME? That would be Chairman Mao. He killed his OWN PEOPLE. Yet his face is still on their money…”

Kidding right? Mao was no George Bush. Mao didn’t kill anyone. By the time Mao took charge in 1949, the Chinese people’s rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness had been lost. Chinese life expectancy was 35 years, 80 percent could not write their own names, electricity was available in a few cities, millions of bandits roamed the countryside, drug addiction paralyzed entire towns, 13-year old girls were sold as concubines for $100 and U.S. Ambassador John Leighton Stuart, reported that, in 1946 alone, 10 million starved to death in just three provinces.

When Mao stepped down twenty years later–having served his entire tenure under a Western economic embargo–the invaders and warlords were gone, life expectancy was 67, the population had doubled, literacy was 84 percent, electricity reached even poor areas, the economy had grown 500 percent, drug addiction was eliminated, women were liberated and educated and basic human rights and China’s infrastructure were fully restored. There is no doubt that CCP did a lot of things wrong along the way. Most of the “founding fathers” of CCP were illiterate country bumpkins to begin with. Nonetheless the China after 1949 is a very different place than before and much more progressive. In some of the key areas such as literacy, women’s rights, and economic development, it’s been like night-and-day. Nowadays it’s fashionable to criticize CCP and its politics. Back in 1930 nobody criticized the Chinese government when it happily gave away the richest Chinese cities to foreign occupation and gladly hang the signs of “Chinese and dogs not allowed” out on the fence. One can argue that the CCP was not democratically elected. Back in 1945, 400 million Chinese voted with their lives to join a party of country bumpkins with no name recognition, no money, no successful track record, no governing experience, no significant foreign backing, a quarter of the military strength of its opponent, vastly out-numbered and out-equipped, well, that has got to mean something.

Mao’s economy beat India’s economy by 200%, though India’s was far richer and suffered neither war nor a Western boycott. Here’s China’s GDP growth under Mao. 600% growth despite the international boycott. It beats every other developing country and every other national leader on earth in its balance of speed and equitability:

1979 410.05

1978 367.87

1977 325.00

1976 298.86

1975 303.95

1974 282.77

1973 275.62

1972 255.24

1971 245.69

1970 227.97

1969 196.22

1968 174.41

1967 179.42

1966 188.87

1965 173.4

1964 146.99

1963 124.83

1962 116.22

1961 123.23

1960 147.01

1959 144.75

1958 131.23

1957 107.14

1956 103.07

1955 91.16

1954 85.98

1953 82.44

1952 67.91

In his book, A Curtain of Ignorance, author Felix Greene (Grahams’ cousin) tells of traveling through China in 1960 and, though rationing was tight, he saw no starvation: “In May 1962 an unusually large number of Chinese refugees flocked to Hong Kong…official British government statements attest to the fact that the refugees were not suffering from malnutrition, nor did any of them seek political asylum or claim that they were fleeing Communism as such. Food shortages and the general discomfort of life in this period were undoubtedly some of the causes for this exodus, but not starvation”. In The Times, April 18, 1962, he wrote, ‘With the establishment of the new government in Peking in 1949, two things happened. First, starvation–death by hunger–ceased in China. Food shortages, and severe ones, there have been; but no starvation.

After Congress established the boycott and embargo, the CIA was assigned to report to Congress on its success in causing mass starvation. At the height of the droughts and floods the Agency reported:

4 April 1961: The Chinese Communist regime is now facing the most serious economic difficulties it has confronted since it consolidated its power over mainland China. As a result of economic mismanagement, and, especially, of two years of unfavorable weather, food production in 1960 was little if any larger than in 1957 at which time there were about 50 million fewer Chinese to feed. Widespread famine does not appear to be at hand, but in some provinces many people are now on a bare subsistence diet and the bitterest suffering lies imcriticstely ahead in the period before the June harvests. The dislocations caused by the ‘Leap Forward’ and the removal of Soviet technicians have disrupted China’s industrialization program. These difficulties have sharply reduced the rate of economic growth during 1960 and have created a serious balance of payments problem. Public morale, especially in rural areas, is almost certainly at its lowest point since the Communists assumed power, and there have been some instances of open dissidence.

2 May 1962: The future course of events in Communist China will be shaped largely by three highly unpredictable variables: the wisdom and realism of the leadership, the level of agricultural output, and the nature and extent of foreign economic relations. During the past few years all three variables have worked against China. In 1958 the leadership adopted a series of ill-conceived and extremist economic and social programs; in 1959 there occurred the first of three years of bad crop weather; and in 1960 Soviet economic and technical cooperation was largely suspended. The combination of these three factors has brought economic chaos to the country. Malnutrition is widespread, foreign trade is down, and industrial production and development have dropped sharply. No quick recovery from the regime’s economic troubles is in sight”.

Wake up. Turn off Fox News. Learn something.


2017-02-15 on zmescience

Eurasia has lots of them, too. So does the Southern Hemisphere, and Africa. Ultimately, it comes down to individual responsibility and Chinese individuals are more responsible than American individuals.


2017-02-15 on zmescience

Each Chinese emits, on average, 7.6 tons of CO2 annually. Each American emits 16.5 tons per year. It’s that simple.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wi…


2017-02-15 on nationalinterest

I use ‘Fox News’ as shorthand for all Western mainstream media; they all publish the same nonsense, but Fox is just more mendacious and strident than the rest. Your claims about China come from Western mainstream media, so let’s take a closer look at them:

1. ‘China’s inherent mass neurosis with appearances is dangerous and destabilizing’. For a great power, China’s concern with appearances seems almost non-existent. For example: Bloomberg’s article, headlined ‘Rich-Poor Gap Widens to Most Since 1967 as Income Falls’ noted that America’s GINI Coefficient (the measure of inequality, where lower is better) was 0.463 but offered no solutions. The People’s Daily simultaneously reported China’s (slightly better) GINI of 0.438 under the headline, ‘New GINI Figures Show Instability Risks, Need for Reform,’ adding, “In some developed countries such as the U.S., whose GINI index sometimes reaches 0.4, disparities in income distribution are eased, step by step, through increasing taxation on the wealthy and improving the welfare system to help the poor. China should learn from America’s experience.”

2. “Their RE market alone is in precarious condition with rampant overbuilding”. China’s private RE market will celebrate its 16th. birthday in March this year so we can expect at least another decade of growth as trillions of RMB savings are pulled out of 2% bank accounts and invested in property. The non-stop improvement in infrastructure (when cities’ populations hit 3 million they get beautiful new subways) increases RE values constantly. Infrastructure adds exogenous value. And don’t forget that real wages have doubled every 10 years since 1980 and are on track to repeat by 2020, so exuberance is to be expected, but it’s hardly irrational. A further protection against an American-style RE crash is that 80% of Chinese homes are mortgage-free and new home buyers typically make deposits in excess of 40%.

3. “entire cities empty”. China’s urbanization requires it to build cities for another 200,000,000 people. That’s 200 cities the size of Austin, TX. The canny Chinese won’t move into them until they’re finished, of course, which means not only must every toilet flush, but roads and sewers work, buses run, factories offer jobs…. Happily for us, there’s a guy who investigates these cities of the future, Wade Shepard, who has visited virtually every alleged ‘ghost town’ in China: “I’ve been chasing reports of deserted towns around China and have yet to find one. Over and over, I would read articles in the international press claiming that China is building towns that are never inhabited–only to find something very different upon arrival. The New South China Mall had a lot of empty shops but, by the time I arrived, it turned out to be a thriving entertainment center; Dantu showed me that an initially stagnant new town can become populated and come alive, and I found that Xinyang’s new district, a place called a ‘ghost town’ since 2010, hasn’t even been built yet”. [www.vagabondjourney.com/the…]. By 2025, according to McKinsey, almost one-third of the 75 most economically dynamic cities in the world–mostly insignificant, stagnant backwaters ten years ago–will be in China.

4. “Their labor costs are rising, and they are losing their “workshop to the world” status.” Yes, Chinese workers are only 4 percent cheaper than their American cousins. [https://www.bloomberg.com/n…]. But labor’s share of the cost of production is falling because individuals’ productivity–currently far below our workers’–is rising rapidly. That’s why the cost advantage of Chinese goods has remained steady for the past 15 years.

5. “They still have no social safety nets”. In real life, Chinese employees contribute a staggering 40 percent of their wages (three times the U.S. rate and four times the EU’s) to social security insurance (businesses contribute three fourths of that and employees the remainder) which the government invests in development that creates higher-value, better paying jobs. Contribution rates are high, too, because the legal retirement age is 55. Everyone contributes to unemployment insurance, medical insurance and to a tax exempt, employer matching, compulsory Housing Provident Fund to help low income earners own a home. Employers, not employees, also contribute to work-related injury and maternity insurance funds. Even the thrifty Chinese think this savings level is overkill and now, with funds brimming over and infrastructure approaching saturation, wealthier local governments are cutting contributions to programs like occupational injury (accidents are declining), unemployment (employment has stayed high) and childbirth insurance (births have stayed low).

6. “Many Chinese “engineers” are unqualified to work for western firms due to inadequate education.” No doubt there are some duds amongst its 250,000 new engineers each year but, given that all of them commence their B.Eng. studies three years ahead of their American counterparts in math and science, not many. The evidence for this is pretty plain: China leads the world in Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communications, ASW Missiles, In-Flight Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Radiotelescopy, Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and all aspects of Sustainable Energy. How bad can they be?

7. “Their workforce is rapidly aging and elder care is a major problem while too few women exist for the number of men”. Their workforce is aging but their productivity is rising even faster: more than fast enough to support retirees. And, since they retire at 55, there’s plenty of room to raise the retirement age, and a national dialog about this is underway. The gender imbalance statistics were due to the under-reporting of female second children, it turns out, now that birth restrictions have been eased. The imbalance of single men is caused by single, highly educated Chinese girls refusing to marry losers (guys who don’t own homes, which 90% of Chinese couples do). For thousands of years, such men have been weeded out of the gene pool, which is why the Chinese have a much higher average IQ than we do. Elder care is far, far less a problem in China than in the USA, as you will seen by visiting any Chinese city, and steady reforms in pensions and social security will keep it that way.

8. “doctors are known to get attacked by angry patient relatives due to poor medical care”. Americans file 10,000 malpractice suits each year. Public lawsuits are new in China and sometimes grief-stricken or crazy people do crazy things, but do not despair. Chinese courts heard almost 20,000 medical malpractice cases last year and, since 2008, there’s been 81% increase in such suits. Chinese patients (and families) are increasingly aware that litigation may result in a more favorable outcomes all round. In a recently issued document (still in draft, but already published on the Internet), the Supreme People’s Court says it’s working on a body of medical malpractice law rules and better systems to resolve disputes involving the medical system.

9. “Look for capital outflows in the $1T range over the next decade.” Capital has been outflowing from the USA for decades mostly, like Chinese outflows, into productive investments abroad–like your own investment in Chinese high end real estate. China’s participation in foreign FDI is a welcome feature, not a bug.

10. “Wealthy Chinese want to leave”. There’s nothing stopping them, yet more billionaires have chosen to live in smoggy Beijing than in any city on earth.

Sounds like you should head for Beijing…


2017-02-14 on nationalinterest

Thanks for regurgitating every talking point Fox News has used for the past 30 years. They’re all completely wrong, as events have repeatedly proven.
Meanwhile, China has surpassed the USA in economic size and dynamism, critical technologies and government trust and support.
But, hey, if your mind is made up, why should I confuse you with facts?


2017-02-14 on nationalinterest

Bear in mind that the US has never won a war, even against civilians armed with pickups and AK knockoffs.
China is not Iraq. It has a professional military ( who are perfectly willing to take 10,000 casualties a week, if required), vast resources and a much bigger, more productive economy.
Its defensive weapon suite is far in advance of anything we’ve ever faced or even contemplated. I suggest you read some USNI reports before jumping to conclusions


2017-02-13 on nationalinterest

AA doesn’t have to be 100% effective to prevent attacks. 50% is more than sufficient. Ask any air commander.

Given their range, the S-400 missiles don’t have to be on a single island. China has abundant A2A missiles and platforms from which to launch them, including their fancy new PL-15, designed to destroy the AWACs aircraft that hover behind battle lines directing missiles and aircraft to their targets. Propelled by a dual pulse rocket motor, the PL-15 flies 200 miles in a semi-ballistic trajectory using an advanced guidance system linked to long-range radar and satellites. It is currently is the only type in this class. Gen. Herbert Carlisle, head of USAF Air Combat Command, twice mentioned it in 2016, “Look at the PL-15 and the range of that weapon. How do we counter that?”.

China’s attacks on the US mainland would be carried out by its DF-50, the most advanced ICBM on earth, each capable of taking out 10 cities. As a backup, it could employ its DF-ZF, against which the US has no defense.

China would be fighting a defensive war on its own turf at short range and, with a much bigger economy and vastly greater manufacturing capability, it could swamp the US. Fleets win battles, but economies win wars.


2017-02-13 on nationalinterest

“to the Achilles’ heel of China’s island garrisons: in the long run, they are impossible to defend….In any military confrontation with the United States, China’s at-sea outposts would almost certainly be quickly rolled back by waves of airstrikes and cruise missile attacks”

Rubbish. No U.S.ship could safely come within 2,000 miles and airstrikes on Chinese territory would run into China’s S-400 and domestic anti aircraft batteries and swiftly lead to missile and airstrikes on US territory.


2017-02-11 on nationalinterest

Not quite as easy as that. The bottom of the Straits is thick with Chinese passive sonar arrays (yes, even though the Chinese are only 11 times smarter than us they, too, are aware of their strategic value) and the Straits are within easy reach of China’s ship-killing missiles, both land- and submarine-based. Naval analysts are concerned about China’s new anti-ship cruise weapon, the YJ-12. According to the Naval War College Review, at 200 miles, the YJ-12 is the world’s longest-ranged anti-ship cruise missile and, when carried by China’s new J20 fighter with its 1000-mile operational radius, the YJ-12 has an effective range of 1,200 miles, far beyond carriers’ aircraft and missiles. In its final stage the YJ-12 accelerates to supersonic speed and delivers its 1,000 lb. warhead in a corkscrew trajectory, putting almost any vessel out of action. To extract further value from the YJ-12, the PLA equips their Song 039 submarines with them. Experts talk about the Song’s threat to U.S. carriers because it regularly avoids detection by carrier escorts: in 2006 an undetected Song surfaced within firing range of the Kitty Hawk battle group and, more recently, a Song successfully stalked the Reagan carrier group. Critics point out that if a relatively inferior sub like the Song can penetrate a carrier’s screen the more capable Kilo class would find it even easier. In addition to missiles, Chinese subs are armed with Type 65 wake-homing torpedoes that deliver 1,000 lb. warheads from 30 miles away at 60 mph. A Navy study concluded that, even against alerted surface warships, 32 percent of missiles score hits.

