More on population, eugenics, China

I had the pleasure of learning recently the name of the guy who is said to have proposed the one-child policy in China. His name is Song Jian, and he is a PhD in control theory from Moscow State who later became one of China’s top experts in missile guidance systems, rising up on the state apparatus through that. Well, it only became natural for him to develop a theory of population control that with his prestige and position was eventually put into implementation. In 1950, China’s population was 475 million. By 1975, that had risen to over 900 million, almost doubling in a quarter of a century.

Of course, it’s somewhat of a brutal policy. On this, I’ve seen some very kind and loving Americans who have adopted orphans from China, and most of them are female. Yes, there is due to this a gender imbalance, with necessarily means some men won’t be able to get married and have children, which will cause some social problems. Though it surely has its merits, in that it prevents genuinely dysfunctional people from having too many children. From this we can only expect that my generation of Chinese will have higher average IQ and overall ability than the generation of my parents, many of whom grew up with quite a few siblings.

Again, I am both surprised and pleased to hear that this infamous one-child policy originated from a hard (maybe even autistic, by today’s ridiculous standards 😉 ) scientist as opposed to some politician, though of course, once he became old, he essentially became a politician. By the way, I’m totally in favor of a totalitarian state run by people like him, me, and Hsu. I think with that, the world would become a much better place. I’m also pleased that Hsu, despite being a distant relative of Chiang Kai-shek, wishes the Chinese government could go more in that direction. In DNA Dreams, he was like

You have to remember that BGI is an independent, maverick organization, it’s not part of the Chinese government. People in the West, who we talked to, like even my colleagues at Oregon that I talked to about this project, they say, oh can’t the Chinese government just ORDER all the smart kids to show up, they’ll just order all the smart kids to spit in a tube and you’ll get their saliva, and I said well I wish that were the case.

I remember vividly how once when hanging out with some people, one of whom appeared in that documentary, right after that part was played, another guy cracked up. It’s like, Hsu is not only an IQ and genius obsessed freak, he’s also a pro-Chinese communist!!!!!! Well, not every uber high IQ person I’ve talked to agrees with him. One, a math PhD who knows quantum field theory and general relativity, believes that if Hsu’s vision does pan out, people will be more miserable, and we’ll have more genius misanthropes who end up like Robert Mercer. Another, on my telling him Hsu’s suggestion of the possibility of some regime’s eventually making IQs under 80 and expensive genetic diseases illegal, was like: his ideas scare me. I had also told him about Hsu’s opinion that any smart government would invest just as much in genomic prediction as it would on, say, a particle accelerator. Well, as a derivative of that, Hsu thinks that the Chinese government could get even smarter than it is right now. Oh yes, in DNA Dreams, Hsu also brought up the possibility of producing nice humans, honorable humans, caring humans, which means he’s not exclusively an IQ elitist, and is aware that a large number of people with those aforementioned traits not associated with brains is also beneficial and necessary for the world. Though Hsu can be pretty damn elitist and aggressive, I highly doubt he’s a psychopath with any malicious intent, and he is elitist and aggressive, I believe, in the right way. Not to mention that he’s also just very realistic, like most high IQ people, and at the same time ambitious enough to pursue his dream of using genomic prediction to create a better world. If only there were more people like Hsu in positions of power and influence.

Taiwan on WordPress

I recently saw how now China is demanding that airlines across the world stop listing Taiwan and Hong Kong as separate countries. And it is succeeding somewhat, with several, the most prominent of which is arguably Delta, having already succumbed. When I just looked at the countries of visitors of my site, I was pleased to see some hits from Taiwan. Could the Chinese government start demanding the same from WordPress? Well, WordPress would have no reason to care, because it is already banned in China anyway, so it has nothing to lose, and also nothing to gain unless the Chinese government offers in exchange to un-ban it, which seems exceedingly unlikely. And because of that, I am hosting this on another domain, while still using WordPress as the content generation and storage tool. To be honest, I also refer to Taiwan as separate from China, because it really is different. It’s been under its own system since 1950 when the KMT fled there, and has obviously developed its own political culture. There is also that it was colonized by Japan and was really only settled by Han Chinese from the 17th century on, not to mention that it was also briefly colonized by the Dutch and Spanish, until Koxinga. So I guess the place is not so integrally Chinese. The aborigines there were displaced, with the Han population in Taiwan’s being higher than it is in mainland China, and nobody really cares about that, even less so than people care about what happened to the Native Americans.

Apparently, China is more aggressive now on Taiwan, well obviously because it can. Some people seem exceedingly anxious that the fall of this last bastion of the free world seems imminent. They seem way more emotional about it than I am; I personally am pretty apathetic about Taiwan. Though maybe that’s because Taiwan will fall (or be liberated) sooner or later. Maybe if there really was a serious chance of Taiwanese independence, I would be a little worried, who knows.

I’ve noticed how so many Taiwanese have been massively successful in the US, especially in technology and academia. Jensen Huang of Nvidia, the stock of which has almost 10x’ed the past couple years. Jerry Yang of Yahoo. Steve Chen of YouTube. Horng-Tzer Yau as math professor at Harvard. And a few days ago, I learned to my great surprise that one of the main developers of AlphaGo is Taiwanese too, and his name is Aja Huang. Pretty impressive. A guy I know well, whose grandparents fled as KMT officers to Taiwan, was, on this, like: “well, those evil capitalists who fled to Taiwan sure weren’t a random cut of the population.” 😉 Obviously so, and believe me that it had occurred to me that the IQ distribution in Taiwan and Hong Kong is fat right-tailed for that very reason before he noted this. Many of the wealthy and highly educated fled there, either because they were in the KMT, or to preserve some of their wealth, or out of fear of prospects under the communists. Though surely, most of the cognitive elite stayed, with arguably most of them strongly against the KMT, and the newly established PRC was in fact quite successful at luring back those elite Chinese studying or working in the West at that time. I think it was great that those uber talented Chinese in Taiwan and Hong Kong were able to study in the West during that period, mostly in United States, where many of them reached astonishing levels of success, which means Chinese civilization maintained some really beneficial contact and exchange with the advanced Western countries despite the conflict. Relative to their counterparts in the mainland, they were certainly advantaged in this regard, at least individually, though surely, the elite Chinese who studied in the USSR also gained tremendously, for themselves yes, but much more for the expertise that they brought back to China, with all of them returning eventually by default, in contrast to those Taiwanese, who stayed in America as professors or engineers or technology entrepreneurs. Taiwan economically also seems to be doing quite well, with its semiconductor industry sufficiently prominent. Unfortunately for certain people, China is poised to gobble up all that, with Taiwan’s economy already dependent on the mainland.

Politically, obviously the regime that fled there, by virtue of their having to flee there, was full of sore, incompetent losers. Turns out Chiang Kai-shek et al. cared more about preserving himself than about preserving his mother country. Apparently, there was also a secret agreement between Chiang and Stalin right after the war where Stalin would promise not to support the communists in exchange for Chiang’s letting Mongolia become independent which would bring any Chinese nationalist utter humiliation. That Moscow did not support the Chinese communists in their war against Chiang, with the exception of sort of letting the Chinese communists capture the city of Harbin that the Red Army had occupied after they left, only makes the Chinese communists more formidable. In the following video, in a UN meeting, the Republic of China representative arguing in favor of his regime in exile says something along the lines of, in English: “it was not the purpose of the statement of Cairo and Potsdam to give Formosa to a puppet regime in China, so that that regime might as make it to its imperial master at Moscow, to use the resources of Formosa to destroy the freedom of the world and to break the peace of the world.” Expectedly, the PRC representative responded with rage, referring to the then 475 million Chinese, as an indication of just how genuinely democratic the Chinese communists actually were ;). Well, what he says has some truth to it, aside from the puppet regime part, by the aforementioned. We all know that those conferences at the end of WWII were mostly about how the US and USSR, the emergent superpowers, would share power after the war, with each wanting to get a bigger piece of the pie for himself. Since Chiang was pro-US, the US gave him a pretty damn good deal, especially relative to what he had actually contributed to the defeat of Japan in the war. I don’t think occurred to those Americans responsible for that the possibility that all of mainland China would fall to communism just 4 years later. Astonishingly, it did, even when America armed the KMT, whereas the USSR, by agreement with Chiang, had not armed his enemy. So all that for America backfired disastrously, and in fact, America was in reality indirectly arming its own enemy, the possibility of which probably also hardly occurred to those morons. On the other hand, America did an excellent job keeping its allies, the most important of which were in Western Europe and East Asia, especially relative to the USSR, which was critical for America’s winning the Cold War. In the region that China’s trying to take over now, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore all developed very well economically with America’s aid, for which America essentially bought their anti-communism in exchange. The thing is that now all that had been well-nurtured and seemingly secured is increasingly on the verge of being transferred away to a force that America has failed to tame. So backlash is perfectly expected, as there is much to lose. I don’t have anything to comment on this really other than what is roughly the objective situation. After all, I don’t like to be too politically opinionated. Though surely, I have quite a casual interest in politics, from a more scientific viewpoint. It’ll be fascinating to see what happens in the next X years.

 

My whole experience with the American school system

I accidentally stuffed my face last night and found myself too uncomfortable from that to do anything productive, to my great disappointment. So I verged onto non-technical topics again, and in particular, I reflected somewhat on my personal experience growing up as a Chinese immigrant kid in America, and I write this with a hope that it might be inspiring to others with a similar background.

I came in first grade not knowing a word of English, but at least I knew the alphabet. As for learning English, it didn’t help that my first grade ESL teacher was a woman parents from Taiwan who was likely born in the US, who spoke Mandarin. I remember she would tell me that my Chinese was more proper than hers, as she really only learned it in college. Well, as you can guess, because I could speak Chinese to her if needed, I didn’t even know English all that well even after a year. I remember there were kids in that class from a variety of places, from Russia to Japan to Colombia. I wasn’t very well behaved, and near the end of the year, when we were watching some Disney movie, she actually put tape on my mouth.

I had forgotten like all my written Chinese by end of third grade, including how to write my Chinese name. But that summer there, I was able to relearn some of that.

My parents didn’t really give me much pressure academically. I would expect that they were very busy themselves. So throughout grade school, much of my life consisted of playing and watching basketball and baseball, and also stuff like Pokémon, and also piano practice, which I initially disliked but grew to like as became somewhat good at it, by a low standard. My teachers could tell that I was smart, especially at math, but I was quite hyperactive and poorly behaved.

No offense, but where I was, most of the kids and parents I encountered were pretty fucking dumb and ignorant. They seemed content with a chill, mediocre life, the bliss of ignorance. The other kids could sort of tell I was smart, but I was also pretty fucking socially weird. In third, fourth, and sixth grade, the teachers invited me to this “games club,” which I later found was designated for kids identified by the teacher to be deficient in social skills.

I wasn’t in any gifted program. I was actually not even able to test into one, because my verbal IQ was apparently way too low. So I felt like I was inferior compared to kids in gifted programs, but by now, I’ve basically far surpassed basically all of them.

