More on negative Chinese stereotypes

I talk with a guy who knows British race and intelligence researcher Richard Lynn, who prophesized back in 2001 in a book on eugenics that China will, with a combination of high IQ, size (both in land mass and population), and authoritarian government, eventually rule the world. I asked him what he thinks about that. His response was:

Chinese deeply incompetent and bad personality for innovation. But maybe if Western keeps importing blacks and Muslims…
It’s a good question and important

For more context on Lynn, I’ll copy directly from his book.

The nations of East Asia are likely to develop their economic, scientific, technological, and military strength during the twenty-first century by virtue of the high intelligence levels of their populations and the absence of any serious dysgenic processes. These countries have not allowed the growth of an underclass with high dysgenic fertility, and they have not permitted dysgenic immigration. China will continue its rapid economic development and will emerge as a new superpower in the early middle decades of the twentyfirst century. Chinese economic, scientific, and military strength is likely to be increased by the further development of the eugenic programs introduced in the 1980s and 1990s and particularly by the introduction of the new eugenics of embryo selection and the cloning of elites. As the power of the United States declines, China and Europe will emerge as the two superpowers. A global conflict will develop between them in which Europe will become progressively weakened by dysgenic forces and China progressively strengthened by eugenic programs. This conflict will eventually be won by China, which will use its power to assume control of the world and to establish a world state. This event will become known as “the end of history.” Once China has established a world state, it can be expected to administer this on the same lines as former colonial empires by appointing Chinese governors and senior military and administrative support staff in charge of the provinces of its world empire or by allowing nationals of its subject peoples to administer the provinces under Chinese supervision. The establishment of a Chinese world state will inevitably not be welcomed by the peoples of the rest of the world, who will become colonized populations governed by an oligarchy based in Beijing. There will be no democracy, and a number of freedoms will be curtailed, including freedom to publish seditious material and to have unlimited numbers of children. There will, however, be certain compensating benefits. There will be no more wars between independent nation states with the attendant dangers of the use of nuclear weapons and biological warfare. It will be possible to deal with the problems of dysgenic fertility, global warming, deforestation, the population explosion in the developing world, the AIDS epidemic, and similar global problems that cannot be tackled effectively in a world of independent nation states. Among the world state’s first objectives will be the reversal of dysgenic processes and the introduction of eugenic programs throughout the world. Over the longer term the world state will set up research and development programs for the use of genetic engineering to improve the human genome and to produce a new human species able to solve hitherto unsolvable problems and to colonize new planets. This will be the ultimate achievement of Galton’s vision of using eugenics to replace natural selection with consciously designed human selection.

This scenario for the twenty-first century, in which China assumes world domination and establishes a world eugenic state, may well be considered an unattractive future. But this is not really the point. Rather, it should be regarded as the inevitable result of Francis Galton’s (1909) prediction made in the first decade of the twentieth century, that “the nation which first subjects itself to a rational eugenical discipline is bound to inherit the earth” (p. 34).

And also an excerpt with reference to the perceived lack of personality conducive to innovation on the part of Chinese:

Once China has established the world state, it will be concerned with raising the prosperity of its subject populations, just as other colonial powers have been. One of its first measures to promote this objective will be to introduce worldwide eugenic programs. These will include programs of both positive and negative eugenics. With regard to negative eugenics, one of its first objectives will be to reverse the dysgenic fertility that appeared in Europe, the United States, and the rest of the economically developed world in the middle and later decades of the nineteenth century and persisted into the twentieth century and that developed later in most of the remainder of the world. It can be expected that in its European and North American provinces, the Chinese will introduce the same eugenic measures that had been pioneered in China, consisting of both the classical eugenics of parental licensing and the new eugenics of the mandatory use of embryo selection for conception. The Chinese may well also introduce the cloning of the elites of the European peoples. The Chinese will be aware that while they and other Oriental peoples have a higher average intelligence, the European peoples have a greater capacity for creative achievement, probably arising from a higher level of psychopathic personality, enabling them more easily to challenge existing ways of thinking and to produce creative innovations. This will be part of human genetic diversity that the Chinese will be keen to preserve and foster. They will regard the European peoples rather in the same way as the Romans regarded the Greeks after they had incorporated them into the Roman empire. Although the Romans had conquered the Greeks by their military superiority, they respected the Greeks for having developed a higher level of civilization than they themselves had been able to achieve. The Chinese will view their European subject peoples in a similar manner.

