More WMAF

Uber IPOed lately. I saw that Kalanick’s girlfriend is this Angie You, so another WMAF. And Alan Eustace this SVP at Google who joined in early 2000s or maybe even 1999 has some Eustace-Kwan Foundation. There was also that Sergei Brin-Amanda Rosenberg affair, and Rosenberg is the product of some Jewish-Chinese relationship in Hong Kong.

I once looked up the VPs at Facebook and the ones of Chinese descent were mostly if not almost all female. Starts from the top with Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan.

As for Google, I vaguely recalling reading that Eric Schmidt also once dated some Vietnamese concert pianist or something like that.

Not to mention I’m also reminded of that Amy Chua who is married some Jewish law professor at Yale. Her tiger mother book certainly didn’t help with positive publicity of Chinese in America.

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Why native Chinese girls are 1000x better

I now chat with at least two (native Chinese girls), one of whom is a mother of two, a fair bit. Unlike with females I encounter in America, I can talk with them pretty honestly and openly about race, sex, culture, etc. I was just talking with one of them, and I thought it’s worthwhile to record some of what we said. There’s quite a lot, so expect what you see here to be far from inclusive.

I told her about ChinaSuperpower, in particular his thesis that the Anglo elite/mainstream is out for genocide against East Asians. They do it quite aggressively through the media and Hollywood, and trust me, I’ve seen enough racist Hollywood movies, with the one coming to mind during our discussion The Interview, which was on assassinating Kim Jong-Un and involved subverting some sex object like North Korean girl towards that.

I said that if the Anglo elites could, they totally would commit genocide against East Asians, and Russians/Slavics too. Obviously, blacks, Muslims, and Indians are not liked in the Anglo world, but the Anglo elites don’t really seriously care about them as much because they are no real threat to Anglo hegemony, more of an annoyance. On the other hand, you have a lot of big, tall, macho, highly competent Russian men with a base in a country still extremely powerful despite the calamity following the disintegration of the USSR, in which they lost like 10% of their population. I’ve heard that in the UK, those guys, who take many of the STEM jobs, trigger a lot of insecurity in the Brits. As for the Chinese, this need not really be explained, just look at the recent Huawei incident for example.

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知乎上的张学军对陶哲轩(tao)不太看好

知乎上有个张学军,介绍里有“复旦大学”,“数学”,“高等教育”。然后他的回答大多将如何纯数学在走向衰落,因为重要的有价值的东西已经做得差不多了,现在的菲尔兹奖是一届不如一届,一代不如一代,劝年轻人退出。他对陶哲轩不太看好,并为此写了几个回答。

我今天工作(做我的disqussearch.com的事情)加写作已经累了,所以就不写太多了。就把几个关于tao的回答复制到这上面吧。

陶哲轩的太太外貌一般,其实不难理解。按美国人的刻板印象,陶哲轩是典型的东亚男性:数学天才、书呆子、老好人、不擅与异性交往。这种样子怎么能找到很漂亮的女人?像陶那样,找一个崇拜自己的女学生,不失为解决终身大事的好办法。

陶哲轩和杨振宁不能比。杨振宁那一辈搞学术的,很多出身大户人家,见过大世面,风流倜傥,吟诗作画,追女人是小case。而陶出身医生、老师家庭,很大概率是nerd。

老婆外貌一般也就罢了,还是韩国人。美国华裔那么多,为什么不找个华裔?

陶不仅讨个韩国老婆,还不会中文,这就彻底断了自己和中国在文化上的联系。虽然陶的父亲解释过,为什么陶没有学中文,但是那个理由听上去非常牵强。

在印象中,陶只来过中国大陆一次,还是参加与数学竞赛有关的活动,与学术无关。

种种迹象表明,陶对中国不大友好,有成见。很可能像很多华裔小孩那样,对自己的中国血统困惑、嫌弃。

陶哲轩的父亲,解放前从上海逃往香港,想必在思想上反g恐g。后来可能又觉得香港随时会被“解放”,又前往澳大利亚,离中国越远越好。陶哲轩出生在这样的家庭,他的一些行为就不难理解了。