The Chinese economy is 30% bigger than America’s and growing 300% faster, and its manufacturing capacity is vastly more powerful and productive.

Fleets win (and lose) battles. Economies win wars.


2017-02-11 on theasanforum

“What have been the drivers of this trans-nationalization of Uyghur terrorism?”
Whisper it softly: American and American proxy money, equipment and training.


2017-02-11 on nationalinterest

Fleets and missiles win battles but economies win wars, and China’s economy is much bigger and growing 300% faster than the USA’s, and vastly more competent in manufacturing. This article, and the attitude underlying it, is delusional.


2017-02-09 on insidehighered

American schools are currently 44th. among the developed countries, China is #1. There is nothing that vouchers–or similar cosmetics–will do to improve that.


2017-02-09 on abcnewsdotcom

No proof, of course, just finger-pointing by notorious warmongers and sociopaths. The usual Western propagandistic, warmongering drivel.


2017-02-08 on zmescience

“they’re still the world’s largest polluter”.
China doesn’t pollute. Neither does the USA. People pollute.
American people pollute twice as much as Chinese people. Why not be honest about it?


2017-02-08 on nationalinterest

A successful blockade would be almost impossible without the loss of several capital ships when Chinese missiles can sink carriers 2,000 miles away and its nuclear subs (undetectable by the USN) at much greater ranges. I doubt that the US is willing to lose face to that degree, especially since retaliation would result in the immediate destruction of all its East Asian bases.

Also, a blockade would simultaneously send the smaller, weaker US economy into freefall, since trade between the two is in balance and the US’ share of Chinese exports is minor.


2017-02-08 on nationalinterest

Unless you’re expecting a re-run of the Battle of the Coral Sea, carriers are obsolete. China will build a few billion-dollar carriers solely to goad the US into completing the $20 billion Ford class fleet, which will get built because admirals love them. Otherwise they’re just floating targets and China has the most powerful defensive suite of any country, all purposed to keep the US out of the West Pacific.

And Taiwan is part of China.


2017-02-08 on nationalinterest

I trust you are not envisioning a replay of the Battle of the Coral Sea? Carriers are obsolete, unless you are an admiral, in which case they are ego-boosters, or wishing to attack civilian land targets (our military’s specialty).
China will build a few billion-dollar carriers to goad the US into spending its money on more $20 billion Ford class showboats, but the real action is in missiles, where China has a comfortable edge and which it will use to keep our carriers away or simply sink them.


2017-02-07 on nationalinterest

“a scheme ultimately dependent on American acquiescence”?
Maybe 20 years ago. In 2017 China can shut the US out of the West Pacific whenever it wishes.

Besides, State Dept Chief of Spatial and Boundary Analysis, Daniel Dzurek recounting how Japan returned the South China Sea to China after WWII in treaties that adhered to Japan’s surrender agreement says, “Because the Allies, in particular the United Kingdom and the United States, could not agree on which government represented China, no Chinese delegation participated in the 1951 San Francisco Peace Conference. Therefore the Republic of China (Taiwan) negotiated a separate peace treaty with Japan, signed on 28 April 1952. Article 2 of the text included a reference to the San Francisco treaty:

“It is recognized that under Article 2 of the Treaty of Peace with Japan signed in the city of San Francisco in the United States of American on September 8 1951, Japan has renounced all right, title and claim to Taiwan (Formosa) and Penghu (the Pescadores) as well as the Spratly Islands and Paracel Islands””

Republic of China has argued that the explicit reference to the Spratly and Paracel islands in the text of this bilateral treaty implies Japanese recognition of Chinese sovereignty. Samuels and Lu have observed that, unlike the 1951 treaty, the Sino-Japanese text mentions the Spratly and Paracel islands in the same sentence as Taiwan and the Pescadores islands. The latter are generally recognized as Chinese territories. Moreover, according to the negotiating record Japan insisted that the renunciation article deal only with Chinese territory. This shows that the ROC and Japan viewed the islands of Taiwan, the Pescadores, the Spratlys, and tha Paracels as having a similar status – that is, belonging to China”. https://books.google.co.th/…


2017-02-07 on nationalinterest

The Chinese are honest: we know who their oligarchy is and they are accountable to their people (who overwhelmingly trust and support their policies).
The American oligarchy, which funds all political candidates and writes all laws, is secretive and exploitive and unaccountable to their people (who overwhelmingly–80:20 distrust trust them and do not support their policies).


2017-02-07 on nationalinterest

The Capitalist party is the only one allowed to win in the USA.


2017-02-07 on nationalinterest

“unelected Chinese Communist Party”??
Who, precisely, elected Donald Trump?
Names, anyone?


2017-02-03 on themonthly

“Meanwhile, at home, American voters suffer from poor schools, decrepit infrastructure, dwindling opportunities and stagnant incomes.”
On the other side of the Pacific, Chinese citizens enjoy the best schools in the world, the best infrastructure on earth, rapidly expanding opportunities, and 100% wage rises every ten years– not to mention a defensive arsenal that can shut the U.S. out of the West Pacific whenever it chooses.
Though Hugh White’s commonsense observations are vastly more realistic than most, but he’s years behind China’s current developments.


2017-02-02 on themonthly

“It was also, declared Trump, “the worst call by far”.. That is saying something when one of his other phone calls was to none other than Vladimir Putin.”
Why would a call with Dr. Putin, one of the world’s few real statesmen, be unpleasant in any way? Are there any examples of Dr. Putin being impolite or overbearing to anyone, ever?


2017-01-31 on dezeenhq

Wikipedia: “(Li Xinggang) is well known for his Sino/foreign co-operation in two big projects up to the moment, in Xihuan Plaza and the Xizhimen Transportation Hub, as the chief designer, he presided engineering design and particular work. Co-operating with the French firm Arup, it was just the beginning which gave him a basis for the Master Project of 2008 Beijing Olympic Games – the design of “Bird’s Nest” Beijing National Stadium. The dialogued with Herzog & de Meuron and the “structural” steel skin determining whether this design was in line with social demand and acceptable in China.

The development of this “skin-space” concept together with Chinese gardens gave maturity to the Office, the design of Li Xinggang seems swinging between modernism and tradition, or the combination of both. We can see several applications such as Reconstruction of No. B-59-1, Wenchuan Earthquake Memorial, Fuxing Road, Xierqi Station and Beijing Subway Line 4 Stations o Hainan International Convention And Exhibition Center in Haikou.”


2017-01-30 on evonomics

No mention of China’s economists and its remarkably successful economy. Pity.


2017-01-29 on dezeenhq

“Herzog & de Meuron worked with Ai Weiwei to design Beijing National Stadium, built for the 2008 Olympic Games”??
Really?

Architect Li Xinggang’s model of the Bird’s Nest was adopted in April 2003, long before Ai attempted to join the design team in 2006. When his participation was refused, he publicly threatened to boycott the Games. His entire contribution was worse than a nuisance.


2017-01-26 on engineeringcom

Fleets win battles but economies win wars.
Not only is China’s economy much larger than America’s and growing several times faster, but its manufacturing prowess is unmatched. In 2015, the PLA Navy launched three Type-093G nuclear submarines and one Chinese shipyard simultaneously launched a Type 071 Landing Platform Dock amphibious warship, a Type 054A frigate and a Type 815G Electronic Intelligence ship. In 2016, the U.S. Navy visited Chinese shipyards to order a floating naval dock. This week, the PLAN launched another Type 52 and will launch on each month through May…


2017-01-20 on zmescience

Yes. The term is not applicable to either China or the USA. Both countries hold regular elections but their leaders are not chosen by their citizens.


2017-01-19 on bloombergview

None of my claims comes close to qualifying as a “lie”.

All current, verifiable, official evidence (not allegations) supports my contentions.

All international agencies–like the World Bank, the IMF, the WTO, the CIA, Pew, CSIS, Harvard, Edelman, the Government of China and the Fed–in two studies, the other on reliability of statistics–support every claim I’ve made.

In the case of the St. Louis Fed, by publishing the paper I cited, they gave it their nihil obstat. Nor has anyone contradicted their conclusions.

Indeed, attempts to contradict my claims about the size, success and soundness of China’s economy have repeatedly failed, and usually proven the opposite, as this study demonstrates: “A detailed analysis of China’s GDP indicates its economy is actually 15% larger than official figures”:
http://csis.org/files/publi….


2017-01-19 on bloombergview

No. ROI on China’s debt is very high, as the St.Louis Fed reported in “Is Government Spending a Free Lunch? Evidence from China”. Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. https://research.stlouisfed….

And the Bank for International Settlements (BIS. http://www.bis.org/publ/qtr… gives the following ratios for debt to GDP:
Japan: 393 %
USA: 239 %
China: 235%

Besides, China’s economy is growing three times faster than the rest, and growth eats debt.


2017-01-18 on bloombergview

Can anyone explain this extraordinary statement and, possibly, provide a source for it?:

“To achieve last year’s GDP growth target, Chinese debt had to grow by a gut-wrenching 40 percentage points of GDP”.

Thanks.


2017-01-14 on business-desk

Thank you, on behalf of sane people everywhere.


2017-01-14 on business-desk

“inefficient investment and an associated buildup of debt”??
Seriously?
Common sense suggests precisely the opposite–government investments are made by the smartest people in China who are, coincidentally, tight-fisted Chinese. Xi, for example, wore altered hand-me-down clothing from his elder sister. He grew up in the poorest village in China. He’s lived on a tiny salary all his life. Inefficient investment would be repulsive to him.
The St. Louis Fed investigated the question and their findings support the commonsense assumption: “Is Government Spending a Free Lunch? Evidence from China”. Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. https://research.stlouisfed…. If ever there was a time for China to load up on debt, it’s now.

Debt? It’s functionally negligible. 95% domestic, of which the majority is book entries between state and quasi-state entities. At Chart http://www.inpraiseofchina…., the World Bank gives the following ratios for Debt-to-GDP:
Japan: 390% at 0% growth
USA: 290% at 2% growth
China: 235% at 6.5% growth.


2017-01-13 on zmescience

Precisely. That’s how most leaders get to be leaders, by negotiation between the various party factions. That’s certainly true of the American process.
Public voting is, in most cases, incidental and changes nothing. I would go so far as to call it a fraud.


2017-01-12 on zmescience

Do you consider President-elect Trump ‘elected’?
If so, by whom?


2017-01-12 on zmescience

‘Providing the Communist Party with a system to handle society like this and then relying on its benevolence seems like a recipe for disaster.’
Relying on its government’s benevolence is precisely what the Chinese have always done and are doing today. The trick to making it work depends on their capacity to elect benevolent men to government.
That’s something they figured out long ago and do well today. It’s why Lee Kwan Yew called Xi Jinping “a Chinese Nelson Mandela”. It’s why, at 80%, the Chinese government is the most trusted on earth.
The West has not yet figured out how to elect non-sociopaths and we pay the price every day.


2016-12-28 on taxvox

Meanwhile, across the Pacific, technocrats readjusted China’s regional and national tax rates to ensure that the economy grows 300% faster than ours.
Is this discrepancy of no interest? Does nobody give a damn that their idea of ‘economy’ is better than ours? That it includes a higher percentage of the population than ours. It works better for a higher percentage of them (96%) than our model does for us.
They include poor people in their model and seek to reduce their number systematically–as a national priority and humanitarian obligation.
If we included poor people in our model and aimed to reduce their number, we would all be happier.
The Chinese figured this out 1,800 years ago and that’s why they’re doing what they’re doing.


2016-12-23 on bloombergview

Give it time. There’s plenty of scope for development. One reason behind China’s coproduction policy is to dramatize friendship and cooperation between two Great Powers. The policy’s intention is that the US and China coproduce positive, big-budget propaganda.

With enough imagination–there’s certainly no lack of money–it could work, and help us from blowing each others’ asses off while, of course, being highly entertaining…


2016-12-21 on thewirein

The Bank for International Settlements (BIS) gives the following ratios for debt to GDP:
Japan: 393 %
USA: 239 %
China: 235%
http://www.bis.org/publ/qtr…

The size of China’s total debt has consistently been driven by the size of its corporate borrowing and as McKinsey notes, specifically non-financial sector borrowing (ie the real economy). This is important because the reality is that a however much one thinks there is overcapacity, most of this debt is being used for investment, meaning that for the moment at least, although the liabilities side of the balance sheet is expanding, so is the assets side. In theory, assets have some chance of being sold to recoup debt. Net debt to GDP would actually be lower most comparables. The small proportion of household debt is notable since this is really the driven by consumption. Whilst we want to see increased consumption figures, the economy is not being hollowed out by “empty” consumer debt

Debt is a many-splendored thing. Debt has quality, for example. And term. And offsetting assets. And counterparties. Nominal and real yields. And more.

China’s debt is unusual in that all its counterparties are domestic and subject to the same, commonsense settlement authority, the government of China.

Its government debt is of extraordinarily high quality, as the Federal Reserve found: “Is Government Spending a Free Lunch? Evidence from China”. Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. https://research.stlouisfed…

Most corporate debt is offset by corporate liquid assets, for that matter.


2016-12-21 on technologyreview

Russians? Says who?


2016-12-19 on nationalinterest

I’m using standard military terms. You’re using political terminology: one man’s ‘liberation’ is another man’s subjugation.

Do you see any good result from America’s invasions of these countries since WWII:
China 1945-46
Korea 1950-53
China 1950-53
Guatemala 1954
Indonesia 1958
Cuba 1959-60
Guatemala 1960
Belgian Congo 1964
Guatemala 1964
Dominican Republic 1965-66
Peru 1965
Laos 1964-73
Vietnam 1961-73
Cambodia 1969-70
Guatemala 1967-69
Lebanon 1982-84
Grenada 1983-84
Libya 1986
El Salvador 1981-92
Nicaragua 1981-90
Iran 1987-88
Libya 1989
Panama 1989-90
Iraq 1991
Kuwait 1991
Somalia 1992-94
Bosnia 1995
Iran 1998
Sudan 1998
Afghanistan 1998
Yugoslavia – Serbia 1999
Afghanistan 2001
Libya 2011


2016-12-18 on nationalinterest

As to our contribution to WWII: about 10% in both Europe and Asia. For Europe, read the only longitudinal, quantitative study that draws directly from all major combatants’ archives: Europe at War 1939-1954 by Norman Davies.
https://www.amazon.com/Euro….