My junior high which was 7th to 9th grade absolutely sucked. The teachers were really fucking stupid. The math was bull shit with graphing calculators, and the history class was full of stupid political indoctrination. I got low grades in 9th grade English and history, one because I was super immature and impulsive, and another because that teacher, who was an idiot far-right (American style) scumbag, absolutely hated me. It certainly affected my self-esteem very negatively. I was problematic in a way yes, but I dare say much was because I had far more latent IQ/talent than the other students that nobody had nurtured in me.

High school was better but still pretty shitty. I was in this IB program much of which was an utter waste of time and was really at quite a joke of a level academically. I had already realized that, doing math contests and such. However, even there, because my foundation was so shitty, I did not progress anywhere as efficiently as I could have. On the other hand, most of those kids in the full IB program thought they were doing so well, because they were in it, and getting good grades, not considering that most got As. The truth is of course that most of those kids, the way they were, had no future in anything serious. Another positive thing to happen for me then was that I started reading various stuff online I found interesting, including in Chinese, on my own. The more I learned, the more I realized how much of a joke the American school system is. It is ridden with the worst type of political indoctrination and scant on actual intellectual substance.

Now, most other advanced countries have an education system where students test into high schools based on their ability. There is much more academic preparation provided at the early stages, and more popularization of serious academic contests like the AMCs. There is also a system of vocational education for those who are less academically inclined, which is great, because practical skills should not be underrated. In contrast, American schools are too concerned with the self-esteem of students to tell them that they are basically garbage, academically, and they are falling short in terms of providing alternatives to prepare them for the real world. The result of course is that their self-esteem will become eventually utterly wrecked in college and the real world where people care more about your actual ability and work and don’t really give a damn about how hard you tried. Of course, now college in America has become a joke too, and so overpriced. On that, Charles Murray is completely right that most students in college right now in America would be better served learning some practical vocational skills as opposed to studying bullshit liberal arts.

I was quite socially clueless in high school, and I was not even that aware of the discrimination against Asians in college admissions. My parents were anything but savvy about the college admissions process in America. Expectedly, high school was full of morons padding their resumes with substance-less stuff just for that. I absolutely hated that, and I cared more about actually learning some serious stuff. That includes math, physics, algorithms, Chinese, history (that was not the brainwash taught in class). Okay, I was a joke at basically all of them but far better than almost all my classmates. There were I think three kids in my year who were accepted to Yale but to me they were the stereotypical superficial well-rounded conformist well-socialized types, and one was an athlete. Another was a very superficial whitewashed Asian who even had a non-Asian surname that I later learned was changed officially when he was a kid. Now I know what he was really up to.

College was much better. It was a flagship state school, and I didn’t mix well with most of the kids there, who I again felt were mostly drones and tools, but there were certainly some really sharp ones, and a few who I had genuine chemistry with. I did of course waste some time on general ed courses. On the more positive end, I could in that environment learn more serious math and science, and also engineering. Because I majored in math and computer science though, I would say that there was very little natural science or real engineering. Moreover, I could meet people from all over the place, including graduate students who had attended elite schools for undergrad, and also talk with international students from China there. The latter partially motivated to improve my Chinese further, to the point that reading it online felt basically as natural as reading English. From that, I also learned more about Chinese culture and the Chinese education system. I felt I was finally seriously shedding away the tremendous damage the American education system had imparted on me, the more socially acceptable it became to detach from that crowd. Though it was much better than high school, I was still not terribly content with the curriculum or the people around me. I felt I was learning too little actual math and especially science, as virtually zero of the latter was required for computer science majors. The computer science majors thought they were really good because they were in this supposedly very competitive program, bound to get six figure jobs in industry, and they were fine at programming, but really, their level of IQ, on average, was quite low. They absolutely sucked at math and had no concept of how to prove anything. There were of course exceptions who mostly kept to themselves. Like this kid who wrote his own compiler for a subset of Java in Haskell early sophomore year, which he taught himself. At programming, I was pretty garbage, lacking the engineering sense at that time, but I was not bad at algorithms, given my math ability. Overall, I am rather disappointed with my college experience. Because my starting point was so low, and because many of the students were dull but studious and conforming enough (to get better grades than I did), I became easily content and cocky at times, and also frustrated. I can blame both my lack of ability and maturity and also lack of fit of the whole educational experience to a guy like me. I sort of kept some distance from most of the other students. Again, many were tools, who I had little desire to be around. Of course, they will excel in the typical tech job, but that’s another matter. In fact, they may well have life much more easy than I do.

Summer after junior year was a major turning point for me. Through a superconnector of high achieving students many if not most at elite places like MIT and Harvard, I met and began chatting online with a few people at Caltech, MIT, and the likes. I expected them to be brilliant or at least solid academically but reality was disappointing, though almost certainly, they were below average ones at those places. However, there was one guy from a top Canadian school and another from a more mediocre state school who were both freakishly smart and competent. I looked up to both of them greatly. I was inspired by a few of them to enter competitive programming, with one of them’s being an IOI medalist, and with some practice on TopCoder, I managed to lead a team the following year to place in the top 10 in ACM regionals.

Something else that happened was that I sort of discovered Marxist literature online, partially inspired by my genius Russian friend, who was also quite a misfit, very defiant of the whole American cultural and political value system. Ironically, he’s actually doing his PhD now at a place famous for American blue-bloods, and he does not express a high opinion in general of the undergrads there, many who are not actually talented but are from well-off families who know how to game the whole system. Given my heritage, Marxist literature necessarily means learning more about the whole culture and tradition created by the Chinese communists, which I found quite fascinating and inspiring. Of course, I also learned some Russian stuff. As I did, I felt ever more indignant with respect to all the historical and political lies promulgated and normalized in American society by the media, lauded as a free one, but in reality, controlled largely by what one can crudely characterize as destroyers of civilization. In the process, I fell in love with Soviet music, which is of much higher artistic quality and substance than the trash kids listen to nowadays. It even idealistically inspired me to fight for a better world. Of course, now I know how hard that is, but I am not giving up just yet.

In college, there was of course pressure to conform, to act in a socially acceptable way, to not be too strange. That means not being openly elitist and critical the way I am right now. That also means not acting in a way that is too un-American. I’m a guy who came here in first grade, not an international student from China. In some sense, it’s not right for me to not be like all those ABCs. It kind of sucks to grow up as an Asian immigrant kid in America. It sucks even more if you’re actually nerdy/smart and culturally/politically sane, like I am. You feel like there is something wrong with you, but of course, now I am confident that that is not true, and that it is in fact American society/culture that is becoming ever more fucked up. Michael O Church can attest to this.

Now, after college. I got to meet some way more interesting, smart people, learn way more interesting things. I could fully distance myself from the uninspiring people I went to school with. This includes people from all over the world, across all age groups, with much deeper and more varied expertise. That includes IMO and IOI medalists, top finishers on the Putnam contest, people in top or good grad schools, some of whom are really impressive, and some of whom are nowhere near the level that they may look on paper superficially. My cultural, historical, political, and linguistic knowledge went up quite another level. Of course, I also saw more first hand from working how the world actually works, which really only parents will tell you. On this, Michael O Church loves to say how it’s the moderately privileged kids whose parents are in mostly meritocratic places like medicine and academia who can be sheltered enough to be naive. In contrast, underprivileged kids need to be street smart just to survive, while genuinely privileged kids know how rigged the system is and how to game it. I felt so much more free because I finally found more like-minded people with whom I could talk openly without fear of how I might be perceived. I was able to in the process re-mould myself into the organic me as opposed to the me under the yoke of a specific educational system.

Finally, I shall speak specifically on growing up Asian in the American education system. Overall, it’s a pretty shitty cultural experience. They’re not really American, no matter how hard they try, yet they lose the ability to be a genuine Asian. Fortunately, I shielded myself from that largely on my own initiative. It wasn’t always easy, but in the long run, that was quite a wise choice, and I encourage more people with same background as me to do the same. Learn from the good aspects of America, not from the toxic ones. Do this with any culture, any system. Also, exposure to genuine Chinese culture can shield you from the pseudo one presented by the American media that has done so much to confuse the thinking and damage the self-esteem of people like me, but not like me.

Reflecting on my experience, I really wished that I could have gotten a much better education. American education really is pretty shitty, especially for actually smart people, if you’re not very well situated in terms of schools and parents. Of course, later on, it gets much better.

I’ll conclude by going on a tangent. That is, my *anti-Semitism* that kicked off recently. What started it? And I also ask myself: am I simply taking out bitterness with my own educational and cultural experience, and also my own failures, on another group, instead of taking responsibility for them myself? Yes and no. Anyhow, I consider it not anti-Semitic, more like realistic, and in fact, I have interacted substantially with and highly regard many from that group. It is without doubt a remarkably high achieving group, often spectacularly so. This math PhD also well-versed in physics I talk to was also saying to me recently how Jewish accomplishment in mathematics and physics is absolutely overwhelming, which is indisputable. Of course, there’s also a darker side. I think I might have been inspired by this really smart guy who is a white Gentile (later atheist) American who doesn’t actually think I’m insane, or at least I hope not. Because once he was like:

You know what you should do? Become one of those food workers where rich Jews eat. Nobody cares about those people.

I actually told this to someone else, who was like: “that’s because they run things. If you ran things, you’d be the same.” When I told that guy about that, he was like:

counterpoint: other people have run things
some corruption is expected
Even the worst of the colonialist era was tempered
a lot of people were actually trying to do good
civilize the savages, that whole thing
that’s not saying there weren’t atrocities
because there were

And I was like, wow

So you’re saying the Jews now are worse
Than whites during the whole age of white/European imperialism/colonialism.
How much do whites regret letting Jews seize the positions of power

Him:

yes
norms have become nicer
so they can’t pull the old school shit
and more importantly
you’re not going to see the megadeaths from plague

Me:

So your argument is roughly that the calibration has to be much different now relative to the colonialist era, and Jews, by the current calibration, are pretty shitty.
About as shitty as the Belgians were in the Congo eh?

Him:

the belgians self-corrected
I mean, after killing a whole bunch of people
somebody said it was pretty fucked up
and the whole thing kinda fell apart
if we didn’t live in a post-colonial culture
they’d genuinely believe
that goyim are as cattle
and that they should do whatever it takes to ensure their rule persists
also the jews don’t want to exterminate
they need goyim to rule over
a world run by whites is one where half want to conquer and half want to help
a world run by chinese or japanese is one where they’d be rich and on top but mostly leave other people alone
other than getting money from them
a world run by jews is one where they’d systematically extinguish any hope of ending it
ITT anyone smart who’s not a jew would be a threat

Me (critically):

But plenty of smart Asians/whites have had Jewish advisors who strongly supported them
Recognized and cultivated their talent

Him:

this is a world with Jews who can openly be in power
not slink about in the shadows

Me:

That’s kind of theoretically impossible because Jews are too few
See because of that, they can only engage in deception
They’re evolved for that

Him:

look at Israel
they might be “evolved for deception” as you say
but that’s not stopping them from carrying out an effective, slow-motion genocide
which alone is scary
because sure, you can have one Hitler
you can have one Stalin
but you have multiple generations of Jews who are determined to exterminate the palestinians
you can’t have that kind of value alignment with white ppl

Me:

Do it slowly so that people don’t react to it as much, until it’s too late.
It’s like starving a person to death instead of blowing his brains out.
That’s what the Jews are doing to the Palestinians, it’s obvious

Him:

you should be scared because it suggest they’d do it to you too

Me:

Yeah they just don’t have the power to
I mean isn’t cultural assimilation also a form of more benign genocide of a culture
Didn’t whites also slow kill the Native Americans?
And got away with it 100%.
There’s also the saying that abused people are more likely to become abusers.
Doesn’t that sort of apply to the Jews too?