算了,不叫他陶哲轩了,以后还是叫他Tao。因为他实在是愧为华裔。

作者:张学军
链接:https://www.zhihu.com/question/271890712/answer/368024252
来源:知乎
著作权归作者所有。商业转载请联系作者获得授权,非商业转载请注明出处。

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Blatant anti-China bias in Google search results

I looked up a guy (using US IP address, clearing all cookies so that they don’t remember any China related IP information) with top tier credentials in elite STEM contests plus top undergrad, PhD, and postdoc institutions on each of Google, Bing, and Yahoo. His page in the Chinese institution where he is now does not appear in the Google results, but it is the first result in each of Bing and Yahoo. I guess it’s not that fair to blame Google since Google is shut out of China anyway so they have some license to not index or down rank results from domains with China IP addresses, especially ones under the .cn top level domain. Baidu also does not really index and rank certain US sites very well, though if you look up programming stuff, you can still more or less easily find the quality English content.

Oh, I also tried on Yandex and Baidu (in pinyin using English alphabet) but no result, but that’s also fair since they are meant to serve the Russian and Chinese languages.

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Google Translate blacked out on my site

I use WordPress for it. I had installed a Google Translate plugin. But when I loaded it from a China IP address, I saw in my browser a request to translate.google blocked. That Google Translate module couldn’t load. Similar happens on many other US sites, including Unz Review, and blogspot (owned by Google I believe) is plain blocked in China. I believe Google Analytics has a request made on the client side, which means there might be some trouble logging China visits through that.

So I guess if you want your site to be more functional across the entire world, you should probably boycott Google and its subsidiaries? I have imagined a scenario where in diplomacy China provides a small country some benefit in exchange for their shutting out Google. That really could happen. In a decade’s time, China could really have the leverage to pull that off.

Now I pretty much only use Google’s services when it would be really inconvenient not to and that’s not very often.

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May Day in China

In China, people have May 1st thru May 4th off. Because of that, I am meeting some people and also taking some time to wind down. There is also that May 4th 2019 is the 100th anniversary of that May 4th Movement back in 1919 which was crucial towards the founding of communist party, etc, and we are seeing some stuff on TV with Xi Jinping and other high up party people in relation to that.

I won’t go much into the background of that, not that I know too much about it. Basically, it was a protest out of the decision in the Versailles Treaty to hand over the colonies in Shandong (Qingdao in particular) relinquished by Germany to Japan instead. I’m not all that clear as to what happened in the end, I believe China was able to win back those places but with some heavy price. The movement was crucial towards the beginning of “Marxism” in China with people like 李大钊, 蔡元培, etc.

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一些关于所谓sexual racism(性感种族主义)的想法

刚才把下面的照片发给了一位女生,问她对这美女如何评价。

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她的评价我就不说了,没有那么高。我就说说我自己的评价吧。可能还是过于受美国媒体文化的影响,一看就觉得是典型的身材好,金发碧眼的来自有钱背景的白人美女。毫无疑问,她显得非常白,这种女人在美国是根本不会搭理我的。记得有一次,在个小博物馆里快要关门了,碰到了一个白人姑娘跟我差不多大吧,不是金发的,颜值仅仅可以,我就试试跟她聊了,一开始好像找了“理由”主动跟她说几句,比如“这博物馆什么时候关门”,或者“你觉得这博物馆的美术如何”,之后我问了她他是做什么的,“她说她在华盛顿DC一个美术的non-profit工作”,我也跟她说了我是做软件开发的。没多久,她对我的态度就是一种”alright bye”。

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Thoughts on Google in China

I stumbled upon this MIT Technology Review article: https://www.technologyreview.com/s/612601/how-google-took-on-china-and-lost/. It was quite accurate and well-written. I have put it in my reprints section. Link: https://gmachine1729.com/reprints/how-google-took-on-china-and-lost/.

