How East Asian males in America can attain more status and power

I read through some comments of wokeAZN on Reddit and I actually created a page where I began to collect his quotes. Of course, what he says many already know, but few will actually say, for obvious reasons. I think that yes, East Asian males really need to confront the reality and change certain flawed attitudes, and this is most easily done if the realities however unpleasant are laid bare before us.

Let me briefly list some of main points, far from inclusive.

  • the American system set up for the interest of privileged whites
  • Asian women making Asian men look like losers by marrying white men who give them a white voice on Asians via their media power
  • the bamboo ceiling set up by whites to guard against highly intelligent, hardworking, and high achieving Asians
  • big, dominant, assertive Asian men auto-triggering fragile white men on a regular basis
  • physical inferiority of Asian males
  • highly competent Asians ending up mostly working for white owners
  • Asian parents training their kids to be passive hard workers for the white man who don’t complain or fight for themselves
  • Asians not working out enough
  • The Anglo world’s having pretty much conquered the East

All this is really quite obvious to me, but maybe it isn’t to a lot of people. There is also that Asian-Americans cannot win under the current system, and how much because of that the powerful Chinese in America are mostly from China.

So naturally, if Asians in America want to go beyond where they are right now, they should try to develop more connections with powerful people from their home countries. That means they should seek out Chinese VCs with connections to important people in Chinese companies.

Here, I’ll use Asian to mean East Asian. Indians will be excluded, because they are kind of white the dark skin notwithstanding by virtue of both their appearance, their culture, and their mannerisms, as well as the bamboo ceiling not really applying to them as much. Also noteworthy is that India has already been fully conquered by the Anglo world. In some sense, they’ve already lost, whereas East Asians still have hope of creating an independent entity competitive with what the West, whites have.

I’ll start with some essential historical context. First that the Japanese shattered much of the perception of inherent white, Western supremacy. It started with the Russo-Japanese War. (By the way, Russians were conquered by the Mongols in the 13rd century, so they’re not fully white. Still, Russians are pretty white, even if the Anglo-Saxons hardly identify with them.) Then, there was how during WWII, the Japanese defeated without much difficulty the British in Hong Kong and Singapore and demonstrated their ability against America too. Even though Japan eventually lost, it was much due to their small size along with their overextension. Clearly, they were extremely formidable in a combination of their technology and fighting prowess.

Back then, it was only the Japanese who could be considered honorary whites in this sense. The Chinese were extremely backwards and weak and suffered much from Japan for this reason, and the Koreans were colonized by Japan for over 30 years. There was obviously a penalty against Japan by the white, Western powers who were too proud to treat Japan as an equal. After Japan defeated China militarily in 1895, the Western powers only felt more entitled to extract more out of China, the indignity of which culminated in the Boxer Rebellion.

To everybody’s great surprise, China stood up not long after the Japanese invaders surrendered and left. Remember how on the declaration of founding of the People’s Republic of China on October 1st 1949, Mao Zedong in front of Tiananmen Square said, “the Chinese people have stood up.” People in China who view history honestly will sort of laugh at it. Chinese back then were incompetent weaklings, so one Chinese army evicting another doesn’t really prove much. It was during the Korean War when China really stood up. It managed to do what the Japanese couldn’t, which was to defeat white, Western countries in a war. Of course, the Chinese fought using relatively primitive means, with minimal use of air force, but even so, they kicked the US led UN Army out of North Korea and maintained that position for almost 3 years, eventually pressuring the US to sign an armistice acknowledging its inability to defeat the Chinese army. I heard somewhere that after that, the Japanese would no longer refer to Chinese using the derogatory 支那.

Because of that, China could not trade with the United States and found it very difficult to trade with other Western countries. Until, China developed nuclear missiles among other things, finally forcing America to give up again.

Among ethnic Chinese who dislike the PRC, some of whom will say 反共不反华 (anti-communist but not anti-Chinese), from the historical context, they are best perceived as Chinese who are anti-Chinese in a half-closeted way. They will point to all the failures under Mao and the poverty in mainland China relative to the other East Asian countries under American patronage, but the reality is evidently that it was the Chinese communists who won the highest international position and power among Asians. Moreover, they did so in a very sustainable way, unlike Japan, which took it too far and eventually lost, losing all hope of becoming a world military power under the post WWII arrangement. Of course, Japan did scare America a bit with its cars and electronics. Their science and Nobel Prizes too, except that can’t change its status as an American, white vassal state. I guess once China becomes powerful enough, Japan may dump America and shift towards China, but that’s still a fair ways away.

So Asians indignant about the status of the group in America and internationally can best advance it by supporting China. Swallow the pride and sense of superiority inculcated under colonialism, it’s pathetic. The fact that America can get Chinese in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and in the West to feel superior to and even utterly contemptuous their counterparts in mainland China is a sign of their surrender and lack of self-confidence. If you support America, you’ll be mostly viewed by white American elites as a useful tool to keep down their most threatening competitor. On the other hand, if you support China enough, China will eventually treat you as one of their own.

There are already very few Chinese in America rising to a position of power by virtue of the bamboo ceiling. Even if you do, you are there as a minority, and so you have much less power than a white guy in the same official position. You defeat a system by boycotting it not by hard struggle within its rigged game.