Him:

given the choice between future people who share my genes but an alien culture and future people who share my culture but alien genes I’m 100% for the former 0% for the latter
kicked out of 109 countries?

Me:

They regard that as abuse.
Anti-Semitism.
They may even feel nobody likes us because we’re too good.

Him:

I’m sure they tell themselves something like that

“boo hoo everyone’s evil and oppressive except for us”

What can I say? A smart white who sounds way more *anti-Semitic* than I am. Should I recalibrate according to him? Are Asians simply not aggressive enough? Is that why they are picked on so much by the media in America and not allowed in upper management in corporate America? I think he may be a bit overboard, but I might be wrong on that one. Or maybe he is exaggerating. Who knows. Anyhow, I find it somewhat flattering that he says he’d rather live in a world ruled by Asians than one ruled by Jews, because: less evil. So, considering his opinion, in combination with how shitty the American education system is, outlined above, maybe the group that I am part of really should try to take a more active role in world affairs and set a new standard and example. Lately, that has already been happening, very noticeably, and only time will tell how it pans out. Maybe I can be part of it too, who knows?

河殇

我在工作上网背景中听了《河殇》,88年央视拍的大争议,后被禁的六集电视纪录片。具体内容我就不多提了,可以自己上网上查,反正绝对是带有强烈的民族自卑感。我们先想一想这是什么时候。这是88年,临近六四的时候,是改革开放已进行一段时期开始面临问题的时候。

我有幸这些年通过阅读和与某些经过了解时代的人聊天对文革和改革开放有了更具体,更深入,更准确的理解。这些当然都是比较争议的话题,而对此片面表达甚多。不用说,对文革和改革开放西方学者和公共一般了解的莫名其妙,是明显带有政治偏见的。所以大多英文的关于此的资料应当置之不理。改革开放以邓小平为首的那派人是文革时所谓的走资派,是曾经被打下去而所谓的造反派代之的,文革后小平把华国锋不久政治碾压下去,而把如胡耀邦赵紫阳那样的人提拔上去了。所以不用说,改革开放的人是难以对文革这场具有悲剧性的政治风暴客观评价的。文革时期,在五一六通知发布之后,邓小平刘少奇或许感到此对己有危派了工作队阻止学校里的运动,这一点我相当肯定是毫无争议的,而可以说此导致了毛主席的不满及后他们的政治下滑,刘少奇被彻底否定并不久而逝,文革后得以平反,《河殇》我记得还特意怀念了他。

改革开放使得中国老百姓更加放眼世界尤其是美国为主的西方。纪录片提到了当时中国普通老百姓的平困,恰恰不同于西方及日本老百姓的繁荣富裕,此是不可争议的事实。不过,为此得结论此片是做的实在他快,太不理性。《河殇》主要引用地理决定论为解释,以中国的保守向内陆地地理与西方的活跃向外的海洋地理做对比,将后者之海洋视为促进此创造近代科技,跨越大海,横遍全球的必然结果,而将此代表后者固有的优越,前者固有的劣势。的确,这种说法有一定道理,而且我个人也经常以地理决定论思考分析历史的进程。为最代表性例子,在使得不少生物灭种的大冰期,在更寒冷的北方的人得到了更高智商及创造生存能力的进化筛选,使得人类发达到可创造农业和文字的智力巅峰,这是广泛被接受的理论。同时,在一本美国学者撰写的用地理及差异进化理解人类历史的,古希腊的在地中海之与美索不达米亚和埃及文明接近的独特地理位置也是被定论为该地为伟大西方文明发源地的主要原因之一。可是,虽然这种地理说法具有一定合理性,以此自卑是毫无意义的,而且把它与文革和毛泽东时代的”自我封闭“和资本主义民主制度之优越相连是非常之肤浅和荒谬的。

仔细看看中国在1980年的时候还算很贫穷,但可以说基本是一个现代的国家。在某些地方,中国其实已经相当先进了,这可以引两弹一星为代表。在建国的时候,近代科技还未在中国本土化可是到了70年,所有重要的科技方向基本上都有专家了,这一点的长远价值是比任何生活物质条件远远更高的。回顾而看,苏联和中国发生无产阶级革命是很有道理的。简单而言,他们都是极其落后的国家,尤其是中国。相反,西方列强尤其是英法早已占了不少世界的有资源和劳动剥削价值的殖民地,而工业革命在英国的起源也是使得大英帝国领先而起的主要原因之一。了解历史的人都知道在帝国殖民主义游戏,后进者德国日本在他们在军事上足够强大时,大多地盘已经被英法而占有了,所以他们不得不对此对手发动战争。俄国在西方列强算弱的,落后的,而1905年被西方列强不当回事儿的小东洋惨败而一落千丈。在这种国家才是开辟完全新的社会主义体制的天地,在资本主义先进列强的威胁下,斯大林不得不采取极端无情的利于快速工业化的计划经济,此毛主席领导的中国共产党后来也是学会并且成功执行了。中国在80年依然远远落后于美国和日本是不可避免的,不是可以归咎于社会主义体制的,反而是社会主义拯救了中国,让一个多年停顿于科技原始而百年受列强欺凌的华夏文明快速赢得了近代军力和科技力量,为此做出大大牺牲是不可避免的,不能占领剥削别人,就必定要勒紧自己的裤腰带。中国能在对外形势,在美国的封锁下,对自己极其恶劣不利的情况下成功快速的现代化是一个无可争议的历史奇迹,不是中国在此关闭了自己的国门,而是美国为首的西方在自己战争输给在他们眼中无比落后国家而不服导致美国引用经济制裁的方式企图推翻中国新的政权,将蒋介石老政权复辟,而在中共所领导的成功,其未得逞。

总而言之,可以说八十年代末是共和国最危险而有幸渡过的时候。苏联一垮台有接了一大串联,美国为此兴奋不已,终于赢了冷战,自由民主终于战胜了专制邪恶。但是此串联没有包括中国,中国尽然在自弱之时躲开了,而且出于西方所预料经过继二十多年之积累已经成为了下一个苏联,而且这个新苏联比往时的苏联远远更可怕。八十年代在中国出现的政治愚昧而危险自由主义浪潮即显示了当时中国人所有的弱小而产生的自卑崇洋媚外,又表明了毛主席文革时整掉的“走资派”后所展示出的肤浅与毫无远见并且其对共和国和中华民族所带来的严重但有幸而将其损害得以缓解的政治危机,现在看却给了所谓的十年浩劫一定的政治依据及合理性。

《河殇》的总撰稿人苏晓康六四后流亡美国,看来成为了相当公开彻底的中国政治异议分子,有在像自由亚洲电台这样的媒体进行采访,也和柴玲一样成为了虔诚的基督教徒。在看他的写作,的确容易发觉到他高水平的文笔(不考虑内容及其所含之立场),可是他也像那种典型的口若悬河缺乏严谨思维的高语言智商低数学智商的人。可是也许不然,像方励之那样的人,大理论物理学家,文数精通,也坚持过类似的不太奠定与事实的政治思想,表明还有对此占有相当大差的异于智商两大因素的非智商因素。通过这一点,我们也能更加意识到当时为什么强调又红又专,是有不少专业能力强但政治幼稚或别有用心的人可创造遭遇性的结果。大致而言,一个人的政治和道德价值观有环境影响的部分,也有先天的部分。我认为中国鼓励那些坚持而凭借一些在我眼中莫名其妙的政治原则闹事的分子到美国去是一个很明智的选择,他们可以在美国成立他们的集体,爱说什么说什么,爱宣传什么宣传什么,跟一些美国的某些政治组织勾结,沆瀣一气,也是他们的自由选择,只不过趋势看来会使得他们越来越无关。

还想强调的确,宣传和环境还是有相当大的作用的。我看到好多在美国长大的华人孩子形成一些不叫不太正确不符合事实的政治观点,因为他们太受美国媒体环境的影响了,若他们的克隆在中国长大就不会那样,当然的确也看到过一些彻底无救的而在繁殖的人。鉴于这一点,我认为我们具有更正确观点的人应当做出更多的努力为真实赢得话语权,而中国在这些年已经为此建立了越来越庞大的而还在快速增长的物质和精神支柱。

最后,我想说在《河殇》里,中华文明被形容为不敢于探索而知足常乐的民族,由于地理原因。不过那是在古代的未连接的世界,与今天飞机互联网的小世界截然不同。西方创造的近代世界却给了中国海洋,而在这号称中国没有海洋的纪录片在首播不到三十年之后,中国已经迈了大步,蓬勃的将自己的军队插入深之又深的海洋,这是三十年前难以想象的。孔夫子有曰:吾岂匏瓜也哉,焉能系而不食。中国已大大克服,而在继续克服《河殇》所描述的民族弊端,甚至有可能彻底改之而发展到另一个极端。或许,中国正在转化成昔日的日本,欲将西方军事从亚太地区彻底逐出。

美国名校为洗脑提拔(伪)精英华裔的政治工具

刚才,一位在斯坦福大学念过数学和物理(但之后转到计算机行业)的一位美国出生长大的华裔同龄(男性)却指责我为反犹,说其使他恶心。对此,我反驳:我对犹裔的巨大文艺科学贡献及才华是非常钦佩的,此我在我博客上经常提到,难道这是反犹的表现吗?他却无理的回以“你知道什么在你网站上”。

这个人是一个典型的对中国文化毫无认同或认识的ABC,他以前却跟我说过他不太读中文,并且他也说过一些对表示他对中国有相当严重之无知及误解。对这样的人无多可计较。我也想:这个人多么没有基本政治觉悟,他把一位华人批为反犹对它有利吗?可惜这样的相当聪明的(从智商角度而言)在美国的上了美国名校的华裔实在太多。说到这儿,我也提到过美国名校有一定鼓励亚裔申请生排斥自己文化的倾向,极其恶心,甚至是中国将来必要全面攻击的文化侵略!想起解放前,帝国主义在中国建立了一些培养狗崽子的基督大学,以圣约翰大学为显著之例。若读者觉得我这话带以中共政治宣传口气,请抱歉,莫以直译视之,的确那些大学也培养了不少优秀人才甚至历史人物,比如拼音创造者周有光,也对在中国传播西方先进知识产生了不可忽略的作用。同时,的确也有负面的。民国时期的好多国民党领导高官,如宋美龄,如孔祥熙,如宋子文,都是美国常春藤毕业,就看看他们把当时的中国搞成什么样啊,最后大败了,败到台湾去了。他们那些人都是比较盲目崇拜权威的人,缺乏任何独立思考或勇气,与共产党好多没有名校文凭的领袖截然不同,他们只不过是(伪)西化的华人,而且好多现在的美国名校华人,尤其是学文科的,与他们类似。在这一点,我想引用我很尊重的一位英国学者所描述的,其(原文链接)翻译到中文为