In our involvement with Japan, we never faced a Japanese army, but rather bombarded small island outposts before overrunning them. China and Russia faced 10x more Japanese. Japan surrendered because Russia entered the war. Their reaction to the atomic bomb (dropped to impress the Russians) was ‘meh’.

As to Korea, there’s always an excuse for losing: “They had machine guns!”, etc.

As you say, people are entitled to their opinions, and opinions about military hardware are almost always partisan, like yours (which are not facts). In real life fighting in Syria recently, Russian hardware proved 10x more effective than ours, including sortie rate–which depends on reliability as much as crew work. The Russians accomplished in 5 months what we couldn’t do in 5 years.


2016-12-15 on wired

99% of Chinese land transfers are like 99% of American land transfers: consensual, public and mutually profitable–regardless of the buyers’ and sellers’ identities. 99% of the stories we read are about the 1% of Chinese land transfers that go (or start) wrong.

Ghost cities? Another b.s. Western meme. In real life, ghost cities are abandoned (as you still see in post-gold rush Sierras) after their raison d’etre vanished.

That’s not the case with new Chinese cities: their raison d’etre has yet to appear and, when it does, they’ll all be occupied and the city will come alive. Chinese are canny, they won’t move until everything’s in place, including infrastructure, so sometimes it takes years for a new city to be occupied. But they’re all occupied and all doing what they’re supposed to do. There are no ‘ghost cities’ in China.


2016-12-11 on nationalinterest

The US didn’t have the engineering chops to nail their first moon landing, nor did they have the chops to create the rockets that took them there. China invented the rocket and, far from needing to steal space technology from the US, had to struggle to free the Chinese who invented America’s program, Hsue-Shen Tsien.

America hasn’t invented anything new in 30 years and 50% of the improvements it’s made were invented by Chinese engineers and scientists, who are listed on half the technology patents issued there each year.

China invented Hypersonic Space Weapons, Satellite Quantum Communications and In-Flight Satellite Refueling–none of which the USA possesses.

And, as I said, China has far more advanced technology in Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Radiotelescopy .


2016-12-11 on nationalinterest

Virtually everything you use every day was invented by China. While we invaded, occupied, burned and pillaged them for 100 years they were too busy to continue inventing but, up to 1800, they’d invented everything first.

Quality and reliability? China was the first country to put a lander on the moon on its first attempt. When was the last time any Western power invented a new technology, incidentally? And who was the original inventor?


2016-12-11 on nationalinterest

I recommend you read ‘Science and Civilization in China’ by Joseph Needham. It may take you some time, because the book catalogs all of China’s original inventions in 11,000 pages.

In the meantime, as I said, China leads the world in Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-Flight Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Radiotelescopy, Hypersonic Space Weapons and Satellite Quantum Communications.


2016-12-11 on nationalinterest

Not only do ALL migrant kids attend Shanghai’s free public school system, they must. It’s the law in China now, though Shanghai pioneered it 10 years ago. See https://www.amazon.com/Lear…

The top universities are the top universities because they are rich and because they attract Chinese who can’t get into top Chinese universities. Already Tsinghua has the best Engineering school in the world, http://blogs.wsj.com/chinar… and, at its current rate of progress, Beida will overtake Harvard within 20 years.

“The most innovative country in Asian is Japan”? Sure, that’s why Japan is years behind China in Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-Flight Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Radiotelescopy, Hypersonic Space Weapons and Satellite Quantum Communications.


2016-12-10 on nationalinterest

In fact the PISA tests have been given to a much wider sample of Chinese schools than Shanghai and Andreas Schleicher, the OECD’s head of PISA, announced that they scored ‘at or above’ the OECD (rich countries) average. The USA scored well below the OECD average. Additionally, 40% of Shanghai students were disadvantaged children of migrant workers, giving Shanghai the most resilient scores in the world.

China’s recent scientific and technological contributions are more significant than you give credit for. China leads the world in all branches of civil engineering, for example, as well as in Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-Flight Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Radiotelescopy, Hypersonic Space Weapons and Satellite Quantum Communications.

This tells you a little about Chinese education…


2016-12-10 on nationalinterest

Here’s a PISA report on the world’s best schools: http://www.oecd.org/pisa/ke….

The ‘so many’ who attend foreign schools do so because they cannot get into China’s free universities and can afford to go overseas. The smart ones go to university in China. All of them, as in 100%.

The ones who go to school abroad are attempting to escape meritocracy, which is what most rich kids do.

‘So many’ rich people of all nationalities settle in the US because the US has a high standard of living. But, as with China’s smartest students, most of China’s richest people prefer to live in China–which is why Beijing has the most billionaires on earth.

Capital is fleeing from China because opportunities for investment abroad are attractive and competition at home is ferocious. When American investors do that it’s called FDI and is a sign of American wonderfulness and beneficence. When Chinese investors do it it’s called ‘capital flight’ and it’s a sign that China is about to collapse.


2016-12-05 on extremetech

Apart from Emperors, a very mixed bag, China’s actual governments, its appointed officials, have looked much the same since 200 AD. They’ve all been selected by the same method, subscribed to the same governmental principles, enjoyed the same social prestige, and done a better job than their Western counterparts.

The current dynasty, absent an Emperor–no great loss, as European nations also discovered–is running the country like every previous dynasty and is the best government on earth running the biggest economy on earth, as usual. The significant difference is that the current dynasty is committed to a more inclusive version of Xiaokang Society than previous dynasties, who were content when urban China had reached Xiaokang. The CCP is extending that privilege to all Chinese, which is why their policy support, 96%, is so broad.

Do you seriously imagine that, if the current government were responsible for the deliberate famine deaths and murders of 45-80 million people, it would be the most trusted, most popular government on earth?

Those are WMD-style atrocity stories, fabricated by the very same people who fabricated the WMD lie itself and every other propagandistic fiction and political promise in our history.

After Mao stepped down–having served his entire tenure under an American economic embargo–the invaders and warlords were gone, life expectancy had risen from 42 to 67, the population had doubled, literacy had risen from 34% to 84%, electricity reached even poor areas, the economy had grown 500 percent, drug addiction was eliminated, women were liberated and educated and basic human rights and China’s infrastructure were fully restored. No postwar leader–indeed, probably no leader of any era–in history has a comparable record of improving the lives of his people. That’s why 85% of Chinese remember him fondly today while only 56% have warm memories of the West’s favorite ‘reformer’, Deng Xiaopeng.

The moral of this story is, don’t rely on Fox News for information about China.


2016-12-03 on extremetech

You’re correct about Hitler, but what does that have to do with the Chinese and their relationship to their government–to which they’ve had the same relationship for 2,200 years?


2016-12-03 on extremetech

“if you think what the Chinese people want matters to their government. China is a dictatorship.” That would be news to the Chinese.

According to a recent World Values Survey, (http://www.worldvaluessurve… 96 percent of Chinese expressed confidence in their government, compared to only 37 percent of Americans. Likewise, 83 percent of Chinese thought their country is run for all the people, rather than for a few big interest groups, whereas only 36 percent of Americans thought the same of their country. http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…

Trust? Edelman Trust Barometer: 80–90% of Chinese trust their government, the highest trust level of any national government.
http://www.slideshare.net/E…

According to the Pew Charitable Trusts, “Nine in ten Chinese are happy with the direction of their country (85%), feel good about the current state of their economy (91%) and are optimistic about China’s economic future.”
http://www.pewglobal.org/20…

And, for good measure, “Can You Criticize the Government of China?” Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.
http://www.inpraiseofchina….


2016-11-30 on zmescience

“XPNAV 1 is innovative, a word you won’t normally used to describe something made in China”?
Tibi, if you want to continue writing about technology you’ll need to learn Chinese. They already lead the world in Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-Flight Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Radiotelescopy, Hypersonic Space Weapons and Satellite Quantum Communications.
With more to come…


2016-11-26 on nationalinterest

I can understand concern about the Gulf of Mexico or the Caribbean, but why are we concerned about the South China Sea?
Worse, why are we antagonizing a country whose suite of defensive weapons can blow us out of those waters whenever they choose?
And worst, why are we picking a fight with a country whose economy is much larger than ours, whose manufacturing capacity is many times ours, and which can destroy every one of our cities in 45 minutes?
What’s the point, exactly?


2016-11-24 on wsws

‘Trump’s election has escalated Ankara’s nationalist, authoritarian and militarist agenda’.
Any self-respecting, independent nation’s policies can be readily characterized as ‘nationalist, authoritarian and militarist’. The description certainly fits the USA, for example, and the UK and France clearly aspire to it.


2016-11-07 on wired

No-one who seriously examines the J-20 and J-31 imagines they depended on the F-22 and F0-35 for anything. The fact that a self-promoting hacker gained access to peripheral files 8 years ago and got a wrist-slap for it suggest that he didn’t get anything useful and didn’t transfer what he had.


2016-11-07 on evonomics

“Whoever is devoid of the heart of compassion is not human, whoever is devoid of the heart of shame is not human, whoever is devoid of the heart of courtesy and modesty is not human, and whoever is devoid of the heart of right and wrong is not human. The heart of compassion is the germ of benevolence (ren); the heart of shame is the germ of dutifulness; the heart of courtesy and modesty is the germ observance of the rites; the heart of right and wrong is the germ of wisdom. Man has these four germs just as he has four limbs”.–Mencius, II A, 6, trans. D.C. Lau)


2016-11-04 on nationalinterest

“dealt with the Japanese almost single-handedly”? No. Russia and China defeated the Japanese. Our participation in the Pacific theater was helpful, but did not involve facing significant Japanese forces and Japan surrendered because Russia entered the war.

“we didn’t destroy the North Koreans but we did protect the South’s independence, which was our goal”. Protect the South’s independence? Give me a break. We replaced the Japanese occupying forces there, subjugated the South, installed a puppet government and took command of their military which we retain to this day.

If you consider the ME invasions of small, relatively defenseless countries ‘wars’, then OK. But we’ve been defeated in all of those theaters sine the Glory Days.

“a war ends when the opposing power is destroyed”. It’s too soon to tell if we’ve destroyed ourselves which, as you may recall, was OBL’s stated intention.

“We wiped the Iraqi and Afghani governments off the map in a matter of weeks” since then they’re wiping the floor with us for years and we all know how those are going to end.


2016-11-01 on bloombergview

Res ipsa loquitur, baby. Res ipsa loquitur.

Her’s Gideon Rachmann of the Financial Times: “It is clearly true that China has enormous political and economic challenges ahead. Yet future instability is highly unlikely to derail the rise of China. Whatever the wishful thinking of some in the west, we are not suddenly going to wake up and discover that the Chinese miracle was, in fact, a mirage. My own scepticism about China is tempered by the knowledge that analysts in the west have been predicting the end of the Chinese boom almost since it began. In the mid-1990s, as the Asia editor of The Economist, I was perpetually running stories about the inherent instability of China – whether it was dire predictions about the fragility of the banking system, or reports of savage infighting at the top of the Communist party. In 2003, I purchased a much-acclaimed book, Gordon Chang’s, The Coming Collapse of China – which predicted that the Chinese miracle had five years to run, at most. So now, when I read that China’s banks are near collapse, that the countryside is in a ferment of unrest, that the cities are on the brink of environmental disaster and that the middle-classes are in revolt, I am tempted to yawn and turn the page. I really have heard it all before”.


2016-11-01 on bloombergview

As long as the World Bank and the Bank of International Settlements use internally consistent methods of measuring debt and GDP, and their results are in rough agreement, then we can accept their figures: the WB has access to the PBOC’s books and the BIS monitors every foreign transaction that China makes.

We can accept the Chinese government’s figures because they’ve always been accurate, for 40 years. They’ve never been wrong or misleading. Never once. They’ve not even had to be ‘restated’ the way ours regularly are. If you want to investigate their accuracy read Carsten Holz, dean of Chinese Government statistics studies: The quality of China’s GDP statistics. Carsten A. HOLZ http://watson.brown.edu/fil…
On the regulatory front we have “On the Reliability of Chinese Output Figures”. John Fernald, Israel Malkin, and Mark Spiegel, FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO
http://www.frbsf.org/econom…
A detailed analysis of China’s GDP indicates its economy is actually 15% larger than official figures: http://csis.org/files/publi…
China’s Economy May Be Even Bigger Than You Think
http://www.bloomberg.com/ne….

Please stop making unsupported claims. You’re not an expert on China so, if you want to make claims, provide your authority for them, and not just more examples of other, equally ignorant, people making similar claims and accusations.

I said, “If there’s a fake, artificial, stimulus-driven economy it’s the USA’s. It’s manufacturing capacity is a fraction of China’s and it has run trade deficits for 30 years straight”. That means the US economy is fake, artificial and stimulus-driven and the US has run trade deficits for 30 years straight. Which it has.

“”None had died from the Great Leap Forward”? You are unbelievable liar.”

You know nothing about China or the Great Leap or my evidence for making that claim, yet you call me a liar?

China’s rapidly growing population, combined with one of the worst droughts in modern history, forced China to import 30 million tons of grain between 1961 and 1965. They tried to import more when Australia, with a huge grain surplus, offered to provide unlimited credit but the US forbade further shipments and assigned the CIA to monitor the results of the embargo. At the height of China’s worst drought in living memory, the Agency reported:

“4 April 1961: The Chinese Communist regime is now facing the most serious economic difficulties it has confronted since it consolidated its power over mainland China. As a result of economic mismanagement, and, especially, of two years of unfavorable weather, food production in 1960 was little if any larger than in 1957 at which time there were about 50 million fewer Chinese to feed. Widespread famine does not appear to be at hand, but in some provinces many people are now on a bare subsistence diet and the bitterest suffering lies immediately ahead in the period before the June harvests. The dislocations caused by the ‘Leap Forward’ and the removal of Soviet technicians have disrupted China’s industrialization program. These difficulties have sharply reduced the rate of economic growth during 1960 and have created a serious balance of payments problem. Public morale, especially in rural areas, is almost certainly at its lowest point since the Communists assumed power, and there have been some instances of open dissidence.