The American media and culture loves to degrade the self-confidence and self-respect of Asian men. Well, you can do what you can to ignore it. Instead, immerse yourself in some Chinese communist culture and promote it to your other Asian friends as well. For sure, that’s much better for a masculine Asian identity than what America has to offer. Learn the Chinese language well enough and develop some connections in and from China for a chance of making some career there. For as long as you’re stuck in America, do what you need to do to make a living that doesn’t harm the group interest much and outside that, maybe try to connect with some other like minded Asians to start an independent enterprise. You can also try to influence the American media, culture, and politics to your favor, and maybe try to gain more stakes in power institutions such as Hollywood too. Don’t expect too much there though, as America is a country run by whites with a white majority. In any case, if Asians as a group want to win under the current system in America, they’ll almost certainly have to gang up with money and power from China. Remember that unless you immigrated after age 18, you ended up here not by choice. So you have every right to choose not to identify with America as part of a politically marginalized minority group too different to truly assimilate. You need not let the American media and education cage your mind, and you don’t have to give a damn about what the white majority thinks as long as you can get by. Instead, feel lucky to be of the same blood as a rising superpower who you and your posterity can truly be part of and do all you can to take advantage of and contribute to it in return.

Elizabeth Holmes, Kaifu Lee, and some remarks on fraud and manufactured success

Haha, father VP at Enron, fraud seems embedded in her bloodline. Fleischmann is Jewish, that means maybe Elizabeth Holmes can also go onto my Scandalous Jews list?

Recognition for “tireless optimism and a particularly warm smile.” What the fuck!? And lol, why would Chinese universities buy C++ compilers from her when they can easily obtain it free of charge.

You know this sounds like some real conspiracy theory out of Washington to manufacture a female Steve Jobs. Yet it failed miserably. Couldn’t the US elite do a better job of at least masking their corruption and nepotism a bit?

Speaking of which, a few days ago, I learned that Kaifu Lee, former Microsoft and Google VP, who was extremely popular among young people in China as a role model in the internet technology sector with widely read books on his life experience and on advice for youth, was actually exposed for fraud or at least gross misrepresentation and exaggeration of his career history and achievements, with many on the Chinese internet even suspecting him to be a half-closeted foreign influence agent. The guy who first ratted him out to the public on Weibo, where Kaifu has millions of followers, was Fang Zhouzi, a University of Science and Technology of China graduate and PhD in biochemistry (from Michigan State), who after doing a postdoc became a science writer and crusader against academic fraud. Fang pointed out how in his autobiography, Kaifu had written of himself as 卡尼基梅隆计算机系最年轻的副教授 (the youngest associate professor in the computer science department at Carnegie Mellon University). Fang emphasized the big difference between assistant and associate professor (one is tenured the other is merely tenure track), as well as the misleadingness of “youngest,” as Fang found a guy who had become an assistant professor in the same department as Kaifu earlier. In fact, there is not even solid evidence that Kaifu was even an assistant professor there; it’s possible that he was for less than a year before leaving for Apple. This was back in 2011 I believe, and it was all through Weibo, on which Kaifu finally had to give an apology, when excuses such as “nuances in translation” no longer worked.

As for the “foreign influence agent” part, we shall note how Kaifu was born in Taiwan, and his father was a historian there who wrote books to smear the Chinese communists. With some searches on Baidu one can also easily find that his uncle was executed by the communists soon after the PRC established, for allegedly having taken an active role in some campaign to kill Chinese communists earlier on. There are, too, accusations of his promotion of Taiwanese independence activists and the likes on his Weibo. Some people are even doubtful whether he actually got cancer; they suspect he might have gone to Taiwan where he could, with his political connections, fake it, all the while planning and organization with supporters there his next major influence operation. Note that while he did renounce his American citizenship (for tax reasons), he retained his ROC one (instead of switching to PRC citizenship). One can see much more such information on Kaifu here.

I was somewhat surprised as I had been under the impression that he has a very positive reputation in China. Certainly, I thought more lowly of him after realizing that much of what he had written in his book 《与未来同行》(A Walk into the Future), which I had read in high school, was basically superficial bullshit, which I’ve also mentioned here.

Yes, I much dislike it when people who are not actually all that smart and talented pretend to be and market themselves as such, even using PR professionals if they’re rich and connected enough. The truth is that there are some things one cannot fake, at least to a subset of people sufficiently knowledgeable. It’s obvious to me and many by now that some fields are much harder than others and thus the people in them tend to be much smarter and more talented on average. Similarly, stuff like SATs and math contests cannot be faked, and the existence of an actual cognitive hierarchy grounded on reality is apparent from the consistency of results in such contests. A 100 meter sprint time cannot be faked either. People who run sub 10 s times or close are real genetic freaks of nature, marvels of human biology. On the other hand, promotions and career success in the likes you get uplifted much under the whims of those already in power often reflect political favor and connection as opposed to actual ability and accomplishment. Even in the internet technology sector, you have politically enabled people taking credit for the work of others and even creating a cult of themselves within the company or the sector at large. Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, etc. We cannot really be that sure of them as individuals. We can be sure that their companies had some actually very talented and capable people who contributed collectively to their successful products. Yes, in statistics, it is sample size that can easily exponentially increase the level of statistical significance. On this, I shall note that if an individual fails out in the career/promotions world where there is a relatively high random component, it could have well been due to bad luck, though certainly, the longer the career, the more samples we have and thus the more confidence. In contrast, if a large group, like a nation or ethnic group, fails to produce top people or companies, we can be relatively sure that that group really is less competent at either the individual or collective level.