欧洲一直处于对自己造反的状态,并且继续如此。那些表面西化的华人以模仿及崇拜当时之西方价值观之体现将自己为正宗西华的华人的尝试只不过是彻底枉然的。只有抗拒当时西方价值观之体现,至少那些阻碍中国或者显得无关的才能成为真正的西化华人。所以至今为止,毛确是中国最好的西方人,尽管他对西方生活凡事之极其有限的接触。

在未来的文章,我会给以详解如何当时参观中共在保安和之后的延安的根据地的西方人发觉到在那里有在中国惟有的会在同样情况与西方人类似面对及表现的中国人。其他中国人可能能讲流利的英语,穿西装,并且有时展示出他们对西方文化非凡的知识,只不过这些皆为模仿而在精髓里是有异而无效的。回国的在西方所训练的工程师和地质学家对动手实际的工作依然保持距离,因为任何类似于体力劳动的工作会使得他们在中国知识分子眼中失去地位。他们是自孔子以来而无易的传统的囚徒。只有少数敢于冲破此古老之戒规,大多为共产党员和一些分散的在软弱中间派的左翼分子。而且是那些在共产党里的现代化华人选择将毛提拔为这个新认识的首要老师。

在美国从小学一年级到上完大学的我,据我广泛的观察,看到太多有在我们现在截然不同之时代之背景下具有类似倾向的进入美国精英教育体制的华人,大多当然都是在美国长大的,比如上所述之人,我也会定为一位此类之代表。而且美国的教育与环境,在文化和政治方面,是对此鼓励的。美国的文科真的没有什么太值得学的,他带有很多的不符合事实并且掩盖真相的政治文化扯淡,可以具体了解一些,可是一定要对它保持一定的,如对任何文化思想,批判性思维,尤其在历史已经明明验证它的危害可以是巨大的。我认识不少美国名校学生和校友,经常看到他们有一些非常不符合事实而片面的认识,大多由于他们某些客观历史知识的极度匮乏和他们太受制于某些文化权威势力的影响。美国名校的理工科大多是世界一流的,名师聚集,其它真没有什么好,而且经常对好的地方还有产生不良感染。即使理工科,美国的突出也只是在少数特别前沿的方向,他的本科及基础教育其实是有很多问题的,训练出来的人经常无法跟外国来的人竞争。

总之而言,中国人非常尊重西方文明,尤其是近代科学那一面,但是中国人也要坚定不移的维护独立而起的,并且对西方崛起起了决定性影响的(以造纸术和火药的向西传播为绝对无可争议之例)东方文明,这是人类宝贵的精神财富和真实的,全球试的文化多样(而非美国在内所提倡的虚伪的diversity)。西方精英多年对中国妄想毁坏的明显企图使得中国对西方无可心软,如果西方不愿意真实客观的对待中国,那中国也没有任何原因对西方太好。

西方现在面临一个困局,那就是好多华人精英,尤其在理工科都在美国,有些是名校教授,但是由于文化差异难以将这些人对美国的贡献视同己出,并且对他们有怀疑,不过把这些人留在美国还是总之有利的,因为不然,他们会在中国为他们崛起的祖国做伟大的贡献。同时,以将对中国竞争之希望寄托在第二代第三代身上为观,这些最佳华夏种子的孩子会在美国接触基本完全美国式的文化和教育,好多不会对中国文化有多少认同,以上述之人为例。改革开放时期中国就有明智远见之人为此担忧,现在已证明他们大部分是正确的,而中国一直无法解决人才流失的问题。在这一点,真的能看出毛主席的伟大,他能够吸引在海外顶尖华人人才放弃优越条件回到一穷二白的祖国,以中华复兴为己任,鞠躬尽瘁,死而不已。我也想到朝鲜战争对中华民族的心理振兴一点不差于六日战争对犹太人所产生的启发,其实可以说比它远远更强,远远更有长远历史意义。

毛主席时代中国物质条件及其之差,也有了不少内部政治遭遇和悲剧,可是无论如何,人民,包括精英,意志坚强如钢,死不屈服,而中国人在改革开放后却失去了不少这种不忘本而战无不胜的精神。不过,在习近平领导的这些年,华人越来越是在恢复原有的在危机情况所具备的民族骨气,说明毛主席厚聩了子孙,使得他的伟大精神和文化遗产永垂不朽,不可灭绝,将压迫者提心吊胆!甚至可以说中国人以毛泽东思想为指导方针继承了列宁所开创斯大林所巩固的伟大事业,苏联在修正主义所导致的衰退及灭亡证实毛主席当时的远见,他的历史地位随着时间的检验只会变得越来越高!

毛泽东领导的艰难斗争日子为中国赢得近代史上军事和外交的首次平等,赢得了中国改革开放进入融入国际体系的有利条件,让中国在强大对手巨大压力下保持了一定的独立自主的精神,让华夏文化持续其固有而非失去其精髓。鉴于西方社会在今天所面临的诸多问题,其已让不少人对在某些方面无比伟大的西方文明失去一定信心,这是为全人类做出了伟大的贡献,我相信历史会愈来愈为此而加强其验证。

中国最艰难的阶段已过,历史的惰性已几乎全面向着中国,中国要奋发图强,冲锋陷阵,气贯长虹,自信勇敢的创造人类新的巅峰,少在意外人的评价。原来中国多年极其落后,崇洋媚外已在中国人心里形成了一定习惯,可是要记住,中国人自从毛主席领导永远是革命家,革命家是自我觉醒,对不良过时习惯斗争的人,是为真理而奋斗的人,是脱离于低级趣味的人。

西方近年不少作为不得人心,体制面临不少难解之障,说明人类更需要中华文明占有首要的世界地位,此对西方也是长远有利的,就像西方崛起虽然对中国进行过无情侵略,但是他给全世界带来了近代的科学技术,把人类带到不仅前所未有而革命性彻底无法想象的繁荣,中国的崛起一直是通过对自己最合适的中西融合。

中国现在虽然经济强大了,科技军事也接近世界一流,但是文化影响力还相对之小,在海外得以广泛误解及排斥,此度到异国他乡长大的炎黄子孙对他们祖宗的文化不得接受,在这一点,所有明智的中国人需要为改变此不良现状作出更大的努力,敢于去宣扬中华文化,为此,中国现已通过前辈的刻苦奋斗积累了充分的支柱。

我个人非常看不起什么样的人?是那些缺乏自我认同为己之小利无耻舔屁股当牛做马的人。而据我所观察,好多在美国长大的华裔却是这样的人,而其缘故好多是美国社会对他们所产生的文化洗脑,他们无法逃避甚至坚守此樊篱,使得他们以事实上莫名其妙之观念视为寻常,要明知,美国洗脑是利用某些利益集团所创造之非政治正确而潜移默化左右人的,而同时对某些文化服从给以奖赏而腐朽人的心灵。

中国人要敢于大胆宣传更客观正确的事实和价值观,纠正批判错误的观念和荒谬的心态,在这一点,中国绝对能做的比西方国家好,我个人也写到过,中国人更尊重历史事实,更尊重实际依据,不善于西方习惯而置之等闲之无耻之流氓扯淡宣传行为。作为特例,美国大学文化及体质,此包括其录取制度,尤其是本科生的,已经出了不少大的问题,有好多不良非准确文化之宣传,此包括对亚裔之排斥,诬蔑,及嘲笑,所以赵宇空这样的勇士才要对它们进行斗争(当然,美国顶尖大学研究绝对是最牛的,教授是完全不同类人)。这些问题当然也延续到了美国的中学小学,导致现在美国学生吸收了不少错误的观念,在美国的华裔孩子也有受此之感染,而如上所述,即使在某些精英界,服从的人得以鼓励,不接受或排斥的人,如我,有得以过非人化,虽然我比他们远远更清醒,读到的知道的远远更多,也远远更多元化,而且考虑的也远远更客观。为什么在美国华裔不太爱学文科,因为美国的文科说白了好多都是垃圾,文化界也很垃圾,埋没于荒唐愚昧脱离现实之白左反共自由主义之政治正确文化。即使好多学理工科的人也都受到了这些影响,像我提到的那个人。 看到好多中国孩子,包括那个人,在美国受到这些的影响,真的让我感到很遗憾。这样的人我会偶尔建议他们读读中文,增加一下他们的知识,认识到美国所宣传的极其片面,读不懂可以用谷歌翻译,但是他们是听不进去这些的。

我想未来中国一旦强大,也会反过来施加类似的压力,此难以避免,而其已始,好像在澳大利亚已经这么做了,但是中国会朝着正确的方向走。坚持不认定客观真理的人是不应当得到好的对待,这是任何进步人必所坚持的原则。

最后想提到,我对那些敢于不惜公众反感的研究宣传智商的西方学者尊重钦佩不已。在此过程中,他们却都得到东亚人智商稍微高于白人的屡屡经过验证的结论。有一位还赞扬日本所创造的高效率,高创新,并且团结和谐的社会,以日本人高智商为其根本根源,并且说东亚人能够创造客观更好的社会秩序,此当然意味东方有好多值得学习的地方。还有一位早在01年发表的一本书就预料到中国将来会以其所有的高智商,大面积,多人口,和明智专制制度之综合将早晚成为世界超级大国并且控制世界,建立世界政府,我想那不就实现了类似于马克思一个半世纪多所预想的共产主义社会了吗。这听上去太遥不可及,而他01年中国国力不太强的时候就感这么说,自此十六年已过,事实发生只能说让他的猜测更加接近,仔细想,他这么说还真的有可能。这些人在西方主流被广泛拒绝,视为疯子,毫无政治影响力,而他们的被证实的远见不也可以算证实着西方文明的衰落吗?这些,不用说,都给以中国采取世界首位不断增加合理性。

总而言之,中国人要向西方好的地方学习,学习西方以古希腊人为先驱的刨根到底追求科学真理的精神,学习西方知识精英的勇于挑战权威的精神开创新视野的精神,使之进步,同时觉不能盲目,要保留继续发展自己文化好的地方,使之发扬光大!对于西方的腐朽政治文化,要敢于进行义无反顾的冲击,创造人类新纪元,创造革命性的人类文明巅峰!

Understanding Human History

I had the pleasure to read parts of Understanding Human History: An Analysis Including the Effects of Geography and Differential Evolution by Michael H. Hart. He has astrophysics PhD from Princeton, which implies that he is a serious intellectual, though it doesn’t seem like he was quite so brilliant that he could do good research in theoretical physics, though an unofficial source says he worked at NASA and was a physics professor at Trinity University who picked up a law degree along the way. I would estimate that intellectually, he is Steve Hsu level, perhaps a little below, though surely in the high verbal popularization aspect, he is more prolific, as evidenced by that book, among many others, such as one on the 100 most influential historical figures. He is active in white separatist causes (heh) and appears to have had ties with the infamous and now deceased Rushton.