The next year was just as disappointing as the previous one: the embargo wasn’t working:

“2 May 1962: The future course of events in Communist China will be shaped largely by three highly unpredictable variables: the wisdom and realism of the leadership, the level of agricultural output, and the nature and extent of foreign economic relations. During the past few years all three variables have worked against China. In 1958 the leadership adopted a series of ill-conceived and extremist economic and social programs; in 1959 there occurred the first of three years of bad crop weather; and in 1960 Soviet economic and technical cooperation was largely suspended. The combination of these three factors has brought economic chaos to the country. Malnutrition is widespread, foreign trade is down, and industrial production and development have dropped sharply. No quick recovery from the regime’s economic troubles is in sight”.

U.S. Government sources believed that economic warfare would lead to the China’s collapse and waited until 1969 to lift the embargo, after trying to starve hundreds of millions of people. Thanks to ration books and efficient distribution, everyone had something to eat every day. Our strategists did not count on the fact that, despite drought and famine, most Chinese were better off than they had been for a century.

Liu talked and still talks out of both sides of his mouth. The entire point of Tiananmen was to incite violence and overthrow the government which would, as we’ve learned by overthrowing other governments, have killed millions. Liu is no dummy. He wanted to kill millions and acted on that desire.


2016-10-31 on bloombergview

I rely on ‘Stilwell–American Experience in China’ for my reference. The book has been in print for many years and has stood the test of time and historians’ scrutiny.https://www.amazon.com/Stilwell-Ame…

You have no idea what Mao told new recruits. Stop making stuff up.

You’re trying to male a mountain of debt out of a molehill. The World Bank gives the following ratios for Debt to GDP:
Japan: 390% at 0% growth
USA: 290% at 2% growth
China: 235% at 6.5% growth

The Bank for International Settlements (BIS) gives the following ratios for debt to GDP:
Japan: 393 %
USA: 239 %
China: 235%
http://www.bis.org/publ/qtr…

If there’s a fake, artificial, stimulus-driven economy it’s the USA’s. It’s manufacturing capacity is a fraction of China’s and it has run trade deficits for 30 years straight.

Hong Kong and Macao are independentand highly solvent and have always been fiscally conservative.

According to Mao’s enemies in China at the time, 38,000 people died in the Cultural Revolution and, according the the CIA, none died in the Great Leap Forward. Where do you get your figures? Fox News?

Liu’s income was proudly displayed on the NED’s own website and, for all I know, still is. When he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, the award singled out his leadership in the Tiananmen affair (for which he served two years in prison) and his attempt to subvert the Government of China via his Charter ’08. And he endorsed the Iraq war very publicly to Western media. You don’t need Chinese media to tell you about the guy.


2016-10-31 on bloombergview

General Stilwell, whom the US assigned to mentor Chiang, called him ‘Peanut’ and reported that he was stupid, gutless, and unwilling to fight the Japanese, even after Mao offered the Red Army to fight alongside Chiang’s forces under U.S. command. Chiang was a warlord hated by everyone but the USA.

Skeptics about China abound and second-guessing gets you nowhere. The Economist magazine has predicted 56 ‘hard landings’ for China’s economy since 1979. They’ve all been wrong. 100% wrong. The stats are with Mao, as are the people he saved: 85% of Chinese, and 95% of rural Chinese regard him as a hero.

The Cultural Revolution contributed to the deaths of 38,000 people, according to Mao’s Chinese enemies at the time, who knew what was going on. According to the CIA and Western observers in China at the time, nobody died of starvation, despite the US Grain Embargo that was intended to create starvation.

“Why did they imprisoned him (Liu) China if he fought human rights abuses in Iraq?” They didn’t. Nor did I say or suggest they did. Liu had been a CIA operative since 1988 and jailed for his part in attempting the violent overthrow of the government from 1989-91. And again later. Finally, after he’d taken hundreds of thousands of dollars from the CIA and advocated the violent overthrow of the government again, he was sentence to 11 years. You can read the verdict and find the transcripts here: A copy of Liu’s sentence: http://news.sina.com.hk/cgi….

Here’s a copy of Liu’s appeal notice: http://www.bullogger.com/bl….

The verdict document stated Liu Xiaobo openend the Bank of China account using his wife’s name, where payments from abroad for his articles were deposited: “劉曉波在銀行以她的名字開戶,稿費不定期的匯到帳戶裏… 帳戶接收和支取過境外匯款”

Also, according to legal experts in China, Liu’s subversion case would have yielded the same result in US. Based on Schenck v. United States, political speech can be reasonably limited if the government deems it “clear and present danger”.

As in the Schenck case, the Chinese government has the right to deem Liu’s call to abolish China’s constitution, at the sponsorship of foreign entity, as exceeding the limit of free speech. Not to mention the act of carrying out the threat in collusion with foreign entities that are hostile to the Chinese government when, legally, only the NPC has the authority to amend the constitution: 修宪权属于我国的最高权力机关,即全国人民代表大会).

There is no ‘human right’ to impose factional politics on a country, or to practice factional politics anywhere. It’s one way of doing politics which, I suggest, isn’t working in the developed countries and has utterly failed in developing countries like India, South Africa and the Philippines.

Liu was obviously sincere but, as Bradley Manning learned, sincerity doesn’t trump national security. Not in the USA. Not in China. Not anywhere.


2016-10-30 on bloombergview

When Mao co-founded the Chinese Communist Party in 1921, China was dominated by military forces from France, Great Britain, Italy, Japan and the United States and Japan, overrun by warlords and drifting into civil war. By 1949, after he’d thrown out the invaders, beaten the warlords and ended the civil war, life expectancy was 41 years, literacy was 13 percent, electricity was available in a few cities and the country lay in ruins. When he stepped down in 1979, literacy was 84 percent, electricity reached even poor areas, the population had doubled, life expectancy was 67, the economy had grown 500 percent and China’s basic infrastructure was fully restored. No revolutionary leader in history has a remotely comparable record of successful postwar government
The 1951 treaty was negotiated and signed in good faith by both parties. There was no duress. Look at the terms: it allowed all its government officials to remain in their positions and to maintain the established status, functions and powers of the Dalai Lama. Tibet would remain a theocracy and retain its autonomy and most military and diplomatic matters. China’s policy of religious freedom would apply to Tibet and the Tibetan people’s religious beliefs, customs and habits would be respected, along with the monasteries and their incomes. Do you see any signs of duress there?
The gold that the Dalai Lama took belonged to the people of Tibet, not to him and his cronies. He abandoned a destitute, impoverished population in favor of a cushy job with the CIA. So the Chinese stepped in and now, maternal mortality, five percent in 1951, is below to 0.175 percent. Infant mortality dropped from 43 percent to 0.66 percent while life expectancy rose from 35 to 68.

GDP has risen thirtyfold. In 1978, when it was measured for the first time, per capita urban income was $200. In 2015 it hit $3,807. Farmers and herdsmen averaged $2,000: an average annual increase of 12 percent. Much of those gains can be credited to Tibet’s 22,500 km of new highway and the world’s highest railway, which connects it to the wider world for the first time.

Today, 98 percent of children attend free public schools where classes are taught in the Tibetan language (math, physics, and chemistry are taught in Chinese). Farmers’ children attend schools with free accommodation, food, clothing, and school supplies and illiteracy has fallen from 90 percent to four percent in people under 50. The two campuses of Tibet University today enroll 30,000 students and have graduated 10,000 since they were built in 1985.

Liu never fought against human rights abuses anywhere. He fought FOR human rights abuses in Iraq.


2016-10-30 on bloombergview

For 1800 of the past 2,000 years China was the world’s leading economy, technologically and financially. It is again today, despite Western attempts to invade it, starve it into submission from 1959-1969, bomb it in 1999 and surround it militarily. It already leads the West in a dozen key technologies like computing, quantum physics, and defensive weaponry.

China is not a constitutional democracy. Your reading of China’s constitution is as faulty as your understanding of its role in China’s governance. Xi changed nothing in the performance of his function as Chairman and Commander in Chief–which has remained essentially unchanged since Mao’s retirement.

He is known as the “chairman of everything that moves” only in your head.

Far from being ‘wanted’, the Dalai Lama is unwelcome in China, largely because he did not honor the 1951 treaty, fled with all the gold in the Tibetan Treasury, took $100 million from the CIA, supported Chilean mass murderer, Augusto Pinochet, praised the Iraq War and Shoko Asahara (who gave the Dalai Lama $2 million in response for which the Dalai Lama told Kyodo News he was impressed by Asahara’s seriousness and spirituality; Asahara then poured Sarin gas into Tokyo’s Subway). He endorsed fellow CIA beneficiary, Liu Xiaobo, for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2010 after Liu praised the Iraq war. Nobody want people like that. Nobody.


2016-10-30 on bloombergview

It’s impossible for a corrupt government to have accomplished what the Chinese government has done for its people in the past 70 years. Utterly impossible.
Yet you appear to know something about China that the Chinese people don’t know (and is unsupported by observable facts).
It sounds as though you get your information from Fox News.
Do you?


2016-10-27 on wsws

Wow! This is a complete misinterpretation of Confucian government. It shows total lack of familiarity with 1,800 years of continuous development of the most successful governance model on earth. For those interested, read F.W. Mote’s ‘Imperial China’ on this.

And statements like ‘Xi’s determination to stamp out any threat from rivals is not just the product of personal ambition, but reflects the inner crisis of the Stalinist regime which confronts a slowing economy, mounting social and class tensions and Washington’s aggressive “pivot to Asia” aimed at undermining and subordinating China’ are simply counterfactual.

Xi has famously never had a threat or a rival in his career. Anyone who’s studied the guy will understand why.

Stalinist? In what sense? China’s economy is speeding up, not slowing down, for God’s sake. That’s what the 6.5% figure indicates: it’s a measure of acceleration, not growth. Growth is doubling every ten years.

Mounting social and class tensions? Give me a break! The current administration has over 80% trust and 96% policy approval, with a steadily improving GINI coefficient. No government on earth comes close.

And ‘Washington’s aggressive “pivot to Asia” was always a joke. Especially here in Asia, where I live, people have been laughing up their sleeves at US policies. They know which side their bread it buttered on and they know that China has the weapons and the willingness to destroy any American threat in the West Pacific whenever they so choose.

The entire article is a pseudo-left restatement of the usual right wing nonsense about China with all the cultural blindness and deafness of a Western imperialist.


2016-10-27 on bloombergview

The legitimacy of the current government of China, and of all its past governments, rests on moral virtue.

In 2010, Charlie Rose quizzed Lee Hsien Loong, son of the founder and lifetime Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Kwan Yew, “You seem to be sensitive to the issue of what’s called nepotism”.

Lee replied, “Our system is founded on the concept of meritocracy. If anybody doubts that I, as Prime Minister, am here not because I am the best man for the job but because my father fixed it, then my credibility and moral authority are destroyed. First you must have the moral right, then you can make the right decisions. It’s a basic Confucian precept”.

Lee explained that Singapore is a Confucian meritocracy in which the most learned, capable and honest men rise to the top and that their erudition, competence and honesty give them the right to rule.

A Singapore government White Paper says, “Many Confucian ideals are more relevant to Singapore than political ideologies borrowed from the West. The concept of government by honorable men, junzi–who have a duty to do right for the people and who have their trust and respect–fits us better than the Western idea that government power should be as limited as possible”.

Lee Kwan Yew, who’d known him since his youth, called China’s President Xi Jinping “morally remarkable; a Chinese Mandela”. That’s the basis for his legitimacy.


2016-10-27 on bloombergview

‘With its debts surging and growth sluggish,’???

Nonsense. You and others have been running this silly story for decades. It’s always been wrong and it’s still wrong.

The Bank for International Settlements (BIS) gives these ratios for debt to GDP:
Japan: 393% – GDP growing 0%
USA: 239 % – GDP growing 1.5%
China: 235% – GDP growing 6.5%
http://www.bis.org/publ/qtr…

China’s debt fragilities are overstated. The quality of its debt (yield) is high. Its debts don’t threaten the model. In real life, corporate net debt is near zero, private savings are $3+ trillion, foreign reserves $3 trillion. The proof is in the numbers. Not just headline growth, but stable and low inflation, strong wage growth and rising tax revenue.

Here’s their external debt: https://en.wikipedia.org/wi….


2016-10-20 on bloombergview

We can both enjoy watching the truth come out.

Since 1979 the truth has been 100% on my side but, hey, you might get lucky.


2016-10-20 on bloombergview

Fancy derailing a discussion but aren’t sure how to go about it? Can’t be bothered discussing things properly and would much rather chuck a spanner in the works? No worries. Simply use the Derailing for Dummies guide and you need never think too hard about complicated things again!

You are a troll.

Name-calling is trolling: ‘wumao’, ‘paid poster’, etc. are just your own imagining.

Unsubstantiated claims is trolling: ‘You post everywhere with lies and exaggerations’ but produce no examples, let alone serious rebuttals.

Exaggerated claims like ‘If Chinese numbers have been rock solid for decades then how come nobody believes them – especially investors?’ are just silly on their face. The CIA believes them. The WTO, which monitors them, believes them. The World Bank and the IMF believe them. The world’s biggest investors believe them.

A detailed analysis of China’s GDP indicates its economy is actually 15% larger than official figures: http://csis.org/files/publi….

Anecdotally, we have Marc Mobius, CEO of the Franklin Templeton Fund: “I know there’s a lot of debate as to whether the numbers are true, whether it’s really 6 percent or 7 percent, but our numbers indicate that it is at least that. We think that a lot of the economy is not really being counted because China is being converted from a manufacturing-oriented economy to a service economy.” http://www.bloomberg.com/ne….

Academically we have the Federal Reserve and Carsten Holz, dean of Chinese Government statistics studies: The quality of China’s GDP statistics. Carsten A. HOLZ http://watson.brown.edu/fil…

On the regulatory front we have “On the Reliability of Chinese Output Figures”. John Fernald, Israel Malkin, and Mark Spiegel, FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO

http://www.frbsf.org/econom…

You are a troll. A nuisance.


2016-10-20 on bloombergview

‘China has made clear it has no intention of promoting the same values the U.S. has sought to export to the rest of the world — including democracy, freedom of expression and the rule of law’??

Kidding, right:? The US abandoned democracy ten years ago: 13% of Americans say the government can be trusted to do what is right always or most of the time. CNN Poll: Trust in government at all-time low. http://politicalticker.blog…

New Evidence on How Money Shapes America’s Elections. http://www.nakedcapitalism….