An ideal world is one where people recognize and respect those more talented than they are and get out of their way. If somebody else can visibly do a job much better than you can, you should just let that person do the job. Do something you’re better suited to. If you’re mediocre, then take a mediocre position and keep a low profile. Don’t pretend to be a genius when you’re obviously not. People in the likes of Elizabeth Holmes do enormous damage directly to actual quality and quantity of productivity by making shit out of vast resources they manage to accumulate out of family and political connections, that would have been made much better use of controlled by more appropriately competent people. An even more insidious effect is the trust it erodes in our society, which can be very difficult to recover. Elizabeth Holmes, her family, and her financial supporters must bear collective responsibility for the damage they’ve wrought to America, as this country’s elite. Evade it as they probably will and the long term consequence will only be more dire. Talented, capable people from other countries will want to come here less, and talented, capable people already in America will feel less incentivized and inspired to actually contribute. Eventually, they can bring this entire country down.

As for Kaifu, he was obviously a pretty legit research engineer, nothing like Holmes. His later public intellectual behavior is questionable though, especially his gross inflation of himself in his autobiography, which he had the ego and lack of judgment to publish before retired. Yes, Kaifu appears on the surface to have good intentions. In his book, he wrote about his dream of creating impact in China, about how he dreamed of returning to his motherland, which his father was not able to do. He considered himself very successful and a rightful inspiring figure, teacher, and role model for young people in China interested in technology. But he took that way too far, and even lied about his past experience to sell himself, which is quite shameful really. Also, there are a good number of mainland Chinese in his generation far more accomplished than Kaifu at science and technology at least; wouldn’t they, based on their achievement alone, make much better role models than Kaifu, let alone the shared background. As much as I dislike to judge people based on their national and political background, I’m realistic to acknowledge that it does matter to some degree as far as role models for a nation’s young people are concerned. Why Kaifu when there are mainland Chinese in computer science, let alone science and technology in general, visibly more talented and accomplished? I can think of off the top of my head Robin Li, the founder of Baidu, who as far as technical computer science is concerned, did win a Rankdex patent that the Google guys cited in their PageRank paper, though he does not have a PhD, let alone from a top CS school like Carnegie Mellon. Robin Li was from a pretty average family in a so so place in China, tested into Beijing University, was very successful though not wildly so in the US, and later returned to China where he founded China’s top search engine that has also created its own deep learning library and framework called PaddlePaddle. He is visibly a much better role model for young Chinese interested in computer science and internet technology than Kaifu both in terms of his achievement and his national/social/political background, but he does not have the vanity of the likes of Kaifu, becoming a social media celebrity and publishing all this superficial, even misleading advice for young people.

As for the KMT background of Kaifu’s family, I hate to say it, but human reality is such that one’s political associations and actions affect indirectly to some degree or another the outcomes of one’s offspring, and thus, one also takes some responsibility for the actions/crimes of one’s ancestors. Yes, in one’s behavior, one should not only think of how it affects oneself in the short term, but also how it would in the long term affect those inextricably bound to oneself. History has already proven his family to have sided with the losers, with those who failed to save China, as “patriotic” as he may appear in his words. Maybe they had good intentions, but nobody in the right mind would believe that a political party and army who lost a civil war the way they did would have done a much better job developing and modernizing the country had they taken over. Again, it can easily be hard to speak for particular individuals, but that the KMT got massive aid from the US and managed to lose control of all of mainland China meant that they MUST have been a seriously rotten and incompetent organization.

So if he wants to be taken seriously by the majority of Chinese in mainland China as truly patriotic, he would have to do somewhat more in terms of tangible contribution directly towards China than a mainland Chinese would and perhaps also make some political move to at least implicitly denounce the political background he inherited from his family not by choice. Yes, he was part of the founding of Microsoft Research Asia in Beijing, which did help cultivate many computer science talents in China and likely also transferred some substantial technology to Chinese companies. Quite applaudable. Still, Microsoft is not a Chinese company, and Google much less so, as advanced as they may be in their technology. Kaifu has not as far as I can tell made any meaningful and recognized contribution to an important Chinese company or organization. So people are naturally skeptical, especially given his public intellectual activities and Weibo celebrity status, which some suspect to be supported behind the scenes, perhaps even directly from Washington itself, in the likes of Holmes’s case.

It does seem that Kaifu Lee is no longer that big in China now compared to a decade ago. Surely, Fang Zhouzi discredited him quite a bit, and the courage it took in Fang to question a figure as high up and “authoritative” as Kaifu Lee is very admirable. And he did so in a very detailed, factual, and objective way, in contrast to the vague, generic advice Kaifu has given to young people.

As for Kaifu Lee’s Google background, I do recall how an ex-Googler from China, who characterized himself as a Han chauvinist 😉 had said that certainly his having worked for Google would not be considered a plus in the case that he later tries to make a serious career in some very government organization in China. I was somewhat surprised, but in retrospect, I can see how that is the case. So suspicion of Kaifu Lee in China is but natural.