Lately, with pardon for possible hindsight bias from reading, I have been more inclined to look at the world from a long term historical perspective. I have always had some inclination to believe that to judge an intellectual fully in terms of impact take decades and often generations, especially political ones. As a derivative to this, I feel I am, relative to most, less susceptible than most to fads and trends and care less about short term recognition and credentialism. The ideal is to let history be the judge, which it will be eventually and inevitably.

In this post, I’ll give a summary of what I would regard as some of the most prominent points in that book. Keep in mind though that I won’t strictly refer to the book and will instead draw from various sources online, with the book as more of an inspiration. To start, I recall reading as a kid that the Euphrates and Tigris rivers in Mesopotamia (modern day Iraq, Syria, Turkey) are cradles of civilization. On that, Hart was somewhat elaborate on the development of agriculture that took place there at least as early 11,000 BC. This was not soon after the last glacial period which many speculate vastly enhanced the intelligence of peoples in the more northern latitudes, particularly in Northeast Asian and in Europe, through brutal elimination of those unable to survive under the harsh demands brought forth to them in the cold winters. The earliest well-accepted evidence of writing appears to be again in Mesopotamia around 3100 BC. Around the same time, independent writing systems also arose in Egypt, but with that, historians and archaeologists cannot be sure whether it was truly independent, as the geographic proximity between Egypt and Mesopotamia was not large.

An independent civilization arose in China too, which was geographically isolated from the larger part of world. On its east (and to a less extent, south) is the Pacific Ocean, on its West are some of the world’s highest mountain ranges, and on its north are relatively barren lands. Respectively, agriculture and writing emerged in China not long after in Mesopotamia. The body of inscriptions on oracle bones from the late Shang dynasty gives the earliest evidence for what consensus would regard as genuine writing, which was around 1200 BC. There has been, though, an excavation dating back to as early as 6600 BC, of some form of proto-writing of the Peiligang culture. One ought to keep in mind that here we are talking about confirmed upper bounds in time, which will hopefully become tighter and tighter with time as more archaeological discoveries emerge and emerge. While we cannot definitely rule out that Mesopotamia influenced the development of writing in China, it is extremely unlikely that such was the case, due to the great geographic barriers.

I have had the pleasure of skimming through parts of the most classic of Chinese classics, including the I Ching, which are difficult to understand as one would expect. Those are the Chinese biblical equivalents. Unfortunately for history, the first emperor of China who unified all of China in 221 BC, preserving such unity by enforcing uniform weights and measures, ordered an infamous burning of books and scholars, which means that many priceless artifacts of Chinese civilization were forever lost, but of course, many books were able to escape his decree.

The Chinese did not develop an alphabet, as we all know. This was obviously disadvantageous in many ways, but it also enabled China to remain as one culturally, as languages with alphabets can more easily evolve. In China, there are mutually unintelligible dialects (such as Mandarin and Cantonese, which are still very similar in their oral form), but they all employ the same writing system unalterable. One can observe that the legacy of this persists deeply today with China unified and Europe very fragmented culturally and politically with the EU somewhat of a farce as a political organization according to many.

Hart shies away not from emphasizing the deep and revolutionary contributions to human civilization of the ancient Greeks totally merited. By far the most prominent and eternal of these was the development of the rigorous scientific method in its deductive form. The magnum opus of this is Euclid’s Elements, which was a compilation of propositions rigorously proven by his predecessor Greek mathematicians such as Thales and Pythagoras, who were pioneers of this great intellectual tradition that Western civilization and to a lesser extent Islamic civilization later on created and successfully preserved. Additionally, most certainly influenced by the Pythagorean mathematical tradition, the Greeks achieved substantially in geodesy and astronomy, with Erathosthenes calculating with an error of 2% to 15% the circumference of the earth using the differing angles the shadows from the sun made as the basis of his trigonometric calculations. From this, one can infer that by then, the Greeks already had well-established the sphericity of the earth. We even have evidence from The Sand Reckoner of Archimedes that Aristarchus of Samos (c. 270 BC) had proposed a heliocentric model in a work Archimedes had access to but has now been unfortunately lost. The English translation of that is as follows:

You are now aware [‘you’ being King Gelon] that the “universe” is the name given by most astronomers to the sphere the centre of which is the centre of the earth, while its radius is equal to the straight line between the centre of the sun and the centre of the earth. This is the common account (τά γραφόμενα) as you have heard from astronomers. But Aristarchus has brought out a book consisting of certain hypotheses, wherein it appears, as a consequence of the assumptions made, that the universe is many times greater than the “universe” just mentioned. His hypotheses are that the fixed stars and the sun remain unmoved, that the earth revolves about the sun on the circumference of a circle, the sun lying in the middle of the orbit, and that the sphere of the fixed stars, situated about the same centre as the sun, is so great that the circle in which he supposes the earth to revolve bears such a proportion to the distance of the fixed stars as the centre of the sphere bears to its surface.

The Greek were too rich and too farsighted in their scientific thinking and achievements, and I shall give no more concrete examples here for the sake of time.

This is in stark contrast to the Chinese civilization that Hart claims is the only one that can overall rival Western European civilization. Whatever scientific schools of thought, such as that of Mo Tzu, that existed were not well-preserved and eventually lost prominence to Confucianism, which did not emphasize rigorous scientific thinking, instead with an overemphasis on social relations of a more conformist nature that came with it an imperial examination system focused on literary topics for selecting people to govern the country. The ancient Chinese did not display much curiosity in the logical and natural world. Hart notes how even in 1600 AD, the Chinese knew far less than the Greeks in mathematics, and there is still as far as I am aware not of any evidence of widespread recognition of the round earth among Chinese scholars.

There is reason for a geographic explanation to this. Hart brings up the advantageous geographic position of Greece for its development of civilization. It was, on the Mediterranean, a maritime culture. It was, being further east than Italy, and thus in much closer cultural contact with the Mesopotamians, the cradle of civilization on the larger, non-Chinese part of the world. Additionally, it was close with Egypt. On the other hand, Chinese civilization was basically all to itself, contributing very crudely to somewhat of a less adventurous spirit, less curiosity about the outside world, and by extension, less curiosity about the natural world. Of course, what appears to be the lack of emphasis on theoretical matters of the ancient Chinese also has deep and far from well understood, owing to lack of complete picture due to loss of artifacts, roots. The location of the Greeks is not alone though. Hart also believes that the Greeks, being in a colder climate, had a higher IQ (or biological intelligence), which was what enabled them to surpass both the Mesopotamians and the Egyptians.

The Chinese brought to the world two major inventions that radically altered the course of history, which were uniquely and definitely Chinese. They were paper making and gunpowder. The papermaking process was invented by court eunuch Cai Lun in 105 AD. It was the first inexpensive medium for writing, as opposed to papyrus and bamboo, that enabled for China a great leap forward culturally. In 751 AD, some Chinese paper makers were captured by Arabs after Tang troops were defeated in the Battle of Talas River, and from that, the techniques of papermaking then spread to the West gradually, reading Europe in the 12th century. This is so impactful and impressive, because Western civilization was not able to uncover this critical process for over a millennia when they finally learned of it from outsiders. For this very reason, Hart put Cai Lun as number 7, right ahead of Gutenberg, inventor of the printing press in the 15th century in German. To justify that, he claims that Gutenberg would not have invented the printing press if not for paper, and that this invention being purely one of Chinese civilization that was transmitted to the West over a millennia later in addition to its history altering impact was not one that was inevitable in the sense of being a product of the historical epoch in which it came about. The Chinese also invented printing, with woodblock printing in the 8th century Tang dynasty and movable type (one for each character) by Bi Sheng in the 11th century. However, because of the thousands of Chinese characters as opposed to the tens of letters of the alphabet, movable type did not have anywhere as near of an impact. There is little if any evidence that Gutenberg was influenced in his invention by the one from China.

The importance and again pure Chineseness in invention of gunpowder is also without question. It revolutionized combat and was what enabled Europeans, with their improved guns, to later conquer the New World. Gunpowder was invented by Chinese alchemists in the 9th century likely by accident in their search for an elixir of life. The first military applications of gunpowder were developed around 1000 CE, and in the following centuries various gunpowder weapons such as bombs, fire lances, and the gun appeared in China. Gunpowder was likely transmitted to the Western world gradually via the Mongol invasions, which extended as far as Hungary.

The final of the so called Four Great Inventions of China not yet mentioned is the compass, which facilitated the voyages to Africa of Zheng He in the early 15th century. For that though, while very possible, there seems far from any conclusive that it spread to the Islamic World and Europe as opposed to be having been reinvented there.

Transitioning from China to the medium between China and the West, the Islamic world, we must delve into the Islamic Golden Age, traditionally dated from the 8th century to the 13th century, during which many important scientific discoveries were made. Though my knowledge of Islamic cultures is scant, I do know of Alhazen, Omar Khayyam, and Al-Khwārizmī. In particular, his seven-volume treatise on optics Kitab al-Manazir, while perhaps questionable on his theories of light, was notable for its emphasis on empirical evidence that combined inductive reasoning, which was relatively neglected by the Greeks, with the rigorous deductive reasoning that the Greeks championed to the extremes. We do know with certainty that this magnum opus was translated to Latin, greatly influencing later European scientists and thinkers as important as Leonardo Da VinciGalileo GalileiChristiaan HuygensRené Descartes, and Johannes Kepler. Moreover, Al-Khwārizmī’s work on arithmetic was responsible for introducing the Arabic numerals, based on the Hindu–Arabic numeral system developed in Indian mathematics, to the Western world. There is evidence of solid knowledge of trigonometry, with for instance the law of sines pervasive in the scientific literature from Islamic scholars of that time. With reference to Hindu, I shall note that Indian mathematics and astronomy were quite impressive, certainly more so than Chinese mathematics, which though calculating pi to 7 digits as early as the 5th century, which held a 900+ year record, among many other applied and computational achievements, was severely lacking in its theoretical foundations, was, with AryabhataBrahmaguptaBhāskara I, among others who did work close or on par with those of Islamic scholars mathematically but much earlier, between the 5th and 7th centuries. Because many foreign words are contained within their texts, we can be relatively sure that there was Greek and Mesopotamian influence. Relating to that, Hart does not see Indian or Islamic mathematics as terribly original and more as derivative of Greek works, with significance more in the nature of preservation, though with Western European civilization having been the dominant, and often entirely so, for so long, one ought to be careful of Eurocentric bias. The achievements of Indians and Arabs to math and science ought to be more thoroughly investigated and fairly acknowledgment, in particular how they may have influenced later developments in the West. On that note, I shall say that I was super impressed that in the 14th century, the school of Madhava of Sangamagrama managed to discover infinite series for trigonometric functions of sine, cosine, tangent and arctangent. As a special case of arctangent, we have that

{\frac {\pi }{4}}=1-{\frac {1}{3}}+{\frac {1}{5}}-{\frac {1}{7}}+\cdots +{\frac {(-1)^{n}}{2n+1}}+\cdots,

which was later rediscovered by Leibniz. This of course hints or indicates that Madhava already knew at that time some form of proto-calculus, with as a concrete example Rolle’s theorem, which his predecessor from the 12th century Bhāskara_II had already stated. It’s possible that knowledge of these results were transmitted to Europe, but online sources stay that no evidence for that has been found. This probably influenced Hart’s verdict that Indian/Hindu civilization, while superior to China’s in theoretical science, was far less influential, with of course, India’s having received some knowledge of the Greeks, whereas the Chinese developed independently, with Euclid’s Elements only translated to Chinese in the early 17th century, where it, unfortunately for China, did not have the impact it should have had.