90 percent of Americans lack confidence in the country’s political system. From the Associated Press–NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. http://www.apnorc.org/Pages…

Jimmy Carter: U.S. Is an ‘Oligarchy With Unlimited Political Bribery. http://www.rollingstone.com…

Mass-based interest groups and average citizens have little or no independent influence on political decisions. The US has loudly trumpeted itself as a democracy for generations when it was and is a brutal oligarchy. See “Testing Theories of American Politics,” by Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page in Perspectives on Politics, The American Political Science Association September 2014. http://journals.cambridge.o…
“The central point that emerges from our research,” Gilens and Page find, “is that economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on U.S. government policy…while mass-based interest groups and average citizens have little or no independent influence.” As Gilens told the online journal Talking Points Memo two years ago, “ordinary citizens have virtually no influence over what their government does in the United States.”


2016-10-20 on bloombergview

“First, most observers of Chinese debt put your Chinese debt to GDP at least at 260%”?
‘Most observers’ have been consistently wrong for 40 years. The World Bank (a non-Chinese agency: who knew?) has been consistently right – perhaps because it audits the PBOC accounts? I dunno…

“Second, you are inflating US debt to GDP – it is estimated at about 240%”.?
Write to the World Bank. Ask them if they’re inflating the US figure. Believe it or not, they’ll respond if your question is germane. They have people who respond to real questions.

“Third, the growth of debt is important. Chinese debt continues to grow much, much faster than US debt….”?
We won’t know China’s (or anyone’s) net debt growth until the fat lady sings. Until then, we’ll continue to read the speculative nonsense from self-promoters like McKinsey.

“Fourth, China is not growing at 6.7% or even 6.5%… Most outside experts peg it at somewhere around 3% or less. Untruthful numbers may put a happy face on the problem and keep the communists looking good – but the truth behind the curtain will eventually come out”.?
All negative predictions by ‘outside experts’ have been proven wrong for 40 years. There are two real experts – who’ve devoted staff and resources to the issue for decades – whose opinion is at least worth examining: Carsten A. HOLZ. ‘The quality of China’s GDP statistics’. http://watson.brown.edu/fil…
John Fernald, Israel Malkin, and Mark Spiegel, FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO ‘On the Reliability of Chinese Output Figures’. http://www.frbsf.org/econom…

China’s figures have been rock solid for decades. They have NEVER been shown to be exaggerated, misleading, or wrong. This may have something to do with the fact that the government of China has been collecting and analyzing statistics for 2,500 years. Again, this is just a wild guess.

Hating China is not a useful foundation for understanding it. Insulting people who study China seriously makes you look like a troll.


2016-10-18 on bloombergview

Fancy derailing a discussion but aren’t sure how to go about it? Can’t be bothered discussing things properly and would much rather chuck a spanner in the works? No worries. Simply use the ‘Derailing for Dummies’ guide and you need never think too hard about complicated things again!

Making unsupported allegations is little better than trolling. In fact, it is trolling.


2016-10-17 on bloombergview

Hmmm. The World Bank gives the following ratios for Debt to GDP:
Japan: 390% at 0% growth
USA: 290% at 1.5% growth
China: 235% at 6.5% growth
Chart http://www.inpraiseofchina…..

And the quality of China’s debt is very high indeed, as the St. Louis Fed observed: “Is Government Spending a Free Lunch? Evidence from China”. Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. https://research.stlouisfed…

Last week Zhou Xiaochuan, governor of the People’s Bank ofChina (PBOC): Chinese banks’ non-performing loan ratio rose to 1.75 percent at the end of June, stable from a quarter earlier but up from 1.67 percent at the end of 2015, with bad loans reaching 1.44 trillion yuan, according to official data. In August, China’s new yuan-denominated lending more than doubled from a month earlier to 948.7 billion yuan (about $145.95 billion), with mortgages representing 55.7 percent of the 529 billion yuan in household loans. Zhou said the fast credit expansion reflected China’s efforts to tackle risks and prop up the economy against the backdrop of lackluster global growth. China will control its credit growth as the global economy heads for a steady recovery, Zhou said, reiterating views he stated earlier at a meeting of G20 finance ministers and central bank governors. http://www.chinadaily.com.c…


2016-10-14 on theasanforum

Or…we could see (are seeing?) a steady drift back to China’s preferred mode of relating to its neighbors, as they become tributary states. That pattern is ancient and worked well, and all parties know the rules, so why not?


2016-10-09 on nationalinterest

The US has never won a war. Get over it.
It’s skinny kids who are beating us in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria and Libya. Today. And skinny Russian and Chinese kids who will beat us if we annoy them tomorrow.
The US military’s only distinction is its unequalled, 200-year record for killing civilians. It even killed more French civilians in WWII than the Germans. Millions of Vietnamese civilians, of course, and at least a million Iraqi children (which our beloved Secretary of State said was “worth it”).


2016-10-09 on nationalinterest

Who on earth is Boris? What facts did he get wrong?


2016-10-06 on theasanforum

‘Southeast Asian states also remember the fuller history of ASEAN-China relations, whether it be the Cold War decades where communist China was seen as an ideological and security threat by some, or the post-Cold War period where fears of growing economic competition and simmering territorial disputes still colored regional perceptions.’

They also remember the Asian Financial Crisis, when the only country that stood by them was China, which refused to devalue the RMB and provided loans to save them from bankruptcy. More recently, they remember China running trade deficits with all of them.

They’re not stupid.


2016-09-28 on nationalinterest

Anyone who thinks China will allow the USN Taiwan to remain independent doesn’t understand geopolitics. It’s a mortal threat to China and, since the rest of the world has endorsed the One China Policy, repeatedly, it’s a purely domestic matter as to when and how formal reunification occurs.
There is nothing the US can do to prevent a military takeover, either, since China’s defensive/offensive arsenal is a generation ahead of ours. The only constraint on China is the optics of the thing.


2016-09-28 on nationalinterest

China coverage is pretty much a free-fire zone in these media; only North Korea and Russia get worse press. The Chinese must be peeing their pants with delight. By the time we wake up to what they’ve done the game will be over, lights shutting off and the crowd heading out the turnstiles. That’s timed for mid-2021, incidentally.
It’s free in. Not free of.


2016-09-28 on lowyinterpreter

Richard McGregor claims that SOEs are not a source of profit any longer. The most profitable, most valuable companies on earth are Chinese SOEs. They’re integral to the smooth operation of China’s economy.
As to Chinese opinions of Xi Jinping being difficult to discover? Nonsense. He’s gotten very consistent marks in survey after survey. According to a recent World Values Survey, (http://www.worldvaluessurve… 96 percent of Chinese expressed confidence in their government, compared to only 37 percent of Americans. Likewise, 83 percent of Chinese thought their country is run for all the people, rather than for a few big interest groups, whereas only 36 percent of Americans thought the same of their country. http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs…


2016-09-28 on nationalinterest

Do the principals of the schools in your districts have limos and chauffeurs? Are your teachers limited to 15 hours a week of classroom instruction? Do people bow to them when they encounter them at the supermarket on Saturday mornings?
If you answer ‘no’ to any of these questions you can understand why Chinese parents will lie, cheat and steal to get their kids into a Shanghai public school – despite the fact that there are much bigger, better school systems in China.


2016-09-28 on nationalinterest

President Hu was a poor boy who won a scholarship to Tsinghua. Xi was refused admission for being unprepared (he grew up in a village without a school). His dad’s friends twisted arms and got him in but Tsinghua only granted him a ‘certificate of participation’ on graduation, not a degree with a diploma. Chinese universities are tough.

China has devoted more time to rule of law, in theory and practice, than Western nations combined.http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/…

China’s elites, like ours, do indeed make the rules. They just make better ones. According to a recent World Values Survey, 96% of Chinese expressed confidence in their government, compared to only 37% of Americans. Likewise, 83% of Chinese thought their country is run for all the people, rather than for a few big interest groups, whereas only 36% of Americans thought the same of their country. http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs/WV

Senior officials’ kids get special schools because their parents are transferred every 2-3 years. It’s a publicly-acknowledged perk that offsets their meagre salaries.

The White House has its own organic garden, too, and Michelle Obama tends it. I have heard little public outcry over this.

About 20% of Party members profit from their membership – not much different from those who profit from their lifetime membership in the Republican Party. Many of the current crop of officials have wealthy relatives but that’s mostly because they were born at the right time and went to university when only 5% of kids did. Today, China is creating a new millionaire every day and a new billionaire every week. And guess where their #1 choice is to live? Beijing. #2 is Shanghai.


2016-09-28 on nationalinterest

I plan to ask God to intervene directly. I am not hopeful.


2016-09-27 on nationalinterest

When you refer to such stories, always give links to them so everyone can see what you’re talking about and make their own contributions. Historically, exam cheating was invented exactly 12 minutes after the invention of exams, and is not confined to the Chinese, as we see here..

64 Ivy League Students Were Just Charged With Cheating — During …
https://mic.com/…/64-ivy-… 10, 2015 – Dartmouth College, the Ivy League school in Hanover, New Hampshire, that educated Timothy Geithner, Robert Frost, three Nobel laureates and Stephen Colbert (fictional version), has charged 64 students, many of them varsity athletes, with honor code violations following allegations of widespread cheating — in a sports …

2012 Harvard cheating scandal – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wi…
The 2012 Harvard cheating scandal involved approximately 125 Harvard University students …. Harvard Crimson varsity team athletes will lose a year of Ivy League eligibility if they play any games and are forced to withdraw. If they register and …
‎Government 1310: “Introduction … · ‎Investigation · ‎Discipline · ‎Reaction


2016-09-26 on nationalinterest

China leads the world in all those technologies and some of them are original to China. It did not attain leadership by buying leadership, it attained leadership by out-inventing every country on earth.


2016-09-26 on nationalinterest

Counting Chinese with your fingers is futile. The children of China’s elite who cannot get into top Chinese universities attend foreign universities and their numbers are, in aggregate, negligible.


2016-09-26 on nationalinterest

China doesn’t copy other people’s technology any more than any country does. Moreover, it leads the world in technologies like Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-Flight Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Radiotelescopy, Hypersonic Space Weapons and Satellite Quantum Communications.


2016-09-26 on nationalinterest

Given that China has the best school systems on earth, it cannot be long before they transfer their pedagogical techniques to flight training. About a week, I’d estimate.


2016-09-24 on andrewserickson

Fleets win battles. Economies win wars. China has won the war that Andrew seeks to provoke.


2016-09-21 on whowhatwhy

If you Google “The War on Terrorism is a False Promise for Security.” you get one hit: this page. What’s going on?


2016-09-16 on theaviationist

How did an external insulator penetrate the fuel lines? Anyone?


2016-09-15 on bloombergview

Not entirely…
Cisco drops Huawei lawsuit: https://www.bloomberg.com/v…

Huawei’s response comes after Cisco general counsel Mark Chandler argued in a blog post that Huawei Corporate Senior Vice President Charles Ding had misstated the facts about how Cisco’s lawsuit against the Chinese telecom company ended. Cisco had previously sued Huawei for using Cisco’s source code in its products without permission.

[Cisco’s Chandler published a set of excerpts from an expert’s report that provided examples of Huawei infringing on various strings of Cisco’s source code. Chandler wrote that he was able to publish the excerpts because the lawsuit agreement settled between the two companies “allows either party to make a reasonable response to improper or impermissible statements by the other.”

Ding said in public comments that no infringement was found in the suit and the source code in question was from a third party and already available online, according to Chandler.]


2016-09-15 on bloombergview

“I know by direct experience that the Chinese security apparatus does indeed have the means to hack one’s electronic devices ”
So does every security agency above the level of Botswana’s.

Your reasoning leads to the conclusion that, above the level of toasters and rice-cookers, we should ban Chinese electronic equipment. Since their market is much bigger than ours and their 5G standard more advanced than ours, your train of reasoning suggests we exclude ourselves from the Chinese market–a conclusion IBM, Cisco and Qualcomm are unlikely to embrace.

And as to your claim that Huawei has ‘grown not only through illicit means in its earlier days’: can you offer any proof?


2016-09-13 on asiatimes

Great reporting. We suspected Duterte was getting shafted. Thanks for digging into it.


2016-09-08 on nationalinterest

The Germans had considerable early success in both world wars but, like us, they lost them.
Winners aren’t the combatants with the lowest casualties, they’re the ones who, after the shooting stops, remain in command of the field. We don’t command the field in any of our theaters of combat, which is a nice way of saying that, after spending trillions of dollars, we lost.


2016-09-08 on chinalawblog

It’s difficult to translate the US’s refusal to use the agreed-upon, customary staircase (that was fine for every other attendee) into China’s ‘dissing’ America.
The President’s party, for whatever reason, preferred that he use the more secure exit, which meant the airport managers had to improvise their arrangements around that choice.
(The video clip we were shown omitted the American officials’ beginning the encounter by yelling at the Chinese, for some reason).


2016-09-03 on nationalinterest

Of what possible relevance are the squabbles between Imperial Russia and Imperial China?


2016-09-03 on nationalinterest

Just as I suspected. You’re making stuff up.


2016-09-02 on nationalinterest

The links, please. The links. Just the links.


2016-09-01 on nationalinterest

Just list the attacks you speak of, and provide links, please.


2016-08-31 on nationalinterest

Let’s use the same standards as we apply to attacks by the USA or ISIS: shooting, bombing, bayoneting, landmines, the standard definition, in other words.


2016-08-31 on nationalinterest

Like most religionists you seem unable to distinguish between claims and evidence: “If I claim that something’s so – that a separate, invisible God created everything, say – then it must be so”.


2016-08-31 on nationalinterest

All insults. Zero information.

Your contributions are just stuff like, “Man is born with a death sentence which could become eternal if we don’t heed the warning and avail ourselves of the salvation God offers. Given the ghastly fate that awaits anyone going into eternity without Christ, such things sober me and I wonder what they faced when they took that last breath.”

Seriously?


2016-08-31 on russiainsider

Thanks. I’ll keep an eye out for that and ask Andre Orlovski if he knows more. IT’s one of those strategic assets that are easily overlooked.



2016-08-30 on russiainsider

Could you write a full article on that? Or provide a link to an existing piece? It sounds fascinating.


2016-08-30 on nationalinterest

‘He was then immediately repudiated by said economist who demonstrably showed Godfree had zero knowledge of economics.’
Please let us all in on this memorable exchange: provide the link.