It was certainly amusing how he regarded limitations to his career prospects within the Chinese government and its organizations as a much bigger deal to him than Google. Well, after all, the Chinese government runs a near superpower that is the largest economy (by PPP) and most populous nation on earth, whereas Google merely runs the most advanced internet search and distributed systems (and likely also AI) company in the world. Google needs the Chinese market much more than China needs Google. Without Google, China still has plenty of similar products which may not be technically as good but are definitely good enough. They left back in 2010 purportedly out of objections to censorship compliance, and now they’re trying to return with another censored search product, that 1000+ of its rather politically delusional employees are jointly protesting against. Of course, there is also that that guy is well aware how as a mainland Chinese, there’s basically no way he’ll ever rise up to even a modest position of power within Google, unless he sells his soul, as even the ones who joined quite early on were unable to do so, so there’s not much to lose anyway.

What’s wrong with the Ivy League

Very recently, a Chinese-American Yale undergrad cold emailed me expressing approval of this blog, and we not long after began to talk regularly.

A few days ago, in an email to Steve Hsu, me, and some others, he wrote:

I think the Ivy League is best understood as a giant money-making organism. Attached to it like a leech is a seminary for training priests and spreading the gospel of the American progressive religion. Attached to that leech is an even smaller leech which actually contains smart people doing good technical work. And gmachine1729 is right that the average Ivy student is not that great (but the top end does represent the best of the best).

Relatedly, I just saw an essay on Zhihu in Chinese by Yale finance professor Zhiwu Chen on the matter of 中国人那么优秀,为什么美国人还是更喜欢印度人?(Chinese are so exceptional, why do Americans still like Indians more). The essay was one of Chinese are smart and hardworking but modest, passive, conformist, filially pious per the Confucian tradition and emphasize hard skills at the expense of soft skills, while Indians, like Americans, are assertive and confident with strong leadership qualities. The comments, of which there were 27, were mostly dismissive. The first one, and the most memorable one was

你对比下毛主席和甘地还不能明白点?

In translation,

Can’t you better understand the situation by comparing Chairman Mao with Gandhi?

I’m very happy to see this. It means that Chinese are no longer dazed by Ivy League credentials. They are beginning to think more independently, to have more confidence in themselves. Maybe in another decade’s time, non-STEM professor at Ivy will become an explicit negative signal among Chinese in China.

Jack Ma

He’s one of those trendy major success stories. He’s basically gone viral in China. Especially after Alibaba IPO. His net worth is like $44 billion. I didn’t really care enough to learn more about him. What I did remember was that he was an academically dull student. From his Wiki page:

Later in his youth, Ma struggled attending college. The Chinese entrance exams are held only once a year and Ma took four years to pass. Ma attended Hangzhou Teacher’s Institute (currently known as Hangzhou Normal University) and graduated in 1988 with a B.A. in English.[8][9]

Okay back then, only a small percentage actually attended college (like 5%, maybe 10%). In the end, he could only get into a bullshit major in a shit tier school.

It seems like he was basically a complete loser until his mid thirties.

Jack Ma applied for 30 different jobs and got rejected by all. “I went for a job with the police; they said, ‘you’re no good,'” Ma told interviewer Charlie Rose. “I even went to KFC when it came to my city. Twenty-four people went for the job. Twenty-three were accepted. I was the only guy…”.[12] In addition to this, he applied 10 times to Harvard Business School (HBS) and got rejected.[13]

It’s funny he even applied for the police because I just learned he’s only 5′ 0″ (152 cm). Those people hiring in the police department were probably like, “who is this midget twit.” He doesn’t know shit about programming or computing and basically hired people who did to actually create Alibaba. I’m ever more convinced that he mostly was extremely lucky. There are zillions of average IQ people with entrepreneurial spirit in China, and I’ve had encounters with some of them myself. Most will only attain modest success. Sadly, people, even in China, are statistically delusional, and actually believe his success was mostly due to skill or “unusual business sense.”

I was just talking about this in a group chat. I wrote the following:

Honestly I’d respect a serious engineer/scientist in, say, the space program in China more than Jack Ma just about any day.

Mostly because there is actually real skill/depth/substance in that. The people who developed China’s nuclear weapons/missiles and satellites unambiguously created much more value for China than Alibaba did. They, the top scientists and engineers behind that, of course merely earned high salaries from the government. In contrast, the leverage China obtained internationally from that, in addition to the technical foundation essential for later economic development is easily on the order of trillions of dollars. Not that what Jack Ma did didn’t have a lot of value. It did, but it’s way overhyped, and more importantly, more people could have in theory lucked into that than there are people with the IQ to, say, master calculus, which by the standards of any serious STEM R&D would be but extremely rudimentary, more or less taken for granted.

This phenomenon is everywhere. In America, when Steve Jobs dies, it’s like the end of the world. When Dennis Ritchie dies, few people actually care. China, much thanks to a combination of Confucian culture and its hard-core communist past, is much better in this regard. But it has degenerated too, sadly. It’s quite problematic that now in China, young people aspire more to be Jack Ma than to be Qian Xuesen (钱学森). Mostly because of money. More convinced I am now that most of what is still culturally healthy left in China today can be traced back to the Maoist era. Yes, there was persecution of intellectuals, much of it an unintended side effect, especially during the Cultural Revolution. But overall, the serious scientists/engineers were highly respected, and even the top political leaders like Mao and Zhou paid close attention to them and their needs; the political attacks against them mostly came from below as a side effect of political movements. They were paid high salaries and given higher benefits, which is what should be done given their talent and importance to the country. Remember that back then, everybody was dirt poor and there were no jock entrepreneurs lucking out on millions.