We all know that the West created the modern world, with the Renaissance, the scientific revolution, and the industrial revolution, and discovering, conquering, and colonizing more and more of it with their superior ships and guns, white Europeans virtually ruled the entire world by the late 19th century, ushering in unprecedented growth revolutionary in its quality and exponential in its quantity. It has continued to the point of air travel and internet communications that has drastically reduced the distance between cultures and peoples, with racial intermixing and immigration ever more common and accepted, though of course, the majority still live and mix with their own, in their ancestral homeland.

So, despite being non-white, I shall out of my respect for reason and reality publicize my well-justified view that white supremacy is, or at least was, too manifest not to be believed in. Not too long ago, white European civilization has essentially been in a completely different league from the rest, miles ahead in its content enough to give an appearance of white man’s being a higher species than the rest, with the rest of the world more or less compelled to learn the ways of the West. Of course, being ahead in terms of accumulation of culture, knowledge, and technology does not imply biological superiority, of which IQ is the best proxy. On that, it is well established within the scientific community on the matter that East Asians have a slightly higher IQ than white Europeans, with the advantage largely being in math and visuo-spatial. This is solidly evidenced by the success of Japan and later China, and to a lesser extent South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore. The Japanese of the late 19th century were uncertain with regard to whether they could do modern science and compete with Westerners, but not long after, they came to the realization that they were not bad, with their decisive defeat of the Russians in 1905 referenced in Hart’s book. By WWII, Japan was basically an advanced country and had also produced some truly groundbreaking work in pure science at home with Takagi and Yukawa as their pioneers for mathematics and physics respectively. The Chinese students who studied in the West in some mass after China’s defeat in the Boxer Rebellion in 1900 also did quite well, though China internally was only able to modernize rapidly after the establishment of the PRC ended the instability and destruction of war at home that had plagued China for over a century, which it did very rapidly and successfully. By the 1940s, there were already quite a handful of Chinese doing revolutionary or at least first-rate work in science, particularly in mathematics, exemplified by Hua Luogeng and Shing-Shen Chern. By 1970, in spite of starting from near ground zero a few decades ago, China already had thermonuclear weapons and a satellite in orbit, notwithstanding little trade with the West following the Korean War and a later break with the Soviet Union. Now, not even 50 years after that, many people in the West are quite scared of what appears to be China’s supplanting the US as the world’s number one and thereby bringing legitimacy to a civilization with cultural values and political systems very different that evolved independently of the rest of civilization, and this is in fact what the infamous race realist scholars like Rushton and Lynn have predicted would happen largely on the basis of the higher IQ of East Asians that they to some extent popularized. Of course, this is far from absolute, with for example that the Jews (who are basically white, Western) have measured an IQ higher than East Asians of a greater magnitude than the difference between East Asians and (non-Jewish) whites. Hart, being Jewish himself, shies away not either from citing the plethora of world-changing Jewish contributions to science and culture in Europe, the United States, and Russia/Soviet Union from the 19th century on. We can see that the two superpowers, the US and the USSR both depended tremendously on the Jews for solving their hardest technical problems. For instance, the nuclear weapons programs of both countries, especially in theory, were filled with Jews, with Hans Bethe, Edward Teller, Yakov Zel’dovich, and Vitaly Ginzburg as examples. It is even fair to say that to some extent the 20th century was the Jewish century.

For the 21st century, Hart also predicts that the breakthroughs will be achieved mostly by white Europeans (that includes Jews) and East Asians, and we already see that happening. I do not recall his stating that the East Asian civilization represented mostly by China and Japan have been on rapid rise lately, and I shall surely point that out, out of what I regard as both its reality and significance (as opposed to any ethnic chauvinism on my part). It is the formerly weak but now strong and still rapidly strengthening other side of human civilization that is less fairly acknowledged, though with its rise, that will gradually change, just as the rise and later sheer dominance of the West enabled it to easily impose its standards and culture on others regardless. With mathematics again as the representative for the pinnacle of human civilization, we can see how very recently Yitang Zhang stunned the world by proving infinite bounded gaps between primes and Shinichi Mochizuki is receiving ever more press for the inter-universal Teichmüller theory that claims to solve the abc-conjecture, one of the most important problems in number theory, the queen of mathematics (according to Gauss), that could possibly becoming one of the most important new mathematical theories of the 21st century. On that, my friend once remarked: “Mochizuki could be the 21st century Grothendieck!” It is quite remarkable and also surprising that the culture and civilization for which theoretical science had been a glaring weakness historically is now verging on its apex, though the surprising part is less so when one takes IQ into account, with now the cultural factors more controlled for owing to the near universal access to information provided by the Internet. Additionally, China is excelling at and amazing, with some effect of disease, the world at what it has traditionally been strong at, namely large-scale engineering projects, but this time, of a nature guided by the modern science of the West. As examples, we see the world’s fastest trains in a nation-wide network, the world’s largest genome sequencing factory, and a great wall of sand dredged on the South China Sea. They are modern Chinese parallels of the Great Canal, the Great Wall, and the mega ships of Admiral Zheng He an order of magnitude larger than those of Columbus. Comes unity comes strength, or so the saying goes. It is one that persists in Chinese civilization today that is enabling more in China what the West cannot do, in practice.

There are scholars and advocates who lament that Western civilization, threatened by dysgenic immigration among other things, is in decline, and that its culture and civilization, which includes a certain purity of its people, ought to be preserved, which includes Hart himself. Given the overwhelming contribution of the West to human civilization, with Greek and Latin roots, has contributed to human civilization, one cannot not identify somewhat with this point of view. On this note, Rushton has even hypothesized that the Black Death precipitated the Great Divergence by suddenly and drastically enhancing the gene pool through killing off a quarter and as much as a half in some places of the European population via more or less a freak accident, one that has been regressing ever since to its natural level. It is somewhat unfortunate in some sense that the horrific legacy of Nazism, which was such that many Western peoples began to outwardly oppose ideas of racial superiority, has developed up to today towards a form of irrational racial egalitarianism and SJW culture that denies any honest, scientifically objective discourse on race differences, which are patently there, which we have the ability now to examine vastly more closely, powerfully, and scientifically than in Hitler’s time that is so politically obstructed for the aforementioned reason. Having referred to dysgenics, I shall also note that the technology and globalization we have today we are rather evolutionarily maladjusted to. Foremost of all, with reference to modern medicine, evolution does not let the weak live or spread its seed, and moreover, evolution is not terribly suited for vastly multi-ethnic societies either. The world now exhibits so much more mercy than before, often at the expense of the advancement of civilization. Yes, we know and have much more than our ancestors, but are we biologically superior to them? Perhaps we are at the far far tail, which increasingly breeds assortatively, but overall, I would say almost certainly not.

As for the 21st century, how it will pan out, only time will tell. However, if I were to bet, I would say that its winner and its legacy, viewed from the long term historical perspective, say a millennia from now, will be whoever musters the courage to control our own evolution to take us beyond the confines of Homo sapiens, so extraordinary and yet so limited in its might, and also at times also so foolish in its wisdom.

To conclude, my message to my generation and the future of humanity, inspired partly by Bertrand Russell:

Be rational! Be tolerant, but not of mindless PC! Dare to create new heights! Dare to improve the human race!

On questioning authority

A couple years ago, my friend who won high honors at the Intel Science Talent Search told me that he was talking this guy who created some app that allows you to schedule a Uber ride for later, who was also at/near the top of the same science competition, who is extraordinarily versatile and prolific. I watched a little of a video of a TED talk he gave, wherein he explained what one can learn from ancient Hebraic texts. Overall, I wasn’t terribly terribly impressed by it, though it was quite eloquently delivered. Mostly because with those types of things, one is too free to interpret and thus, the lessons/messages given were overly generic so as to make them almost meaningless, one of which was how the Bible teaches the importance of questioning authority, with reference to the refusal to bow to the golden image of King Nebuchadnezzar by Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego as an exemplary.

Here, Joshua like many from the same cultural root portrays questioning authority as a pillar of the Jewish moral and intellectual spirit. I would say that this has already gotten to the point of cliche. There is also, again, that people have different ideas of what it means to question authority.

First of all, what is an authority? An authority can manifest itself in many forms. It can be a political authority. It can be a government, especially a “dictatorship,” as much as I hate the usage of that word. It can be a boss at work. It can be a distinguished professor. It can be an adult when you’re a child. It can be an official or not moral, religious, or political code/ideology, or commonly accepted versions of history and its verdicts, by which I mean judgments of history as opposed to hard facts more or less incontrovertible, such as what exactly happened on X day with documentation abound. It can be the tradition we are all taught to abide by growing up with little question of their rationale and relevance, especially as times pass and change.

A corollary of my last paragraph is that to talk about questioning authority alone is almost utterly meaningless. You absolutely need some context, and Joshua did provide some. In the specific example of his I regurgitated, it is standing up against a dictator, and I’ll elaborate my thoughts on that.

Growing up in America, in my social studies classes and in the media, the mantra of dictatorship vs democracy with the latter morally superior and in many cases with its defense by virtually any means justified was heard again and again that it has itself become an authority taboo to challenge by our political norms. First of all, I want to clarify that here by democracy I am referring to a political system where elect representatives from among themselves to form a governing body. There is another form of more general democracy where the government does what is, or is at least perceived as, in the best interest of the entire nation or populace. What American political culture fails to discuss sufficiently is the vital matter of to what extent the former democracy implies the latter one, with the latter’s being, hopefully, the end goal.

In contrast, dictatorships are portrayed as one lone, usually brutal dictator having absolute power, being able to order virtually anything, and thus, leading often to genocidal regimes with mass murderers such as Hitler, Stalin, Mao, etc. This image may be tempting to many but it is in reality rather ridiculous. Yes, a dictator has enormous power and stays at the top often for decades, in contrast to the four year term system in America, which is very frowned upon in our culture, but surely, a dictator is not politically omnipotent. He has plenty of people underneath that he needs to satisfy, and though he may have a cult of personality within the propaganda, people are basically free to ignore him and go about their own business. He is also a human too, just like you, with very human interests, though sure, he may be a psychopath of some sort. There is also a vital point that almost always for a dictator to come to power, he must have a high degree of support from a large number of people, and thus, dictators in practice have little incentive to work against people’s interests, with getting people to like him being largely in his interest. Ironically, dictatorships can be very good at motivating people to achieve great things and providing certain continuity and long-term perspective difficult within a system where the people can easily choose to elect a new leader. In fact, if I have someone pressuring or forcing me when I don’t want to to do what is good for me (like waking up early on a weekend) and good for the society at large (like not being a parasite), I consider that to be a very positive thing. On this note, talking with someone in China recently, that guy was like: China now has 10 year terms for leaders, and maybe it should be gotten rid of, because it’s too little time for a leader to do anything serious, as he would have to pass the torch before he can be finished. Maybe Xi Jinping should try to extend his presidency past his 10 year term. Even in America, during WWII, Roosevelt was president for 16 years.