I do increasingly believe, as I’ve already written numerous times on this blog, that lack of creative potential of Chinese is way overstated. In the 20th century, they achieved a fair bit in terms of creativity at the highest levels, especially in STEM, in spite of very disadvantaged environmental circumstances. The Chinese did not develop modern science; I think though this has more to do with their having started later, civilization-wise, than the rest of the world due to limited scope and geographic obstacles than with their innate ability/personality. Agriculture and writing were independently developed in China substantially later than it was in Mesopotamia. I see an analogy here. Chinese often like to use the fact that Japan did not develop its own writing system to show contempt for this comparatively little country that Chinese themselves suffered so much from in modern times. This is clearly not because Japanese are less naturally talented (their IQ is about the same); they were basically too small to do so before Chinese characters were transmitted to them. There are actually quite a few Chinese who achieved at the highest levels of STEM (and even more Japanese), they are lesser known though due to their foreignness. As for names, there are quite a few, and one can easily find them online. I’ll go as far as Chen-Ning Yang in theoretical physics and Shing-Shen Chern in pure math.

Again, Chinese culture still lacks presence in the outside world, and China itself is still a developing country, though of course significant parts of China are basically at developed levels GDP wise. So even if Chinese are extremely good and creative, they have a harder time getting recognized and realizing their potential. This also has much to do with a relative lack of truly leading edge science culture and tradition in China, which will take some time. Transmission of knowledge from cultures and lands so far apart is by no means trivial.

We all know that it’s often not enough to be actually good. You also have to win politically. China is increasingly doing that. Its political system far apart from the norm set by the West is becoming increasingly credible to the dismay of many Western elites as China rises in economically, technologically, and militarily. The more powerful China becomes, the more easily Chinese will be able to advocate for themselves on the international stage and get recognized for their achievements. This reminds me of how many say Soviet scientists had to do better work than Western scientists to win the same big prizes, most of all the Nobel, because the West had the political sway to bias the committees to its favor somewhat. There is also, I guess, that the West can be very biased in who it promotes in the media. Like, the Nobel Peace Prize is a basically a complete joke, but there are people politically influential enough to make a big deal out of it.

What I believe is grossly under-recognized is how much creativity and daring it has taken for the Chinese to create their own, unique political system and maintain sufficient faith in it up to this day. In many ways, in this respect, the 90s, right after the Soviet collapse, when there was all this Francis Fukuyama end of history nonsense, was a nadir for China. But we’re now past that, and time seems to be on the side of the Chinese. I guess they will still need more people like me to advocate for these alternative perspectives to the extent that they becomes the new normal, in the international setting.

王明瑞,极有趣的中国青年

通过一位丹麦人,我有幸认识到了王明瑞,一位中国研究生。但与典型的循规蹈矩死读书的研究生恰恰相反。比如,他翻译了理查德·林恩,专门研究智商及其种族和性别差异的心理学教授,撰写的Eugenics: A Reassessment (Human Evolution, Behavior, and Intelligence)(翻译成中文为《优生学:重评(人类进化,行为和智力)》),但目前还无法将此出版。同时,他还是中文维基百科具有十一年编辑经验的人。前几天,我给他看了我的《祝党的生日快乐》一文,他却回,“最后一个链接所指的中文维基百科页是我添加的”。我总是好奇是什么样的中国人为中文维基百科和百度百科这些中文百科做相当大贡献,猜测肯定大多是一些具有某种性格的学生,只能说很高兴终于认识到了此中一员。我想他肯定还有其它的我未知的才华和成就,毕竟我对它这个人还了解的相当少,刚网上认识吗。中国像他这样的人看来还是有不少,但是我觉得还是远远不够,与美国相比,这当然跟中国的应试教育体制有一定的关系,当然在中国考上大学或进入真正工作之后也不太在乎这些的,还是要看你能做出什么真正的成果来,之后学习没有考试,要靠自己主动,而靠非考试的方式展示自己的知识和技能。前几天发邮件我还写道:

I created a few days a Baidu account using my US mobile phone number, with the thought of possibly contributing a bit to Baidu Encyclopedia, which to my disappointment doesn’t even have LaTeX support, though I have learned much from its non-mathematical content over the years. China still has a long way to go, but I believe they will get there in a matter of time.