I remember seeing it used back in its infancy back in 1999. Moreover, around 2000 probably, my mom showed me some newspaper article on the two Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. Her words were something like, “they’re so young and already so rich and successful through this. If you’re really good at math, in the future maybe you could become like them too.” I was very little at that time.

There isn’t actually any serious math in most software engineering. Sure, PageRank has some math involved, with matrices and eigenvectors applied to “link analysis,” but overall, it’s more of an engineering, with the math just a tool. My math ability is quite strong but nothing spectacular, and my software engineering ability is probably quite mediocre though certainly good enough to be a software engineer at a top company, as I’ve already done.

Speaking of math, Sergey Brin’s father was a math professor at University of Maryland. Due to his being Jewish, he wasn’t able to officially be a graduate student in the USSR, but the system there back then was flexible enough to let him earn his PhD by passing some exams and writing a thesis with some original work in his spare time, while he worked in the Gosplan, if I remember correctly, the institution involved in economic planning. His dad was unable to get a full time job doing math despite the PhD, despite being quite a good mathematician. Eventually, their family took the difficult move to immigrate to the US, and Sergey ended up hating the USSR for “totalitarianism.”

We all know that USSR very much sided against Israel during the Cold War, so Jews there were by default persona non grata. Though you could become an exception if you really proved yourself not too Jewish in your politics or whatnot, as did Iosif Kobzon (the baritone singer of Soviet red songs considered the Russian Frank Sinatra) and some others. In any case, the USSR didn’t let Jews fuck up the country for their own benefit as the US has done, which is quite respectable. The Jews there made enormous contribution to arts and sciences with their talents, though not in a way that was so much “for the Jewish interest,” as has been the case in America.

I don’t exactly blame Sergey for his political stance. He’s a Jew, not a Russian. I bet he never really felt Russian, just like how I never felt American despite growing up in America. To align with the US over the USSR is very natural for a Jew, for reasons too obvious.

Before I developed some knowledge and credentials, I naturally saw Google very highly, almost blindly so. But over time, I saw some not all that great people becoming software engineers there, which is only natural given how many people they hire. A PhD student told me to my great surprise during my second year of college that I’m definitely smarter than the average Google developer. IQ wise that almost certainly is the case, but being a successful software engineer there is much more than about IQ.

Now I obviously don’t have any awe of Google. Almost certainly, it has the best distributed systems and AI technology. It has the most active users of any internet company in the world (its search engine, Gmail, Chrome, etc). I know and have interacted substantially with many engineers there. 90% of its money is through advertising, and because advertising is so lucrative when you are such a huge media platform, they can afford to pay its employees better, even if most of its engineers do pretty mundane work. Google has also done quite well at marketing, it’s come across as so cool and sexy, and for anybody to challenge it, that person would be mostly viewed as rather strange and uncool.

Larry and Sergey founded the company as graduate students at Stanford. They made a prototype search engine (pretty much a toy project) and I read they almost sold it for a million dollars (it was rejected because the other party found probably their thing not all that great). But after persisting with it and turning it into a company, they managed to secure enough funding and credibility that they could hire some really top notch engineers to make a top-notch technical product.

Yahoo was number one before Google (and was close to acquiring it even), but eventually, Google triumphed. One could say that Jerry Yang and David Filo could have become Larry and Sergey. Or maybe not. Larry and Sergey had a better background. US venture capitalists naturally would prefer Jews, especially a Jew from the Soviet Union who denounced it. Quality of technology is only one aspect of success. Connections and marketing tends to matter way more. Usually once you have enough of the latter, you can more or less buy the former. Larry and Sergey certainly weren’t the best at technology themselves, but they managed to hire people who were to create the real Google. In fact, people were telling me about how there are still traces of them asking some really naive technical questions on the Internet.