I personally love reading and watching controversial and sensitive material that most people dare not to. I’ve read plenty of material in Chinese banned in the mainland (but of course, still easily obtainable there if one really wants), most memorable of which was the very well-written, of high literary quality, autobiography by 巫宁坤 (Wu Ningkun). I’ve watched an anti-Semitic Nazi movie and also a North Korean movie out of sheer curiosity of certain places so smeared by our media. I also think that Soviet music is some of the most beautiful music out there. I have also, not surprisingly, watched some PRC (propaganda) movies from the 50s and 60s, which I felt were very well-made. The scariest and most grotesque movie I watched was one on the WWII Japanese human experimentation camp, Unit 731. A few weeks ago, I also had the pleasure of watching Saving Private Ryan, which I also much enjoyed, though surely it’s, as a Hollywood movie, more or less well-accepted here on our soil, unlike some of the previous ones, for which many would think I’m crazy, which I’m obviously not, for watching. I would say that this is out of a combination of my political intellectual curiosity and a distaste for certain oppressive, intolerant mainstream views and norms in America. Shaped by these explorations, I am of the belief that people should be more tolerant of differences and more politically and culturally open-minded. Be emotionally insensitive and let others be who they are. Also, be reasonable, precise, and stick to the facts. This is a concrete and substantive characterization of how throughout my life, I have challenged and questioned authority in the political intellectual domain.

Joshua is obviously promoting his own Jewish culture in that TED talk. On this, I’ve come to note that Jews in America are for the most part entirely unashamed, if not eager, to display and extol their culture. This is in contrast to Chinese who grow up here, many of whom try to distance themselves from their roots. Well, I guess there are self-hating Jews (like Bobby Fischer, who I feel I can understand much more now, with where he’s coming from) as well, but overall, they seem far less conspicuous. I believe the latter is out of a combination of their lack of self-confidence, the gross bastardization of Chinese culture in America, and the difficulty of learning the Chinese language in an American environment even when parents speak it at home, especially the written aspect.

There is the cliche saying that Chinese people in general, due to certain elements deep-rooted in Chinese culture, are very deferential to authority, which stifles creativity and innovation. I’ve surely thought about this and my views have evolved over time the more I’ve learned and seen. It is obviously too simplistic a notion presented by those of meager and often incorrect understanding. I do believe that Confucianism had and still has a strong element of the phenomenon described, but so did Christianity, just of a very different character.

Personally, I have to say that the more I learn, the more impressed I am with the fearless and pure spirit Chinese people have displayed in questioning and challenging authority, especially in the 20th century. I have written here before that I believe China has the richest revolutionary history of the 20th century of any nation or culture, with that of course much owing to the circumstances. China in the 20th century, being in deep trouble, had a dire need for revolutionaries, martyrs, and heroes. With this, the Chinese led by the communists essentially created a new Chinese culture on top of the traditional Chinese culture that had Confucianism as the guiding ideology. There is now a rich tradition and culture of Chinese communism, especially in military and social science, that has become holy in some sense, as is Jerusalem, which became so also out of certain formational historical events, that is very revolutionary in its essential spirit. However, the Chinese being materialists view all this as a force of nature rather than a force of God, a key contrast to holiness in the Abrahamic religions.

Another essential difference is that while Jews have more or less based themselves upon the Western system, having taken great advantage for themselves of the Western imperialism that came out of the discovery of modern science in the West, which they are also in service to politically, with reliance on it, the Chinese have more or less created an independent system from the West without kowtowing to pressures to conform, which has proven to be a correct decision, one that took much political courage and belief in oneself. The foundation for modern China was built largely in the 50s and 60s with little direct exchange with the West, if one excludes the Soviet Union from that, and in certain cases direct confrontation, with the freeze in relations owing to that in the Korean War, the Chinese challenged the Western authority successfully in a military setting in a way unimaginably shocking. It is only now very much in hindsight that while that inability to trade with the West for a few decades very much delayed China’s economic growth in certain respects, it brought about the creation of a very distinctive political culture and system deeply embedded that remains distanced from the mainstream in spite of reform and opening up, of a nature that may well be an advantage for China in the long term if not already. In this respect, Chinese culture has produced a feat and tradition of questioning authority that will forever live in our historical memory.

Another that I have noticed is the upright dedication to truth exhibited at large by Chinese scholars in the often corrupt and political social sciences that become authoritative, relative to those in the West. It is a reflection of good judgment of the Chinese people on who to promote in that arena. It does have much to do that China has in modern times been humbled by and learned so much from the West, the source of the most unprecedentedly radical and explosive growth in human history, but I also dare say that it is an indicator of very high moral character of Chinese civilization. In Chinese intellectual and media circles, bullshitting and falsifying history for political motives seems much more frowned upon. I believe that in this respect, history will eventually look at what the West led by America, that is heavily influenced by Jews in the social sciences, has done with utter disgrace, with various facades unlikely to continue indefinitely.

Speaking of truth, in terms of scientific truth, Chinese civilization has, however, contributed very little in comparison, though surely, Chinese produced a good number of revolutionary scientific breakthroughs in the 20th century, especially later in it. I find it somewhat odd how it is seldom said directly in the West that modern science is a product almost entirely of Western civilization with Greek roots and later Islamic preservation and expansion. Because scientific achievement requires so much in the way of the quality that is the subject matter of this article, surely the Confucianism based Chinese civilization has experienced a dearth of it of a nature that was only learned from the West later on. Now, Chinese are indeed quite relieved and also proud that in STEM, they have been increasingly successful and are now on the verge of reaching a world leading position, with much more to contribute to the world.

I’ll conclude with the following message. If Jews value questioning authority so much, they should let their authorities in media in America be freely and openly challenged. They should let their majority representation among Ivy League presidents and senior administrators be questioned too. In anything that is not terribly meritocratic and more connections and reputation based, their gross overrepresentation often well over 30%, so long as is objectively there, ought to be seriously questioned.

 

 

My awesome roommate

I recently met this cool guy because we live in the same place. Though he’s not that nerdy (by that, I mean super mathy), we still share many common interests. For instance, he expressed interest when I told him a bit about 艾思奇(Ai Siqi). Additionally, he told me about his appreciation for André Weil and Simone Weil, particularly her mysticism, which I found quite pleasing as I was reading about them not long ago. He also told me about this guy who is trying to understand Mochizuki’s “proof” of the abc conjecture despite being not long out of undergrad, who has plenty of other quirks and eccentric behaviors. Like, that guy joined some Marxist collective, and goes on drunken rants at 3 am, and is in general “aspie af,” something that he described me as too when messaging that guy himself. There is also: “he would literally kill himself if he had to do a tech job.” (laughter) That guy’s dad happens to be a (tenured) math professor from mainland China, more evidence that madness runs in families.

The guy that is the topic of this post himself did up to high school, as far as I know, in Hong Kong, so we have some more in common than usual culturally I guess. He was just telling me about how he had read 矛盾论, which I haven’t even read, at least not in detail, myself. He was saying, on the putative connection between scientific talent and Marxism, perhaps how dialectical materialism is inherently a very scientific way of thinking. I myself know basically nothing about dialectical materialism and even think it’s kind of high verbal low math bullshit, but I can tell that the materialist side of it is very scientific in its very nature, and similarly, dialectics is a very analogies/relationships way of thinking, which is something that high IQ people are by definition good at. Surely, there is much more I can learn from this guy, especially about Chinese language and culture and politics.

On this, I am reminded of another amateur (but professional, or better, level for sure) Marxist scholar, who is genuinely encyclopedic in his historical and cultural knowledge, in particularly a perceptive quote of him that made a deep impression on me:

Europe has always been in rebellion against itself, and continues to be so.  There was nothing but futility in the attempt by superficially Westernised Chinese to be authentically Westernised Chinese by being imitative and reverential of the current embodiment of those values.  You could only be an authentically Westernised Chinese by being a rebel against the current embodiments of Western values, at least in as far as they hampered China or seemed to be irrelevant.  And that’s why Mao was China’s best Westerniser to date, despite his very limited experience of the mundanities of Western life.

As I’ll detail in a future article, visitors to the Chinese Communist bases at Bao’an and later Yen’an noticed that these were the only Chinese in China who behaved more or less as Westerners would have behaved in a similar situation.  Other Chinese might speak good English, wear Western suits and sometimes show considerable knowledge of Western culture: but it was all imitation and the inner core was different and ineffective.  Western-trained engineers and geologists who returned to China kept their distance from hands-on practical work, because anything resembling manual labour would have lost them status in the eyes of Chinese intellectuals.  They were imprisoned by a tradition stretching back to Confucius and beyond.  Only a few broke these ancient taboos, mostly the Communists and some scattered left-wingers in the weak middle ground.  And it was the modernised Chinese in the Communist Party who chose to raise up Mao as the prime teacher of this new understanding.

I remember when my obsessively talented Russian friend once said to me that sometimes he feels like he’s another Pavel Korchagin, I thought he was ridiculous. Well, I’ll be equally ridiculous and say that I feel like I very much exhibit what Gwydion described in Mao that is “authentically Westernized Chinese,” which is very much the antithesis of what I see in most ABCs, despite being half an ABC myself.

If only more people could be like me…

艾思奇与中庸之道

昨天,我对艾思奇这个人有所探索,稍读了读他的哲学著作,其中有《中庸之道的分析》和《意志自由问题》。先想想艾思奇这个人我是如何得知的。好像是通过读谷超豪的中文维基百科页,其提到谷超豪中学时就组织读马列主义的学生读书会,而艾思奇就是他们所读的作者之一。我可能是稍微搜了搜关于艾思奇的资料,可未对其有任意甚查。谷超豪这种天才级别科学家曾有过对马列主义发生兴趣我想绝对不是偶然的,因为据我所知,马列主义是吸引过太多科学家,数学家,此对马列主义为更先进的社会科学有所隐式。Ron Maimon甚至对我说过科学与马克思主义文化上是本质上不可脱离的,甚至是唇齿相依的。我可以想到一位出了三位大数学教授的兄弟之家庭,父亲竟然是美国共产党在30年至45年的主席,厄尔·白劳德,还可以想到Steve SmaleNeal Koblitz,而这些都是美国人,中国人就更不用说了。

如果将鲁迅为中国革命最代表性文人,那同样可以将艾思奇为中国革命最代表性哲人,他的思想深深影响了一代革命家并且进入了实践,将革命引导以正确的方向。尽管目前自己对思奇同志了解还不多,但至少可以对我已阅过的他所写的《中庸之道的分析》某些内容表达一些我的看法。先说我最中庸之道只有很粗略的了解,对源之之孔子之作也未读过,即使读过它也早已从记忆而消失。我在我博客上早一篇谈到我对儒家没有太正面的看法,觉的他过于保守,扼杀了中华民族的创造力,使得在近代科学已在西方文明萌芽以及突飞猛进时,中国还埋没在落后无知的封建社会,无法脱离跨域儒家对中国社会诸多的恶性制约,直到中国被西方欺负蹂躏到山穷水尽的地步,形势才有所转变。以希腊哲学为基础的西方哲学具有非常之深的理论科学基础所在,而以孔孟之道为基础的东方哲学毫无科学眼光或精神,竞谈一些作人治国这种在我们做高智商的学科的人眼里没有什么实质的话题,可以说它从某种角度而言类似于美国商业文化的那套扯淡,只不过以完全不同的形势和观点。中国人这么聪明选了孔孟之道为社会的指导方针可以说是一种遗憾,幸好对此对过时的地方近代的中国是有所摆脱,已打碎了它大多的绊脚石。我最后想说我觉不是对儒家全盘否定,他有他好的一面,这我就不在这儿谈了。