还想强调在这方面中国人还真的是比白人差一些,白人有更多愿意自愿投入这类的。刚和他(在脸书上)又聊了另一个话题:

MingruiOnAntiCPCPropaganda

所以王明瑞是非常独立思考的人,为了满足求知欲要翻墙,但翻了墙后对新的信息依然保持批判性思维,多赞!谁知道那,说不定王明瑞的星星之火会将来燎起中国的优生大原。我就希望中国能多出一些像王明瑞这样的人。

 

More on population, eugenics, China

I had the pleasure of learning recently the name of the guy who is said to have proposed the one-child policy in China. His name is Song Jian, and he is a PhD in control theory from Moscow State who later became one of China’s top experts in missile guidance systems, rising up on the state apparatus through that. Well, it only became natural for him to develop a theory of population control that with his prestige and position was eventually put into implementation. In 1950, China’s population was 475 million. By 1975, that had risen to over 900 million, almost doubling in a quarter of a century.

Of course, it’s somewhat of a brutal policy. On this, I’ve seen some very kind and loving Americans who have adopted orphans from China, and most of them are female. Yes, there is due to this a gender imbalance, with necessarily means some men won’t be able to get married and have children, which will cause some social problems. Though it surely has its merits, in that it prevents genuinely dysfunctional people from having too many children. From this we can only expect that my generation of Chinese will have higher average IQ and overall ability than the generation of my parents, many of whom grew up with quite a few siblings.

Again, I am both surprised and pleased to hear that this infamous one-child policy originated from a hard (maybe even autistic, by today’s ridiculous standards 😉 ) scientist as opposed to some politician, though of course, once he became old, he essentially became a politician. By the way, I’m totally in favor of a totalitarian state run by people like him, me, and Hsu. I think with that, the world would become a much better place. I’m also pleased that Hsu, despite being a distant relative of Chiang Kai-shek, wishes the Chinese government could go more in that direction. In DNA Dreams, he was like

You have to remember that BGI is an independent, maverick organization, it’s not part of the Chinese government. People in the West, who we talked to, like even my colleagues at Oregon that I talked to about this project, they say, oh can’t the Chinese government just ORDER all the smart kids to show up, they’ll just order all the smart kids to spit in a tube and you’ll get their saliva, and I said well I wish that were the case.

I remember vividly how once when hanging out with some people, one of whom appeared in that documentary, right after that part was played, another guy cracked up. It’s like, Hsu is not only an IQ and genius obsessed freak, he’s also a pro-Chinese communist!!!!!! Well, not every uber high IQ person I’ve talked to agrees with him. One, a math PhD who knows quantum field theory and general relativity, believes that if Hsu’s vision does pan out, people will be more miserable, and we’ll have more genius misanthropes who end up like Robert Mercer. Another, on my telling him Hsu’s suggestion of the possibility of some regime’s eventually making IQs under 80 and expensive genetic diseases illegal, was like: his ideas scare me. I had also told him about Hsu’s opinion that any smart government would invest just as much in genomic prediction as it would on, say, a particle accelerator. Well, as a derivative of that, Hsu thinks that the Chinese government could get even smarter than it is right now. Oh yes, in DNA Dreams, Hsu also brought up the possibility of producing nice humans, honorable humans, caring humans, which means he’s not exclusively an IQ elitist, and is aware that a large number of people with those aforementioned traits not associated with brains is also beneficial and necessary for the world. Though Hsu can be pretty damn elitist and aggressive, I highly doubt he’s a psychopath with any malicious intent, and he is elitist and aggressive, I believe, in the right way. Not to mention that he’s also just very realistic, like most high IQ people, and at the same time ambitious enough to pursue his dream of using genomic prediction to create a better world. If only there were more people like Hsu in positions of power and influence.