2016-08-30 on nationalinterest

Links, please, not just heavy breathing


2016-08-29 on nationalinterest

Bombs? Artillery? Naval shelling? Strafing? How many killed? How many wounded? Widows? Photographs, please..


2016-08-29 on nationalinterest

The US is currently attacking three countries and has attacked 25 in the past 30 years.
How many is China currently attacking? How many have China attacked in the past 30 years?


2016-08-29 on nationalinterest

Read the Congressional reports on those weapons. Read the USNI reports on them. Then tell me they’re propagandistic and imaginary.
Don’t fall for the usual militaristic boasting. Our weapons are obsolete and our army has never won a war. Our productive capacity is a fraction of China’s and our economy is considerably smaller.


2016-08-29 on nationalinterest

Do you mean my sentence, “We must remember that we have yet to win our first war, unless you count Grenada”?
If so, can you name a war we’ve won? Just one will be sufficient.


2016-08-29 on nationalinterest

Naval battles belong in the 20th century. Look again at China’s arsenal. Tell me how the US could prevail against its defensive weapons suite above.


2016-08-29 on nationalinterest

Given what you know about the Chinese arsenal, can you outline a scenario in which the US attacks China and wins?


2016-08-28 on nationalinterest

You’re planning to re-fight Jutland? The Coral Sea perhaps?
Naval battles are so 20th. century. Our admirals have been preparing for the last war, not the next.


2016-08-28 on nationalinterest

Here’s a selection of conventional and innovative weapons.
DF-21D 1,000 mile anti-ship ballistic missiles
DF-26D 2,000 mile anti-ship ballistic missiles
West Pacific Surveillance and Targeting satellite combined with 12 BeiDou positioning, navigation, and timing satellites with 10 cm. accuracy.
Seabed sensor fixed sonar arrays
83 Type 22 patrol ships, each with eight C-802 anti-ship missiles
YJ-12 anti-ship cruise missiles
C-802 anti-ship missiles
Yu-8 torpedo-carrying missile that vastly expands the range and speed of the torpedo
30 Type 056 missile frigates
12 Type 052D Arleigh Burke-class destroyers
13 Song Type 039 ‘Black Hole’ subs, (plus four advanced nuclear subs).
J-20 and J-31 fighters – comparable to the F-35 and F-22
S-400 antimissile-antiaircraft system
Type 65 wake-homing torpedoes
S-400 anti aircraft antimissile systems
DF-ZF Prompt Global Strike hypersonic glide vehicle
200,000 ocean-going fishing boats and 4,000 ocean freighters, all members of China’s merchant marine, manned by experienced sailors and equipped with direct communication links to the PLA Navy, tasked with reporting the movements of all combatants 24×7.

Gallup ran an interesting international survey in 2014: “If there were a war that involved [your country], would you be willing to fight for [your country]?”
Willing to Fight – Refuse to Fight:
China 71% – 23%
Russia 59% – 20%
USA 44% – 31%
France 29% – 44%
UK 27% – 51%
Germany 18% – 62%


2016-08-27 on nationalinterest

Everything I said is verifiable. If it tastes bitter perhaps it’s because you’ve only been fed sugar all your life.
I don’t support them but I know their history and feel that, by presenting it, I can help avoid our losing another war – one of the consequences of which would be a collapse of the dollar, and my income.


2016-08-27 on nationalinterest

During a meeting with charge d’affaires ad interim Li Zhimin of the Chinese Embassy in Vietnam on 15 June 1956, Vice Foreign Minister of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam Ung Van Khiem solemnly stated that, “according to Vietnamese data, the Xisha Islands and Nansha Islands are historically part of Chinese territory.”

Le Loc, Acting Director of the Asian Department of the Vietnamese Foreign Ministry, who was present, specifically cited Vietnamese data and pointed out that, “judging from history, these islands were already part of China at the time of the Song Dynasty.“ – China’s Foreign Ministry website, June 8, regarding the HYSY 981 drilling rig in the Xisha Islands.


2016-08-27 on spectator-new-www

The article cries out for a sequel, “Men who look great in bling”. Please, Spectator, make it happen!


2016-08-27 on fortruss

Maybe this is it: “Kiev has taken the decision to withdraw the notorious and scandal-prone “Azov special assignment regiment” from Mariupol and has begun to redeploy the militants to the Zaporozhye region.

Azov militants are furious at the decision of the National Guard of Ukraine’s command. They complain that they are being sent to inactive block posts and that Kiev is preparing to surrender Mariupol.” http://www.fort-russ.com/20…


2016-08-27 on nationalinterest

Precisely. But they never seem to learn..


2016-08-27 on nationalinterest

We must remember that we have yet to win our first war, unless you count Grenada. Russia and China have each won 20 major wars against fearsome foes unlike any we have even contemplated fighting. And both of them would be fighting defensive wars with short supply trains.

No, our real prowess lies in killing lightly- or unarmed civilians. We killed more French civilians than the Germans and are currently losing three wars, simultaneously, against lightly-armed civilians, whom we are killing with abandon. Starving civilians into submission (our strategy against Cuba, Iraq and many others) is unlikely to work in Russia or China.

The Chinese army, fighting on foreign soil, communicating with bugles, and lacking air cover, was able to roll us back to Korea’s 38th. parallel. Today China can prevent any approach via the Western Pacific with advanced weapons for which we have no answer. China’s manufacturing capacity is vastly bigger than ours, as are is its army and its economy and, though generals win battles, economies win wars.

There is no conceivable scenario in which we could defeat the Red Army, for reasons this video makes clear: https://www.youtube.com/wat…. Russia’s weapons are also more advanced and rugged than ours. Wars are won by skinny kids in ill-fitting uniforms who refuse to run away, and Russia’s has millions of them.

Both the Russian and Chinese publics would be 100% supportive of fighting us to the bitter end, while our home support for such madness would be around 20%.

It is time for our warmongers – who have predicted quick victories in all our lost wars – to sit down to a hearty meal of STFU.


2016-08-26 on nationalinterest

They all have radios, and that’s all they need.


2016-08-26 on nationalinterest

Johnson Reef was.


2016-08-24 on nationalinterest

China can deny access to US forces in the West Pacific whenever necessary. That horse has already left the barn. For the curious, search on the following (and on USN and Congressional reports thereon) weapons, several of which are far in advance of anything in the US arsenal:
DF-21D
DF-26D
West Pacific Surveillance and Targeting satellite
YJ-12
Song Type 039 ‘Black Hole’
Type 65 wake-homing torpedoes
Yu-8
J-20 and J-31 fighters vs. F-35 and F-22
S-400
DF-ZF Prompt Global Strike
200,000 ocean-going fishing boats and 4,000 ocean freighters, all members of China’s merchant marine, manned by experienced sailors and equipped with direct communication links to the PLA Navy and tasked with reporting the movements of all combatants 24×7.


2016-08-24 on theasanforum

‘He predicts that China’s power will match that of the United States in ten years’. That long?
I’m not a military expert but it appears that China can exclude the US from the Western Pacific tomorrow, if it wishes. Though US defence authorities and numerous Congressional panels have made public their concerns about China’s weapons buildup, no-one has publicly put the pieces together, as far as I know.
Anyone interested can check out China’s remarkable defensive suite, of which this is only a partial list:
DF-21D
DF-26D
West Pacific Surveillance and Targeting satellite
YJ-12
Song Type 039 ‘Black Hole’
Type 65 wake-homing torpedoes
Yu-8
J-20 and J-31 fighters vs. F-35 and F-22
S-400
DF-ZF Prompt Global Strike
200,000 ocean-going fishing boats and 4,000 ocean freighters, all members of China’s merchant marine, manned by experienced sailors and equipped with direct communication links to the PLA Navy and tasked with reporting the movements of all combatants 24×7.


2016-08-24 on theasanforum

You, the editors, speak of Occupied Japan and Occupied Korea as though they were independent actors. They are not, as you and the world well knows.
You cannot support this ridiculous fiction and hope to be taken seriously – even though those who fund you demand it.
Your loyalty clearly lies with them, not us, which means that you will make yourselves irrelevant and, like the New York Times, be deserted and even detested by once-loyal readers.


2016-08-23 on nationalinterest

My apologies. In 2015, the United States imported approximately 9.4 million barrels per day (MMb/d) of petroleum from about 82 countries for a total of 3.4 billion barrels, and consumed a total of 7.08 billion barrels of petroleum products, an average of about 19.4 million barrels per day. (EIA)
The correct figure is 48%.


2016-08-22 on nationalinterest

65% of our energy is imported.


2016-08-22 on bloombergview

Yeah, yeah. And the Shanghai Index will, once again, beat the DJI by 10% this year and every year for the next 20.


2016-08-21 on nationalinterest

No, I’m not employed by the USN or any of its contractors and I think their budget is adequate. Indeed, the bulk of the US military procurement budget for the next 20 years is devoted to Naval acquisitions, perhaps because individual vessels have become so expensive. By the time the Gerald Ford is accepted into the fleet it will have cost close to $20 billion. And the acquisition program seems to be for more of the same.

There appears to be a technology-driven power shift from naval offense to shore-based defense. Large surface combatants are becoming obsolete (unless the USN plans to re-fight the Battle of Jutland or the Battle of the Coral Sea) as land-based anti-ship missile systems become more competent. Even if none of the new Chinese systems has been combat-tested, no admiral is going to risk the Gerald Ford to test their efficacy). The downside of capital ships is not only the potential loss of resources but the potential loss of face, of credibility (as the sinking of the HMS Hood demonstrated). Big ships are becoming show ponies, good for Fleet Day but little else.

I’m not encouraged by the newest acquisitions, either. The LCS seems to be a bust and the F35C appears to have a very short range and unimpressive payload – utterly incapable of attacking Chinese targets. There’s lots of talk, as there always is, about new systems but I struggle to recall one in the last 20 years that’s been produced in quantity and that represents a threat to China. Do you know of any that are close to production?

Meanwhile, the Chinese launched three nuclear submarines within a month and half a dozen Arleigh Burke class destroyers in as many years, demonstrating (very deliberately, I think) that they can out-manufacture us any time. As military professionals are always reminding civilians like me, logistics is the key to war fighting, and China’s logistics – at least on the production end – are markedly superior.

Beyond that, China’s economy is much bigger than ours and growing four times faster – and though commanders and fleets win battles, economies win wars.


2016-08-21 on nationalinterest

Its fishing fleet is a fishing fleet. The fishermen report suspicious activity.
China is not involved in ‘military aggression’ and has not seen combat for 40 years. Can you name another power with that record?


2016-08-21 on nationalinterest

I don’t think war between them is remotely likely, especially when you see the rest of China’s arsenal.

More likely is a nutty Japanese attack on something of value to the Chinese.

That would suit the Chinese: they’d destroy every Japanese military base west of Guam, knowing there’s no chance the USA would risk nuclear war by retaliating.

That would be the end of both the Japanese nuisance and the US as world hegemon.

The US values Japan as a nuisance for China but, if you watch closely, you’ll see the US trying to prevent precisely this scenario.


2016-08-21 on nationalinterest

Do you know anything about the Chinese arsenal? Anything at all? Or are you just another troll? Here’s a small sample of their operational weapons systems in the SCS:

1. DF21D: The US Naval Institute says it could destroy an aircraft carrier in one strike and that there is currently no defense against it. Its bigger brother, the DF-26D, carries 3,000 lb. of high explosive 2,000 miles.

2. 200,000 ocean-going fishing boats and 4,000 ocean freighters, all members of China’s merchant marine, manned by experienced sailors and equipped with direct communication links to the PLA Navy and tasked with reporting the movements of all combatants 24×7. Larger vessels have sonar for undersea surveillance.

3. West Pacific Surveillance and Targeting satellite which – with the assistance of 12 BeiDou positioning, navigation, and timing satellites – tracks everything that moves in the SCS with 10 cm. accuracy.

4. China Commercial Remote-sensing Satellite System (CCRSS), a hyperspectral, real-time submarine detection, classification, and identification device that peers beneath the waves.

5. The YJ-12 anti-ship cruise missile. A Congressional report says, “The new missile provides an increased threat to naval assets due to its long range and supersonic speed.” According to the Naval War College Review, at 200-miles, the YJ-12 is the longest-ranged anti-ship cruise missile ever fielded, allowing aircraft to launch outside the range of the Aegis Combat System and surface-to-air missiles protecting carrier groups.

6. Song Type 039 submarines. USN experts talk about the Song’s threat to U.S. Aircraft carriers because it has so often avoided detection by US carrier escorts. There have been numerous instances of American carrier groups being surprised by Songs at sea, most famously in 2006, when a Song surfaced within firing range of the Kitty Hawk battle group. Critics point out that if a relatively inferior sub like the Song is able to penetrate the carrier’s screen, the more capable Kilo class would find the feat even easier.

7. China’s fleet of 83 Type 22 patrol ships, only 140 ft long but capable of 40 mph in heavy seas, operate within its littoral zone and each carries eight C-802 anti-ship missiles. Due to its small radar reflectivity, low attack flight path (15-20 ft above the surface) and powerful anti-jamming ability, target ships have little chance of intercepting the C-802 with its 650 mph speed, 500 lb. warhead and 200 mile range.

8. The antisubmarine Yu-8, is a torpedo-carrying missile that vastly expands the range and speed of the torpedo. The missile carries the torpedo twenty miles at 650 mph (it can receive two targeting updates in flight) then releases its torpedo that can track targets at 2 miles. It can be launched by China’s Type 052 destroyers and other warships. It’s unlikely, according to US naval observers, that the weapon would be detected by a submerged submarine until it had plunged at high speed into the water close to the submarine, limiting the sub crew’s time for evasive action and countermeasures.

There are seven more weapons systems, including seabed passive sonar arrays, along with Arleigh Burke class destroyers, missile frigates…the list goes on.

Learn before you troll.


2016-08-20 on theaviationist

Do I understand correctly? US warplanes were in Syrian airspace without Syrian authorization?
Those US warplanes ordered Syrian warplanes to leave Syrian airspace?
WTF?


2016-08-20 on nationalinterest

China is luring the US into an arms race its already stretched budget cannot afford. We’re already spending 52% of our national revenue on arms and still losing three wars. The Chinese missile arsenal, including such doozies as the YJ-12 and the DF-ZF are far in advance of anything in our arsenal.