I remember Google’s leaving China in early 2010 all over the press. At that time, Google seemed so awesome, and the Chinese government seemed so uncool and shameful. Google appeared to have the moral high ground fighting against an evil communist dictatorship. They had like 25% market share at the time, while Baidu had around 60%, based on what I remember. Kaifu Lee was heading Google China and he was considered a big deal. (I’ve written on here about reading his Chinese book titled A Walk into the Future back in 2008 which after I actually learned math and computer science and actually spent time in academia and the software industry realized was kind of full of shit.) But after Google left, Kaifu also left. He failed to deliver Google in China. As for why Google actually left, that’s quite complex and hard to know for certain. Google will say it was due to being hacked and its principles against censorship. Baidu will say Google was losing money in China (I wouldn’t be surprised if that were the case). Some will say that the Chinese government pretty much forced it out.

As written in that article from Technology Review linked above, the Chinese government has gained much more power and credibility over the past decade, though still disliked in the West. A decade ago, the Chinese government felt like China really needed Google and Silicon Valley giants for the technology and expertise and thus had to make certain concessions; now, that is no longer the case. A decade ago, people in China still really looked up to America. To challenge America’s credibility, especially that of its top institutions, like Google, like Harvard, would have given people some really funny looks in China. Now, with the benefit of China’s sizable advance in economy and technology, the trend seems to be turning. People are thinking more critically now in the face of an authority, including myself, reaching conclusions politically difficult to accept a decade ago.

From my reading and talking with people in China, as China gradually opened up in the 1980s, with more Chinese going to America and spread of American media in China, many in China lost confidence with the home country and eventually questioned the ideology and political system. The difference in level of technology and standard of living was one between heaven and earth. For instance, back then, cars were something that pretty much only organizations could afford. For the best of that generation, success meant being able to go to America for graduate school. Of course, the difference between US and China in 1980 was far smaller than in 1950, but people then did not think that way. They only saw superficially that the material standard of living in America was leagues higher. It was such that people even looked up to the four Asian tigers of South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore as examples to learn from, let alone Japan. After the 89 incident, the political climate in some sense went further in that direction despite the government crackdown and more people wanted to leave the country.

Now that China is far more developed, more people are realizing the foolishness and shortsightedness of certain behaviors and decisions back then and more openly calling them out. As a consequence, people now kind of hate Deng Xiaoping, who some would regard as having come close to having seriously ruined the country. Quite prominently, China in 1980s was already test flying some Boeing 707 like passenger aircraft that was heavily invested in from 1970 on. But much due to its association with the people in power during the Cultural Revolution that Deng’s faction sidelined afterwards, the project was cancelled and the fruits of the R&D, the expertise accumulated, was pretty much wasted. If not for that, China may well already have had her own passenger aircraft in service by 2000, whereas now the target is roughly 2025, after they decided to restart R&D of passenger aircraft sometime in the 2000s. Back then, the political climate was such that integration with America and the rest of the world trumped actual, high quality development. As for those top mainland Chinese who went to America, some did well in academia and industrial R&D, while many only became more or less average engineers or scientists, all within American institutions, as a passive, second-tier minority. Many of the seconds who might have tried to go to America but weren’t able to (or a minority of top people who were patriotic enough to not buy into America even in that climate) ended up heading important projects in China or getting rich in business. As a concrete example, China has developed her own satellite navigation system, Beidou, which entered worldwide service lately according to online sources, an alternative to GPS that came 20+ years later. The Chinese in China who lead that endeavor might not be as smart as the smartest Chinese in America, but they have valuable expertise that no group of Chinese in America could ever have. Beidou is much more valuable than Google, which is honestly quite easily replicable, just at lower quality and scale. In contrast, only America, Russia, and China have the technical expertise and resources to a develop a satellite navigation system.

I’ve come to realize more so over the past year or two that over the 40 years of opening and reform, China did not get all that much from America, nothing that close to outweighed the risk of being dragged into a fire, which I managed to (one could say, narrowly) escape. In contrast, what the Soviets gave to China the 1950s industry and technology wise provided China’s modern foundation; it has been decisive to China’s success today. Moreover, the political and cultural influence from the Soviet Union on China is actually a durable one which has drastically transformed the inner soul of the Chinese people and nation for the better. Remarkable that forty years of direct exposure and interaction with a powerful and subversive America could defeat it not, with the trend now turning the other direction. Continue reading “Thoughts on Google in China”