Now we have an epidemic of highly talented, cultured, hardworking, perceptive, and well-meaning people in STEM being treated like shit, let alone the average Joe, so that more resources and wealth can be concentrated in the hands of idiot businessmen and corrupt politicians. This changes the culture too to value money above substance. There needs to be a strong counterforce to that, and only a powerful government and state controlled media run by actual smart, cultured people dedicated to preservation of national interest and communist orthodoxy can achieve this.

wokeAZN

I stumbled upon the reddit by the handle wokeAZN. Guessing from his handle, he advises Asian-Americans on how to fight for equal rights. One of his main points, which I’ve long realized and written about on this blog, is that in the current system, privileged whites have no incentive to not preserve their privilege, which necessarily means depriving Asian-Americans. A representative comment on that would be

Correct. Asian-American activism as of today is entirely focused on begging the predominantly white owners to change their ways without even considering to challenge or disrupt the ruling mechanisms to begin with. Their weapons of choice are politeness, copying SJW concepts that worked for other marginalized groups and political correctness. Good luck with that.

Look at the recent Harvard and specialized NYC HS admissions controversy for example. Asians loudly speak up in droves protesting the process changes yet none of them even thought about the need to challenge and dismantle the administrations and institutions that are in charge of the admissions processes. Same goes for any activism directed towards Hollywood and the Western media etc.

This was in response to the quote:

“Nobody in the world, nobody in history, has ever gotten their freedom by appealing to the moral sense of the people who were oppressing them.”- Assata Shakur.

This is nothing but obvious to me. Reminds me of how in essence, Gandhi’s nonviolent resistance signals nothing but weakness. India’s nominal independence didn’t really liberate India. She remained at her core still a British colony. I recall how Chinese Marxist philosopher Ai Siqi (艾思奇) wrote of Gandhi’s nonviolent resistance with disdain, a fact I had commented on before in Chinese. The Chinese communists on the other hand actually won a war against America in Korea, the reason they are so despised in the West. So yes, if Chinese-Americans want equal rights in America, they should go unambiguously more in the direction of the Chinese communists. It’s not about morality; it’s about leverage. I heartily hope that Asian-Americans can stop exhibiting a form of Stockholm syndrome manifested in the form of defensiveness and attachment towards a system that treats them as second-class citizens.

I’ve written the following:

You can probably tell that I want Chinese to obtain more position of power internationally. It would make a better world. By default Chinese have less sense of entitlement which also hinders their rise to the top. I used to blindly revere the top STEM people. Now I realize that not only should you be strong technically but you should also have the political awareness of what your technical strength is going into. Who is reaping the fruits of your labor. A guy I know told me he got promoted, with the help of someone higher up, after he sort of went on strike and only then did management realize how much he was needed. See this is leverage. There are a lot of eager earnest people churning out a ton of value for the company without demanding more and executives love that. Their existence lowers the leverage of the value creators. I’m thinking of what could possibly give Chinese-Americans more leverage. Little, as they’re for the most part unwelcome in positions of power in the US. Again many Chinese have false hopes of meritocracy. Yes, it’s meritocratic up to a certain point, but in terms of actual political power it’s far from it. The Chinese who do get promoted in the media and politically by the mainstream American establishment tend to be those who are against collective Chinese interests. Why do you think the successful Chinese entrepreneurs in America have a hardware focus. Because those require real expertise with high barrier to entry.

The struggle for socioeconomic position of Chinese-Americans I expect to be largely futile. It’s already very saturated at this point. Way more technically smart and well-trained Chinese than the system can tolerate. There are some rich Chinese who hit it big with entrepreneurship but they generally have far less political power than a white guy with the same net worth due to relative lack of elite networks. Those rich Chinese from China in the states have little actual power; all they can really do is make a dent on the real estate market, and fund some pro-Chinese activities there, though with that, there will only be increasing scrutiny. If Chinese are to gain massively, it would have to be based from what comes out of China. Basically become like the Jews. Develop a reputation of fuck with us too much and there will be consequences. To do so, China would have to play the extortion game very aggressively too. What leverage does China have now? For one, large market. This is why airlines have to accept demands to list Taiwan as part of China; if they don’t they lose a ton of business. What else? Potentially encourage the Chinese with hard to acquire expertise in critical STEM fields to stop working for American companies, go to China instead. Take it to the very extreme, if China/Chinese want to be truly feared on the international stage, they can once they’re adequately prepared to guarantee victory encourage North Korea to invade again as Stalin did in 1950 with a serious pledge to back them up, use anti-ship/anti-aircraft missiles to prevent Americans in Seoul from escaping, then America will negotiate with China to save members of their own political elite. China could demand complete withdrawal of US forces from the Korean Peninsula as a condition. Now, anti-ship/anti-aircraft missiles would make it not that hard to enforce blockades near one’s borders; the era of American military dominance by air is over. China is already in the process of deploying the state of the art S-400 it got from Russia to cover most of Taiwan and has already deployed its own, less advanced but still formidable, air defense system on the South China Sea islands, enough to render US fighter jets practically useless in the region.