2016-08-18 on russiainsider

‘Chinese media claimed that five members of the Falun Gong sect had set themselves afire in Tiennamen Square.’
If Chinese media said so, then it’s probably true. According to Gallup’s and Edelman’s surveys, Chinese media is 400% more trustworthy that American media. And Falun Gong are nuts, seriously crazy.


2016-08-18 on wsws

Bear in mind Australia’s FM Julie Bishop’s public statement last year that “the only language the Chinese understand is force” (when China has not used force anywhere since rescuing Cambodia nearly 40 years ago – while the US has attacked 31 countries in that interval.

But the US is already outmanned and outgunned in the West Pacific unless, of course, China plans to re-fight the Battle of Jutland or the Battle of the Coral Sea. China can do far more damage to the US Navy from land, sea and space than the US Navy can do to China from the sea. The game there is essentially over.


2016-08-18 on wsws

And China has upped its profile there, sending ‘advisors’, money and materiel. The tide in the ME seems to be turning.


2016-08-12 on asiatimes

‘RAND knows a direct US-China war could plausibly blow up into a nuclear confrontation but is cynically carrying water for the Navy and Air Force in their desire to fund an epic conventional buildup around the PRC.’
Well put. It’s a money game until, of course, it becomes a shooting game.


2016-08-11 on in-focus

‘At Mainland China university, students work like slaves or more like prisoners. Serious academic corruption, dry and irrelevant to society curriculum, and rote memorization teaching methods were leading to students developing rigid ways of thinking, progressively losing interest in learning and ultimately emerging from university as soulless zombies.’ What counterfactual drivel! Does the photographer work for the NED?

Thanks to its universities, China is the world leader in soft disciplines like economics, governance, education and criminology.

And in hard technologies like Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-Flight Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Hyperspectral Imaging, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Radiotelescopy, Hypersonic Space Weapons and Satellite Quantum Communications.

If there are rigid ways of thinking, look West, young man.


2016-08-11 on asiatimes

Where’s the proof of charges like “A second major success was the theft of technology related to the Navy’s Aegis battle management system, built around a high-technology radar that allows warships to track targets ranging from space to on land thousands of miles away.Chinese agents stole the Aegis technology in the late 1990s and early 2000s and quickly adapted the system to Chinese advanced warships’?
It would be quicker and cheaper to license such technologies from Russia – as China does regularly.


2016-08-09 on dezeenhq

This is the same guy who went to the Sichuan earthquake site, stayed in the only hotel still standing then, three weeks later, announced that thousands of children had been killed because corrupt contractors had built schools cheaply.

He then departed to accept an award from a German charity. Of course, given the staggering scale of the disaster, it took teams of engineers, demographers and statisticians almost two years to present a comprehensive final report which, inter alia, showed that cheap, shoddy construction of public buildings constructed in the 80s was even then acknowledged as ‘better than working in caves with damp walls’. The death rate from collapsing schools was below the average for all institutional buildings in the quake area.

For his next act, he claimed to have designed the Beijing Birds Nest which, as Dezeen readers probably know, is a flat out lie: he had nothing to do with it.


2016-08-09 on nationalinterest

Instead of waving your hands and breathing heavily, why not directly address a few of my points? Why do you not enter into the discussion? Why do you not substantiate anything you say? What are you afraid of?


2016-08-09 on nationalinterest

Then why don’t you disprove some – or even one – of my claims? Show me up as a liar and a faker?

In the meantime, here’s some bedtime reading that’ll help you catch up with what’s been happening in the 21st. century:

Graphenics: http://investorintel.com/ra…

‘Clean’ nuclear power from thorium. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/…

Missiles. The Dongfeng-41 (DF-41, CSS-X-10) (Chinese: 东风-41; literally: “East Wind-41”), is a Chinese nuclear solid-fueled road-mobile intercontinental ballistic missile.

It has an operational range between 12,000 km to 15,000 km. This would make the DF-41 the world’s longest range missile, surpassing the range of the US LGM-30 Minuteman which has a reported range of 13,000 km.[unreliable source?] It is believed to have a top speed of Mach 25, and to be capable of MIRV delivery (up to 10). https://en.wikipedia.org/wi…

High Temperature Pebble Bed Nuclear Reactors. In what would be a milestone for advanced nuclear power, China’s Nuclear Engineering Construction Corporation plans to start up a high-temperature, gas-cooled pebble-bed nuclear reactor in Shandong province, south of Beijing, late next year. Examples of the so-called Generation IV reactors that go beyond today’s conventional reactor technology, the twin 105-megawatt reactors would be the first of their type built at commercial scale in the world. https://www.technologyrevie…

Genomics. China leads the world, according to the National Institutes of Health. http://www.healthdatamanage…

Power generation (Duke Energy licenses their thermal power technology from China) http://online.wsj.com/artic…

Supercomputing. http://www.forbes.com/sites…

http://www.nextplatform.com… “Chinese systems vendor, Sugon, has now overtaken IBM on the Top 500“

Quantum Communication Network . http://www.scmp.com/tech/sc…

Quantum communications Satellites: https://www.rt.com/news/328…. http://www.china.org.cn/bus… .

Quantum Entanglement: https://www.technologyrevie…

Missiles. http://missilethreat.com/mi…

UAVs It would appear that both China’s Global Hawk like HALE UAV and Predator B like designs are actually more advanced in aerodynamically than their approximate American equivalents. http://aviationintel.com/ch…

Naval Guns http://www.wantchinatimes.c…

Passive Array Radar. http://chinadailymail.com/2…

Metamaterials. http://www.wantchinatimes.c…

Hyperspectral Imaging: China To Launch The World’s Most Powerful Hyperspectral Satellite | Popular Science.

Nanotechnology. China leads the world in the number of nanotechnology patents. http://www.china.org.cn/opi…

Suzhou’s Nanopolis is the world’s biggest multi-functional nanotech industrial community and is currently generating 20.4 billion RMB annually from the 120 corporations operating within its campus. http://daxueconsulting.com/…

UHV Electricity transmission: http://www.wantchinatimes.c…

Electric Vehicles: http://reneweconomy.com.au/…

http://www.zmescience.com/e…


2016-08-09 on nationalinterest

Why not address my claims? Prove them false? Be a hero?

As I said, Have you ever contributed anything to a conversation? Or do prefer to simply insult people who do? Or is that not a preference? It it all you’re capable of?


2016-08-08 on ceprnet

And China’s new VAT applies to financial transactions, too, which should be interesting.


2016-08-08 on nationalinterest

Have you ever contributed anything to a conversation? Or do prefer to simply insult people who do? Or is that not a preference? It it all you’re capable of?


2016-08-08 on nationalinterest

‘China has made an advance payment under a contract made public in April 2015 for the procurement of four to six Russian-made S-400 Triumph (NATO reporting name: SA-21 Growler) missile defense systems, Rostec CEO Sergei Chemezov said in an interview with TASS.’http://thediplomat.com/2016…

There always seems to be back-and-forth announcements for sales of super weapons like the S400. I guess we’ll just have to wait and see what is delivered…


2016-08-08 on nationalinterest

As with its high speed rail technology, China paid Russia handsomely for the rights to manufacture its weapons systems, and still does. Russian manufacturers have complained about ‘theft’ but that’s because the Federal government didn’t give them a share of the license fees – contending that the money was a return on the government’s investments in the industry. On that basis, Russia has agreed to sell its S-400 AAAM systems and its current fighters to China, too.
China’s indigenously developed weapons systems are world beaters: the DF21D and DF61D are unique and original, as are its Prompt Global Strike system and its hyperspectral imaging satellites. Better yet, like the J-20, they’re all operational.
Beyond military technology, China also leads the world in Supercomputing, Speech Recognition, Graphenics, Thorium power, Pebble Bed Reactors, Genomics, Thermal Power generation, Quantum Communication Networks, ASW Missiles, In-Flight Satellite Refueling, Passive Array Radar, Metamaterials, Nanotechnology, UHV Electricity transmission, Electric Vehicles, High Speed Rail, Radiotelescopy and Satellite Quantum Communications.
And that’s just the stuff we know about.


2016-08-07 on nationalinterest

Before we pat ourselves on the back, let’s wait for the other shoe to drop: the terms of the agreement between China and the Philippines. The fat lady hasn’t sung yet.


2016-08-04 on lowyinterpreter

The writer appears to be unfamiliar with contemporary China, given that almost every aspect of its governance and economy is public information and that the information has proven remarkably reliable for 40 years. Let’s pass over the usual trope about the opaque promotion methods of ‘faceless grey Communist technocrats’ – which are anything but – and look at a few more obvious clangers:

1. ‘On economic growth, Xi has done worse than all of his predecessors at least since the early 1980s’? Really? Let’s look at the best five years aggregate growth (constant dollars, PPP) under recent presidents:
Xi = $7 trillion
Hu = $5 trillion
Jiang = $3 trillion.

2. ‘China is a less dynamic and growing more slowly than at any stage since the early reform era after 1978’? Really? China’s economy is growing exponentially and Chinese real wages are doubling every ten years. Every Chinese will be twice as productive this year as he was in 2006 (constant dollars, PPP). And Xi is laying the foundation for them to be twice as productive ten years hence. A Western leader who delivered results like that – and none ever has – would be deified.

3. The Chinese ‘will prove impatient with excuses and finger pointing, and want to hear a positive vision of where China is heading; something more than just abstract musings on China dreams and grand visions’. Really? Xi not only renewed Deng’s call for a Xiaokang society – one with general peace and prosperity built on a just legal order with sound moral foundations – he even set a delivery date: 2020. If he can lift 11 million more people out of poverty each year for the next 5 years (and I’m betting he can) China will be free of poverty for the first time in 5,000 years.

4. ‘Even though China is clearly not a democracy’. It’s a damn sight more democratic that the USA. 83 percent of Chinese say their country is run for everyone’s benefit rather than for a few big interest groups, whereas only 36 percent of Americans thought the same of their country. http://www.wvsevsdb.com/wvs….

We see the opposite is true. “The central point that emerges from our research is that economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on U.S. government policy while mass-based interest groups and average citizens have little or no independent influence.” [“Testing Theories of American Politics,” by Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page in Perspectives on Politics, The American Political Science Association September 2014]. http://journals.cambridge.o… : As

Gilens told the online journal Talking Points Memo two years ago, “ordinary citizens have virtually no influence over what their government does in the United States.” And: “CNN: 13% of Americans say the government can be trusted to do what is right always or most of the time”. http://politicalticker.blog….


2016-08-02 on nationalinterest

A slightly unrealistic prediction. A military that has never won a war and is today losing three concurrently (surely a world record for incompetence) attacking a nation that’s won hundreds, has a much larger economy, vastly stronger manufacturing sector, a much larger population that’s more willing to fight, a military willing to take losses, that’s capable of sinking any ship within 2,000 miles and of bringing down any aircraft within 500. I think not.


2016-08-01 on russiainsider

I’m not sure that reason will prevail. Usually its force of arms that prevails then ‘reason’ is used to create the backstory.
I, too, have been trying to think of a forum like the one you envisage. The best I can imagine is The Two Sides News – a daily version of Google News, with two columns, with the Western narrative on the right (natch) and the Eurasian version on the left. That way nobody can accuse you of being unbalanced or biased.

Want to try starting it?


2016-08-01 on russiainsider

Agreed. Wikipedia has become a tragedy. I suspect that Jimmy Wales is actually OK with that, too. It’s a powerful medium and it appears he’s been coopted by the establishment.


2016-08-01 on nationalinterest

I appreciate your point of view but it appears that you have only examined one side of the story. I’m familiar with the Western narrative you recount and I find it no more convincing than other Western narratives like Iraq’s WMD or Russia’s ‘invasion’ of Ukraine.
If you’re to discuss this usefully you have to study the other side of the story.


2016-07-31 on russiainsider

I’m amazed that we really do have a propaganda ministry that employs people to spread lies and suppress different opinions. To me it smacks of desperation: why would they bother unless they’re afraid that the dominant narrative is is failing – which, according to Gallup’s June survey on US Govt. and institutional approval – it is. So desperate, in fact, that they do this: http://www.zerohedge.com/ne….


2016-07-31 on nationalinterest

“Go and live in these commie states and learn. I have lived the experience for many years.” Which Commie states have you lived in? Do tell.

The most successful state on earth, China, is Commie, and the biggest failure is democratic, India. State success depends on the competence and honesty of the governing elite rather than its political philosophy.

You are recounting Western media ‘imaginary atrocity stories’. Our media have been running them since the beginning of time while downplaying real Western atrocities like the firebombing of Korea.

After recent examples like Iraq’s fictitious “WMDs” and Russia’s non-existent “invasion” of Ukraine surely it’s time to look more critically at what our media tells you.


2016-07-31 on nationalinterest

If the Soviets wanted to expand the sphere of communist influence into Korea, why did they leave?
Because the USSR signed a treaty to leave the Korean peninsula and kept their word. The USA refused to sign and retains an army of occupation there to this day.
You seem to think that stopping the spread of Communism is a good thing. Why?


2016-07-30 on nationalinterest

The Korean War itself grew out of U.S. refusal to allow a genuine self-determination process to take root. The Korean people were exuberant in August 1945 with their new freedom after being subjected to a brutal 40-year Japanese occupation of their historically undivided Peninsula. They immediately began creating local democratic peoples’ committees the day after Japan announced on August 14 its intentions to surrender. By August 28, all Korean provinces had created local peoples’ offices and on September 6 delegates from throughout the Peninsula gathered in Seoul, at which time they created the Korean People’s Republic (KPR).

The United States had a different plan for Korea. At the February 1945 Yalta conference, President Roosevelt suggested to Stalin, without consulting the Koreans, that Korea should be placed under joint trusteeship following the war before being granted her independence. On August 11, two days after the second atomic bomb was dropped assuring Japan’s imminent surrender, and three days after Russian forces entered Manchuria and Korea to oust the Japanese as was agreed to avoid further U.S. casualties, Truman hurriedly ordered his War Department to choose a dividing line for Korea. Two young colonels, Dean Rusk (later to be Secretary of State under President’s Kennedy and Johnson during the Vietnam War) and Charles H. Bonesteel, were given 30 minutes to resolve the matter. The 38th parallel was quickly, and quietly, chosen, placing the historic capital city of Seoul and 70 percent, or 21 of Korea’s 30 million people in the “American” southern zone. This was not discussed with Stalin or any other political leaders in the U.S. or among our allies. Surprisingly, Stalin agreed to this “temporary” partition that meant the Russians already present in the country would briefly occupy the territory north of the line comprising 55 percent of the peninsular land area. On August 15, the United States Army Military Government in Korea (USAMGIK) was formed and on September 8, 72,000 U.S. troops began arriving to enforce the formal occupation of the south.