在此文章,艾思奇主张中庸之道是绝对不利于革命的,是反动的。这一点我觉得毫无解释,中庸温和是无法创造任何奇迹,无法使得中国脱离当时的悲惨处境,也无法让中国在极其落后在内对外形势非常不利的情况下得以最紧要的现代化,其实做出任何不得了的颠覆性的事情都需要特别极端的作为,有这种基因潜力的华人其实不少,但是传统中国文化无法充分的激发它,甚至对它有束缚,某些观念是对跨越式的作为强烈反对的。艾思奇在其文章将甘地的消极抵抗主义化为一种中庸之道式的无效之表,这一点绝对没错。我的极有才华的就读超弦论博士的印度朋友曾经跟我说过他希望印度是有了中国式的暴力革命,而非以非暴力,相对和平的方式使得英国人懒得坚持而离开而解殖谋取(名义上的)独立,原因是这种获取独立的方式未能消除印度诸多好多与殖民直接相连的根深蒂固的痼疾,所以之后虽然印度外表独立可是实质非其也,殖民心态依然保持为坚。西方列强之所有能够跨越大海,掠夺奴役殖民,明显由于他们所发展出的枪炮,这跟毛主席所说的”枪杆里出政权“是一致的,从而不承认强军为胜者都是在犯严重的道德主义谬误。

崇洋媚外也可以被视为一种中庸之道的行为。西方国家和白种人具有的综合性的先进以及先驱地位使得他们的一切被看我默认的权威,这包括他们的政治制度,甚至他们的宗教信仰,而挑战疑问权威本质上就是一种反中庸之道的作为。中庸之道之者不敢做的太离经叛道,或表太不符合广泛被接受而非政治正确之言,难以从自己所在的环境以及教育所潜移默化对此施加的”正确观点“之樊篱得以思想心灵解放。中庸之道之患者难以超越时代超越权威。西方媒体经常说中国缺乏创造性,而中国所开创并坚持的独特的不受过多西方主流影响的经济及政治制度在它一直保持成功蓬勃发展甚至超越的情况下客观上就是伟大的颠覆性的创新,这一点表示在中国共产党领导下的中国已经相当成功的混合了中国传统文化和其所发展积累的新文化,抛弃了中庸之道将不利产生弊病及故障的许多,这是不得了的成就!

还想到近几年,在美国开始生成组织强烈反抗美国名校对亚裔学生的歧视,及不透明的,偏向富贵子弟的而忽略贫困孩子的组织,其显著之一就是赵宇空所领导的美国亚裔教育联盟。此之外,赵宇空不仅是非常成功的大公司经理及领导,还是一位作家,撰写了《华人成功的秘诀》这本书,在此讲说儒家文化传统的优点以及其对华人所带来的好处,有立志,勤学,节俭,顾家,择友为列。没有想到鉴于中庸之道为儒家文化要点之一,在我前段所表示的观点的背景下,却得到矛盾了!(当然,这绝对不是数理逻辑严谨标准的矛盾,体现到哲学是多么主观,多么复杂,多么多元化。)

总而言之,读艾思奇的《中庸之道的分析》给了我丰富的反思从而引发了我又一篇具有(我希望)正确引导思想的文章。盼望有机会多读艾思奇的著作,从而激起更多有深意价值的新思想,新启发!

Japan

I watched part of this documentary on Japan in WWII. It is a very high quality one, with many personal remembrances of various Japan individuals, from high-ranking politicians and military men to schoolchildren, on their experience spoken in Japanese accented English. (No film experience on my part, but I can most certainly guess that many if not most of those were acted as opposed to real.) I believe it depicted rather realistically the Japanese perspective of the war.

Many individual Chinese openly express detest of Japan for obvious reasons, and in China, it is in some sense taught that Japan is pure evil. Kids will believe that. As one matures, one can of course develop a more realistic and less emotional perspective on the matter. Of course, there are many in China with family members who were killed or suffered tremendously under Japan, which has the most barbaric military culture of any country in the world, and thus, the reaction to Japan is bound to be traumatic and emotional, especially for the older folks.

I actually know little about Japan and am eager to learn more. I’ve never been there, aside from the Narita airport, which doesn’t count. I am increasingly impressed by Japan, by its ability particularly in science and technology. There is the popular stereotype (in China as well) that Japanese are uncreative copycats (they stole Chinese characters) and later they modernized learning from the West, but such is obviously not so given the plethora of original, and in some cases groundbreaking, creations by Japan since they have been an advanced country, which one can put as the 1930s. The masses see directly Japanese cameras and cars, and also their anime, and the elite intelligentsia are well aware of their contributions to pure science (on that, Japan has won sizable chunk of the Nobel prizes since 2000).

Japan modernized very rapidly and successfully with the help of the West. At that time, which was second half of 19th century, it was clear that the West was leagues ahead, having developed modern science, and later modern, industrial technology. By then, not surprisingly, Japan was obsessed with learning from the West (seeing what the defeated and colonized non-Western people of the world, especially China, were suffering), and initially, for good reason, Japanese were not sure they could ever compete with Westerners. As they made progress, doubts on that gradually dispersed, and expectedly, Japan defeated China in 1895, which devastated the Chinese national psyche much more so than did the repeated losses to the Western powers did, on the basis that China historically had always seen Japan as this puny country much as its vassal, which had relied on her as its cultural mother. Needless to say, Japan became the undisputed king of Asia after that, taking over both Taiwan and Korea. Japan experienced a tremendous boost in international status and confidence in itself when it prevailed in the Russo-Japanese War in 1905, against a white, Western power, which was a huge deal at the time when white supremacy was the norm, for good reasons. That also inspired greatly the so called colonized and subjugated colored peoples of the world.

Nonetheless, the Western powers refused to treat Japan as an equal. From my limited knowledge, they made it such that Japan, despite being the victor, did not get very favorable peace terms. The same was in the aftermath of WWI. Japan was obviously resentful that the West treated it as inferior despite all the evidence that Japan was as advanced and competent as the West was, and perhaps more so in some respects. I still recall reading in this silly American grade school textbook: “Japan beat the Europeans at their own game.” So, Japan, very naturally, viewed WWII as a necessity to further prove and assert itself, and justified it on the basis of liberating Asia from Western colonialism and domination. Even though Japan lost that war, it had demonstrated itself more than formidable in cases such as the Battle of Singapore, fighting a fully modern war centered on Navy and Air Force that they lost largely owing to lack of resources and men, such that the West could not but recognize it, despite their being foreign and a latecomer.

Again, post-war, Japan stunned the world with their “economic miracle” that is well represented by the pervasion of its cars and electronics through global (that includes first-class, Western) markets, and it is regarded by many in the West familiar with it, such as Jared Taylor, as one of the best run places on earth. There was some panic in the 1980s in America pertaining to that.

It is apparent that now, Japan, as impressive as it is, has peaked, having endured a so-called Lost Decade and faced competition against its high-tech products from South Korea and now China that cut away some of its market share, further contributing to their decline in economic growth. Still, in absolute terms, it is without doubt that Japan is very high up.

We all know in WWII, Japan easily took over China’s cities with modern against primitive, and it could not win the war against China mainly due to the vast size, as well as the geographic barriers, of mainland China, coupled with their being outnumbered. It was impossible to Japan to control the smaller, rural areas in China, where there was of course a popular anti-Japan resistance. I find it rather ironic that it was China, as weak and backwards as it was, managed to fight America to a stalemate, winning the North Korean side of the war, only 6 years after the end of WWII, when there were still like a million Japanese soldiers in China. That war though, in stark contrast to Japan vs America in WWII, was mainly a land one, one where numbers and human fighting ability mattered more and military technology less. Owing to that, China faced a very different and much fiercer international discrimination and obstacle than Japan had, but it was able to triumph through it miraculously, and that was a much more of a miracle than the Japanese post-war economic miracle. In 1964, China became the first Asian nuclear power. Though at that time, China was still for the most part behind technologically, it is fair to call that the point when China reclaimed its position as the leader of Asia from Japan. China is obviously much more of a threat to the West given its size, not possessed by Japan, as well as its having had its formative years modernization wise entirely in defiance of the West under an economic embargo, after the US was forced to officially treat it as an equal in the Korean Armistice Agreement. China is much indebted to the Soviet Union, which suffered a very sad, tragic demise and further economic disintegration by taking ridiculous advice of Western leaders eager to ruin it, for the generous aid it provided to China in the 1950s, the decade when the critical foundation of modern China was built. Though there was a Sino-Soviet split, with the two in direct conflict a decade later, the immense contribution of the Soviet Union to China’s current success was a decisive factor and cannot be overstated. I believe that the ties between China and Russia are so strong and friendly today largely due to this, which the Chinese people remember well.

Though primarily an (autistic) math nerd, I do take a casual interest in power politics, as you can tell, and I have developed somewhat of a cynical attitude towards it. It is perhaps deep embedded in our human DNA for powerful groups and tribes to want to rule the world. You can see this with the (rather rogue, and also getting outdated) attitude that the American neocons and British empire nostalgists (for lack of a better word) towards international affairs. They are stupid and let their own exceptionalism delude themselves such that they demand the entirely unreasonable and refuse to give credit, in an utterly egregious way, to those they don’t like. For example, they won’t acknowledge, far from it, that it was mostly the USSR who defeated Hitler, which is obvious. They, being as powerful as they were, could sort of get away it, but now that time is past, with the rise and catching up of the rest of the world, China in particular. We all know that powerful individuals or nations generally don’t get along well and exhibit mutual distrust. It’s not uncommon for the most powerful to use a less threatening competitor against its primary competitor, and such is natural behavior. However, the US and the British do it too nastily without shame, and spread the most ridiculous propaganda that is patently false, not respecting history at all. There is also the entitlement to trample and enslave the weak without any reservation whatsoever that is patently manifested in that elite ruling class today. Take a look at the following picture, of Kate Middleton (with Prince William) in Tuvalu, which I will let speak for itself.

Kate-Middleton-carried-elevated-chair-upon-arrived

We all know that it is a human tendency for the rich and powerful to oppress and exploit the poor and marginalized, as has happened throughout history, just about everywhere. Aspiration for status is in our genes, and any social group operates on a hierarchy in some form or another. There will always be winners and losers, superiors and inferiors. But, this could be done in a more benign way than what is reflected in the above photo, which shows devoid of virtue the Anglo elites in the global “leadership” position they cling onto today, in desperation.