How do you get an edge over a competitor? You can by improving yourself, making your product more competitive, that’s the good way. Like it or not, you can often do equally or more by directly sabotaging the competitor in a way you can get away with. The success of Microsoft, and many big businesses, had arguably much more to do with the latter. In the case of geopolitical influence, militarily evicting the enemy is necessary. It doesn’t have to turn violent, and ideally, it shouldn’t; all one needs is enough military power for the other side to give in on the negotiating table.

As an example of China’s exercising leverage, did you know that in the 50s, after the Korean War, the US would not let Chinese with STEM PhDs return? After a few years of negotiation, the Chinese government exchanged American POWs for the freedom of those Chinese with hard-to-obtain and strategically important STEM expertise to return to their home country, where they would make a decisive contribution to the success that China is today. China/Chinese, if they really want to get ahead, need to do similarly. Their struggle in America is a losing game. Yes, there are ways to succeed massively yourself, but more often than not the tradeoff is generating much more value/money/success for others, which could even count as an anti-success given the relative nature of success.

For Chinese, it’s okay if you piss off some elite Americans. You can always go back to China and find something reasonable there. China is not what it was twenty years ago. Plus, if you’re anti the American establishment, the Chinese government will likely support you. With Indians, it might be different, since India still is shit place. And Indians have for the most part already given up. Indians cannot even create their own Internet companies.

Speaking of which, I am trying out some Chinese internet products, and while there is still room for improvement, they seem to have created a reliable alternative. Weiyun (微云) for cloud storage, and integrated with WeChat. Foxmail.com for Email. Both products of Tencent. There is also that Opera Browser, which originated from Norway, was acquired by Chinese company Qihoo 360, and it is faster and uses less memory than Chrome. Comes with ad-block and VPN by default too. I’m definitely sticking to that.

I’ll conclude with another comment of wokeAZN:

Good. Let them be afraid. TBH I live and eat because I’m taking wealth that previously belonged to whites every day probably. Not that I dispossess whites or whoever else on purpose, I just work and buy land, stock and assets here legally. So? What do you want me to do? Apologize and return my land and assets? Lol lol

Asians, keep acquiring your land and wealth while you’re here. if you dispossess whites unintentionally don’t feel bad about it.

He’s 100% correct. If Asian-Americans want equal rights, they should try to take as much from this country while contributing as little as they can in return. That’s the logical response towards discrimination. Either use this country solely to advance yourself and your group to the extent that you can, or don’t come here in the first place. There are even some Asians who bash their own for not contributing enough to the community, which is ridiculous. Seriously, have some sense of entitlement. It’s not really your community anyway. Yes, those rich Chinese who buy real estate here basically contribute nothing. If fact, they make lives harder for the middle-class by driving up housing prices. Well too bad.

Harvard’s discrimination against Asian-Americans

It was revealed last week or so that Harvard systematically rates Asian-Americans lower on personality, on subjective traits such as “positive personality,” likability, courage, kindness and being “widely respected.” I’m not surprised at all by this. Though they could have at least been a bit smarter about this by keeping this shit off the record. Now the investigators could actually reveal something about their process to the public that would undermine the institution’s credibility.

Though I am an Asian-American, I will not try to pretend. It’s so far for Harvard’s institutional interests more or less rational to do what they’re doing. Asian-Americans have very little power and influence over the institution. Sure, there is no shortage of prominent Asian-Americans professors at Harvard, mostly in STEM, but they don’t actually have all that much influence over the institution, and are mostly being used by the institution to advance its own academic reputation. The same goes for being an Asian academic undergrad admit (who can, say, win a high place for Harvard at the Putnam Contest). There is also the implicit assumption that because Asians face race-related disadvantages in the career game, especially in the corporate world, due to unconscious bias, lack of ethnic affinity networks, etc, they should be penalized, as future career success, of a form not perceived as too threatening to the current elite, is crudely what admissions is optimizing for. So, life is not fair, get used to it, and do the little that you can to try to make things more fair (or more in your favor).

I’ve actually seen some not actually very talented Asian-Americans without hooks who did make it to HYP under very striverish behavior. They played the game of try hard resume optimization, of appearing less Asian. The thing is that most of those people end up not well at all after graduation. Don’t think that HYP guarantees a good job. There is no guarantee is today’s world. Those people did too little in terms of developing actually employable skills. What they got by playing the college admissions game was essentially a pyrrhic victory. Actually competent state school kids do much better than them in the workplace. So, don’t be stupid like that.

Even many actually smart Asian-American HYP grads don’t do all that great. A common outcome is a merely solid engineer at a respected technology company. Some go to a top grad school, but success much depends on the field. Academia has very few openings nowadays, though for engineering, due to industrial demand, it is much less competitive than math or science. A common route of course for the really technically exceptional is quant finance, though those positions tend to be taken by immigrants, who generally undergo a much more rigorous STEM education with less distraction compared to what Asian-Americans receive. The thing is that so many people are irrationally desperate to attend an elite school. Some middle class parents will burn a fortune to send their kid to some fancy prep school full of rich kids, where they easily end up at the bottom half of the school’s social hierarchy, let alone for an elite university. They lose sight of the fact that in many if not most cases, major determines what you do much more than school. There are many cases of these try hards wasting much time, money, and stress for nothing.