The Korean People’s Republic officially formed just two days prior to the first arrival of U.S. forces was almost immediately shunned by the U.S. who decided its preference was to stand behind conservative politicians representing the traditional land-owning elite. The U.S. helped in the formation on September 16 of the conservative Korean Democratic Party (KDP), and brought Syngman Rhee to Korea on General MacArthur’s plane on October 16 to head up the new party. Rhee, a Korean possessing a Ph.D. from Princeton (1910) and an Austrian wife, had lived in the United States for more than 40 years. To his credit he had detested the Japanese occupation of his native country, but he hated the communists even more. Just before Rhee arrived to begin efforts to consolidate his power in the south, long-time resistance fighter Kim Il Sung returned from exile to begin his leadership in the Russian occupied north. As a guerrilla leader Kim had been fighting the Japanese occupation of China and Korea since the early 1930s.

Rhee and his U.S. advisers quickly concluded that in order to build their kind of Korea through the KDP they must definitively defeat the broad-based KPR. While Kim, with the support of the Russian forces in the north, was purging that territory of former Japanese administrators and their Korean collaborators, the USAMG was actively recruiting them in the south. In November the U.S. Military Governor outlawed all strikes and in December declared the KPR and all its activities illegal. In effect the U.S. had declared war on the popular movement of Korea south of the 38th Parallel and set in motion a repressive campaign that later became excessively brutal, dismantling the Peoples’ Committees and their supporters throughout the south.

In December 1945 General John R. Hodge, commander of the U.S. occupation forces, created the Korean Constabulary, led exclusively by officers who had served the Japanese. Along with the revived Japanese colonial police force, the Korean National Police (KNP), comprised of many former Korean collaborators, and powerful right-wing paramilitary groups like the Korean National Youth and the Northwest Youth League, the U.S.Military Government and their puppet Syngman Rhee possessed the armed instruments of a police state more than able to assure a political system that was determined to protect the old landlord class made up of rigid reactionaries and enthusiastic capitalists.

By the fall of 1946, disgruntled workers declared a strike that spread throughout South Korea. By December the combination of the KNP, the Constabulary, and the right-wing paramilitary units, supplemented by U.S. firepower and intelligence, had contained the insurrections in all provinces. More than 1,000 Koreans were killed with more than 30,000 jailed. Regional and local leaders of the popular movement were either dead, in jail, or driven underground.

With total U.S. support Rhee busily prepared for a politically division of Korea involuntarily imposed on the vast majority of the Korean people. Following suppression of the October-December insurrection, the Koreans began to form guerrilla units in early 1947. There were sporadic activities for a year or so. However, in March 1948, on Korea’s large Island, Cheju, a demonstration objecting to Rhee’s planned separate elections scheduled for May 1948 was fired upon by the KNP. A number of Koreans were injured and several were tortured, then killed. This incident provoked a dramatic escalation of armed resistance to the U.S./Rhee regime. The police state went into full force, regularly guided by U.S. military advisors, and often supported by U.S. military firepower and occasional ground troops. On the Island of Cheju alone, within a year as many as 60,000 of its 300,000 residents had been murdered, while another 40,000 fled by sea to nearby Japan. Over 230 of the Island’s 400 villages had been totally scorched with 40,000 homes burned to the ground. As many as 100,000 people were herded into government compounds. The remainder, it has been reported, became collaborators in order to survive. On the mainland guerrilla activities escalated in most of the provinces. The Rhee/U.S. forces conducted a ruthless campaign of cleansing the south of all dissidents, usually identifying them as “communists,” though in fact most popular leaders in the south were socialists unaffiliated with outside “communist” organizations. Anyone who was openly or quietly opposed to the Rhee regime was considered suspect. Therefore massive numbers of villagers and farmers were systematically rounded up, tortured, then shot and dropped into mass graves. Estimates of murdered civilians range anywhere from 200,000 to 800,000 by the time the hot war broke out in June 1950.

The hot war allegedly began at Ongjin about 3 or 4 A.M. (Korean time) June 25, 1950. Just how the fighting started on that day depends on one’s source of information. It is mostly irrelevant, since a civil and revolutionary war had been raging for a couple of years, with military incursions routinely moving back and forth across the 38th parallel.

The Korean war was a rehearsal for the Vietnam war in almost every respect, except that we hung onto the South in Korea and have been able – at the point of 37,000 US guns – to control the narrative there. We lost the war in Vietnam and have found it more difficult to control that narrative.

I moved into the men’s graduate student dorm in the Winter of 1967. I was warmly hosted at many of the student’s families’ homes. Most parents were upper middle class, since Korea was still far too poor to afford the educational opportunities available today. Street beggars were everywhere.

My student friends would have been 10-12 years old when the war ended, yet their accounts jibed with their parents’: they regarded the Northern troops as liberators and spoke with horror of the USAF firebombing of their homes and the rapes and murders we perpetrated.: See A Forgotten Holocaust: US Bombing Strategy: http://www.japanfocus.org/-Mar…. WE may have forgotten the holocaust, thanks to our media’s filter system, but the Koreans certainly have not.

For an accurate, well-documented account of that war, read ‘The Hidden History of the Korean War, 1950-1951, by IF Stone. http://www.amazon.com/Hidden-H…. Stone was the pre-eminent investigative reporter of that era and his research is impeccable.

To understand how this narrative has been sustained for over 50 years read ‘The Propaganda Model: An Overview, by David Cromwell’, free at Page on www.chomsky.info.


2016-07-29 on russiainsider

I’ve been actively posting on China for years and have encountered the same pattern and tactics. I have been surprised by the professionalism of the operations and the ability of the anti-China crowd to escalate an exchange by calling in reinforcements to join their attacks.


2016-07-29 on nationalinterest

‘The Korean War began when North Korea invaded South Korea.’
Korea is one country: it cannot invade itself. The US did actually invade Korea, killed millions – just like Vietnam – installed a brutal dictatorship, an occupying army, began a siege to starve the north into submission and accused the north of having a brutal dictatorship.

You seem to feel that overthrowing or preventing Communist government justifies torturing and killing millions of people. Cuba, for example, has the highest standard of living in Latin America. China’s standard of living is vastly higher than India’s, even though India was richer than China after the War.

Your ‘free’ world is a brutal, undemocratic oligarchy that has brought misery and exploitation to the less- and un-developed world (the vast majority of humanity) for 70 years and continues to do so today everywhere from Honduras to Ukraine.


2016-07-28 on nationalinterest

I’m shocked! Shocked that China should lag so far behind the US in its foreign relations. Here’s a list of America’s soft power in action: its bombing list
* Korea and China 1950-53 (Korean War)
* Guatemala 1954
* Indonesia 1958
* Cuba 1959-1961
* Guatemala 1960
* Congo 1964
* Laos 1964-73
* Vietnam 1961-73
* Cambodia 1969-70
* Guatemala 1967-69
* Grenada 1983
* Lebanon 1983, 1984 (both Lebanese and Syrian targets)
* Libya 1986
* El Salvador 1980s
* Nicaragua 1980s
* Iran 1987
* Panama 1989
* Iraq 1991 (Persian Gulf War)
* Kuwait 1991
* Somalia 1993
* Bosnia 1994, 1995
* Sudan 1998
* Afghanistan 1998
* Yugoslavia 1999
* Yemen 2002
* Iraq 1991-2003
* Iraq 2003-2015
* Afghanistan 2001-2015
* Pakistan 2007-2015
* Somalia 2007-8, 2011
* Yemen 2009, 2011
* Libya 2011, 2015
* Syria 2014-2015

And, lest we forget..
* Iran, April 2003 – hit by US missiles during bombing of Iraq, killing at least one person
* Pakistan, 2002-03 – bombed by US planes several times as part of combat against the Taliban and other opponents of the US occupation of Afghanistan
* China, 1999 – its heavily bombed embassy in Belgrade is legally Chinese territory and was no accident.
* France, 1986 – After the French government refused the use of its air space to US warplanes headed for a bombing raid on Libya, the planes were forced to take another, longer route; when they reached Libya they bombed so close to the French embassy that the building was damaged and all communication links knocked out.


2016-07-28 on nationalinterest

No they haven’t Fred. You’ve been watching too much Fox News. Those are old, recycled atrocity stories. Per capita,China has one of the lowest prison populations on earth and goes to extreme lengths to keep it that way. If you want to see millions of people – today – being murdered in the streets and imprisoned by millions, visit the good ‘ol US of A. That’s where the action is.


2016-07-28 on nationalinterest

Tibet never was a ‘country’. It was never recognized as such by anyone. The Dalai Lama claims half of China, as ‘Greater Tibet’. He certainly doesn’t see much separation. It’s just a squabble over who’s in charge.


2016-07-24 on nknews

The UN blessed the torture of Iraq and the murder of hundreds of thousands of Iraqi children. It’s just another Western front.


2016-07-23 on washtimes

Beijing’s rationale is fundamentally different from the US’s: The People’s Republic is the successor to the Chinese imperial Qing dynasty. For a long time, China was weak, and the British seized Hong Kong, forced the Treaty Ports system on China, and sold opium to the Chinese. Because the central government was weak, it was unable to protect the interests of the Chinese people for nearly 200 years.

Following the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949, then China’s reforms in 1979, China now has the second largest economy in the world. In order to help China’s rejuvenation, the central government exercised control over Hong Kong in 1997 and over Macau in 1999.

The exercise of these claims in the South China Sea is simply the central government in Beijing re-exercising control over islands which Beijing was previously too weak to control. Following WWII, the US Navy patrolled the South China Sea because China was too weak.

In imperial times, what are now Vietnam and the Philippines were all Chinese tributary states. They would all offer gifts to the Chinese emperor every year, and the Chinese emperor would let them run their countries as they saw fit. The Chinese always allowed free trade and transport in the region.

China is now saying that since it is back and is powerful again, it is natural that it will make moves to restore its control over lands and seas it considers to be its own territory. What appears to Americans as a suddenly aggressive move really should not be considered as such. The US should have expected this to happen ever since China’s economy started to take off. It was only a question of when it would happen. Paul Denlinger. https://www.quora.com


2016-07-20 on chinalawblog

‘All of them can to at least some extent be traced to the downturn in China’s economy.’
There isn’t and hasn’t been a downturn in China’s economy for 30 years and none is on the horizon, so the problem must be that foreign companies’ share of national markets and profits is under pressure because more Chinese firms have developed or acquired advanced technology (Kuka) and famous brands (Volvo). Frankly, I’m surprised and impressed that any foreign firm can make a decent profit in that cutthroat environment.


2016-07-19 on nationalinterest

“China’s next aggressive move”? Aggresive? Seriously? Let’s go to the tape:

How many bombing sorties did China’s air force fly? Did they institute a no fly zone?

How many combatants did China kill?

How many civilians did China kill? How many as side effects of drone attacks?

How many captured civilians did China torture?

How many of China’s captives are still imprisoned without charge or trial?

How may people were wounded?

How much land did China illegally take? From whom?

What losses have China’s victims suffered?

Who are we kidding calling China’s behavior ‘aggressive’? What hypocrisy!


2016-07-18 on nationalinterest

Great article, as always. A few niggles: “Obviously, the above [China’s enumeration of missile eployment options] suggests tremendous potential for dangerous misunderstanding and escalation!”. There is no ambiguity whatever. China’s message is perfectly clear.
And as to Xi’s needing bread and circuses to distract the Chinese from their economic woes? Stick to defense analysis: By the end of this year China’s economy will be 30% bigger than ours and growing exponentially.


2016-07-18 on nationalinterest

China has always been ‘viewed negatively’ by the West – but not by Chinese, 90% of whom support its policies and 80% of whom trust it.

What good, precisely, have ‘International standards’ done?
Did they prevent our invasions of Vietnam, Iraq, Syria, Libya, or our resort to torture and assassination? International standards indeed, sir! Poppycock, sir! Balderdash!


2016-07-18 on nationalinterest

Thanks to the interwebs, we don’t have to make sweeping statements like, “A majority of Chinese tourists are detested by host countries” and hope that people believe us. We can now use links to demonstrate that we’ve at least got some solid evidence to back up our claims.

Like this: US eager to cater to Chinese tourists – The Hour. https://www.google.co.th/ur…

And

Turkey aims to woo 1 million Chinese this year. https://www.google.co.th/ur…

And

Nepal eager to welcome Chinese tourists. https://www.google.co.th/ur…

And, of course, this:

Dutch Museums Trying to Attract More Chinese Tourists. https://www.google.co.th/ur…

And my personal favorite, The world is trying to win Chinese tourists. https://www.google.co.th/ur…

It’s that easy!


2016-07-18 on nationalinterest

I did not infer that China is the Philippines’ biggest beneficiary, or did I state it or hint at it. I don’t know the details of the two countries’ relationship. I simply pointed out that the Philippines needs three things – tourism immediately, finance and infrastructure. And we all know that China is the biggest producer of all three. I inferred that the two countries have well-matched needs – the essence of a win-win solution.


2016-07-17 on nationalinterest

Do you ever actually contribute to discussions or do you specialize in empty ad hominem?
Inquiring minds want to know…


2016-07-16 on asiatimes

Agreed. Now…enter China and Russia bearing pipelines, security pacts and high speed rail connections. Turkey is Eurasia’s swing state…


2016-07-16 on asiatimes

If you’re right, then we can expect Turkey to join the Eurasian Coalition – China, Russia, et al. – and drift away from NATO and the EU membership fantasy.

When you look at it that way you can see why Turkey really is a pivotal state: politically and geographically.


2016-07-16 on nationalinterest

Carpio has been in speaking circles in the past couple of years to present his own research on the Philippines’s own historical claims over Scarborough Shoal or Panatag. “China’s claim to a ‘historical right’ to the waters enclosed within the nine-dash lines in the South China Sea is utterly without basis under international law,” Carpio said in March 2014 speech for the Philippine Women’s Judges Association.

Just the right guy to talk to the Chinese!


2016-07-16 on nationalinterest

I agree. Mr. Ramos’ upcoming visit will tell us more…


2016-07-16 on nationalinterest

‘All superpowers usually ignore international verdicts’