Like it or not, America is still very much a white country. Asian-Americans can and should try, but they shouldn’t realistically expect equality. If Chinese parents really want their son to become a lawyer or politician, they should probably stay in China. It’ll be hard there as well, but your odds of success will be probably at least an order of magnitude higher than in America. Here, I use only the male qualification of child in light of how “on average, Asian American women received higher personal ratings and extracurricular ratings than Asian American men.”[3] This is, of course, consistent with what goes on in the real world as well. And it is expected, considering how historically, sexism and racism have always gone together.

A while ago, I wrote on here a rather cynical (or whatever you call it) piece in Chinese regarding elite US schools, which to my pleasant surprise a Chinese international of my acquaintance who attended Harvard commented on affirmatively. Its title has somewhat of a sensationalist provocative vibe to it, translated to English as “American elite universities as a political tool for brainwashing and uplifting (pseudo) elite of Chinese descent.” Of course, I have more or less the highest regard for the STEM being done at these top American institutions, though maybe it is a bit overrated. Much of the humanities and social science coming from those places I find quite questionable though, and that goes along with the cultural and political values fostered by these institutions. On that, I brought up how the former unsuccessful regime of China, the Republic of China, was led and run largely by Chinese graduates of Ivies of their time, who were but superficially Westernized and modernized Chinese. Despite their graduating from these elite schools, they lost the civil war and failed to modernize China, though perhaps that also had much to do with their being in the wrong time. Certainly though, many of the elite Chinese who played prominent roles in China’s modernization from the 50s on did advanced study in STEM in these top American schools. I’ll say that from my experience, it certainly does seem that these schools tend to select for Asians whose social and political viewpoints, often not very grounded on reality, tend to fit them into the aforementioned category, like Jeff Yang, with whom Steve Hsu had a debate. This is of course part of the pattern of American elites’ desire to bring elites of other countries into their circle, in a sufficiently subordinate position. On this, I’ll say how I’ve read comments on how over past half century or so, affirmative action by Harvard and other Ivies has won for American elites not only (a facade of) charity but also cultural and ethnic representatives to advance their interests in, say, African countries. For that, Harvard was useful as a binding force. Surely, Harvard has always played a quintessential role in persisting the rule and influence of the current American elite throughout the world, and like it or not, kissing the ruler’s ass is almost always the easiest way to rise up on the social ladder. In Chinese, to be America’s dog is spoken of as pejorative, but so what, there were and are too many small countries willing to do so, because it brings them, their elites in particular, much economic and political benefit.

Asians tend to be pretty obsessed with prestige. Chinese are very, and Koreans are especially so. In the 80s and 90s and 00s, a degree from a prestigious or good American school was much an upper mobility ticket in China. Now, this is much less so, because there are too many such Chinese now, and also maybe because people in China have increasingly realized that maybe these people aren’t actually all that good, in spite of their brand-name American school. A PhD from MIT from China once told me that now in China, companies are increasingly reluctant to hire “sea turtles;” you have to pay them more, when more often than not, you can find a local guy who can do the job as well or better for much less. This is a sign of devaluation of elite American institutions, and I believe this will continue, given the relatively low level of STEM education and preparation in America (which is impossible to hide to any actually smart, scientifically literate person) along with America’s overall decline.

The short-sighted and personally motivated decisions of the intellectually mediocre and politically delusional American elite over the past generation are, cumulatively, really taking its toll now, on the American economy and the credibility of its ruling class. Their elite institutions, nepotistic and corrupt in its admissions, are losing the public’s trust and alienating Asian-Americans especially, many of whom moved to a foreign country speaking little English with too much blind faith in the so-called American Dream that they sought for themselves and more so for their children. American elites may have thought that they themselves could neglect STEM, that there are plenty of talented foreigners, many of whom Asian, willing to do those jobs indefinitely, often grossly under-compensated and with their American-born, American-raised kids facing higher hurdles in education and at work. This might have been so decades ago, when in their home countries, there was still lack of economic opportunity for smart people. Nowadays, there is a booming and internationally competitive high technology sector in China, with India going that direction as well, in spite of brain drain into America. Collectively, the STEM expertise has over time not only grown itself but transformed into significant leverage for the group, so much that the elites running Harvard need to resort to rogue tactics to preserve themselves. I don’t exactly blame them. It’s just like how people who go the bullshit business and social climbing route do so largely to compensate for their inherent intellectual deficit; at least to me, that’s never a pleasant or honorable position to be in. But what else can you do, if not to accept defeat? I can already foresee such an entrenched group fighting desperately for its own survival. Harvard will do all that it can to get away with what it’s doing right now amidst much backlash. And it’s an extraordinary rich, powerful, well-connected institution, much able to manipulate the outcomes. Either they win, or they reform themselves accordingly, or they become slowly sidelined. We’ll see. I just hope they don’t resort to even nastier tactics. Though that tends to happen when power and survival is at serious risk.

References

[1] http://infoproc.blogspot.com/2018/06/harvard-office-of-institutional.html

[2] http://infoproc.blogspot.com/2018/06/harvard-office-of-institutional_21.html

[3] http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-lee-harvard-legacy-student-advantage-20180622-story.html

[4] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gekcNqlHptM

More evidence for my hypothesis on South Asians vis-a-vis East Asians

Link to comment on Steve Hsu’s blog. The “my hypothesis” in the title is with reference to one of my previous blog posts. Content copy-pasted below.

https://www.imo-official.or…

In pure-visual ability, above data clearly indicated East Asian ability. Naturally they excel in STEM field.

But in silicon valley, South Asian engineers move up easily in corporate world. Advancing in corporate world is depending more on social skill than engineering skill. South Asian also display strong social skill as result of people from high density origin.

Some Chinese American engineers told me about their experience in silicon valley. They did most work while Indian colleagues seems not able to do much. But once the project is done, these Indian colleagues are fantastic at putting everybody’s work together and present to the superiors. These Indian American are natural conference presenters. Good social skill gets all credits for career advance.

Indeed, making other thinking you smart is more important than wether you are really smart in subjective world (social dependency world). This is so true for most part of world.

When objective measurement is criteria, you get totally different picture because God is judge here. Human opinion is meaningless.

 

The Brahmins

The cognitive and personality profile, and overall achievement package, of Indians as a group is a rather interestingly unbalanced one. Sometimes they do spectacular things, like discovering the infinite series for trigonometric functions of sine, cosine, tangent, and arctangent as early as the 14th century, producing a good number of real geniuses like Ramanujan and Satyendra Nath Bose, and reaching Mars orbit on its first attempt, being the first Asian nation to do so, and doing so at a small fraction of the cost expended by NASA. An IMO gold medalist I talk to once said to me that there are probably more Indians than Chinese with IQ 160+ due to very high Brahmin IQ that has stabilized (meaning regression to a stable high Brahmin mean as opposed to the low Indian mean) over millennia of inbreeding within caste. I thought maybe. Certainly, I do sometimes get the impression that Indians, at least in science, are better than Chinese at breeding the type of genius with the right combination of technical ability and scientific discernment that manages to discover radically deep and groundbreaking science in a very independent and spectacular fashion. The Chinese have produced geniuses of the highest order (or close) in science the 20th century, like Chen Ning Yang in theoretical physics and Shing-Shen Chern in pure math, with Yang-Mills and Chern classes ubiquitous now in the literature of their respective fields, which are now very intertwined. However, they did so only after much training, exposure, and reinforcement based on the whole framework of modern science developed in the West over many centuries, and ancient China, on the other hand, did not produce in pure science anything near what Indians did, a sign of lack of genius and of poor taste, both in its rare individuals and at the collective societal level. On this, I like to think that Indians are Greeks and Chinese are Romans.

In sharp contrast to China, India in practical matters has been largely a complete fuckup, or at least vastly outmatched by China. It is well known that the ancient Chinese invented gunpowder and paper-making, whereas nothing of equal direct impact came out of ancient India. In modern times, China developed nuclear weapons way faster than India did, and even before that, defeated India in a war in 1962, which, even worse for India, was entirely her fault. Economically and infrastructurally, holistically speaking, India, exemplified by its frequent power outages and accident-prone train system, could be regarded as a few decades behind China, which is further confirmed by that India’s life expectancy and infant mortality rate is, today, where China had been at 20+ years ago. Given that the two had been around the same level in 1950, India’s development has unambiguously been a complete failure.

How to explain this? On this, I recall how my Chinese friend’s mom had said that it’s not because China’s elite is smarter than India’s elite, but because China’s grassroots is smarter than India’s grassroots. This is well-confirmed by international IQ studies which tend to put China’s average IQ at around 105 and India’s around 82, which is a 1.5 sigma difference. So even if India’s +3 sigma is as smart or smarter than China’s +3 sigma, there are too many dumb, dysfunctional people holding India back, from their needing to be fed while doing the routine work rather poorly. So, the smart, (usually) high caste Indians opt to go to America to escape India’s dysfunction, so ubiquitous that even the ultra-rich at home cannot immune itself. The best and brightest in that category tend to go through the IITs at home for undergrad, the most reliable ticket to a high paying tech job in the United States. That stratum of Indians has established by now quite a presence in top American tech companies and universities (just about every top STEM academic department in the US has several prominent Indian profs). For example, Microsoft and Google both have Indian CEOs, and plenty of Indian engineers and managers, with many of them in high ranking positions, especially at Google. In contrast, there are few Chinese in top leadership positions. When I learned that Google has several Indian SVPs but no Chinese, a guy from China responded with humorous ease followed by sarcastic insult: “不用担心,阿里巴巴的SVP全都是中国人,百度的SVP也全都是中国人,没有一个印度人。(In translation: Don’t worry, Alibaba’s SVPs are all Chinese, Baidu’s SVPs are all Chinese, not a single Indian) What does India have? Tata? Infosys?” This is, based on my experience, similar to how people react to the astronomical success of certain Indian academics, entrepreneurs, and business leaders in America. They will say: “Sure, an individual brilliant Indian does extremely well in America. But what does India as a nation get from that?”

Even such brilliance of these elite Indians is somewhat questionable. On TopCoder, which plenty of Indians obsess over on Quora, now infested by low status Indians, India is ranked, as I am currently writing this, only 11th out of the 31 countries on there, with only two red (the highest category) coders, despite having more than twice the number of members as China, the second most populous nation in this algorithmic coding contest. They’ve actually done better in recent years. I remember back years ago when I participated, I, having been on the lower side of yellow (the second highest category) coder, would have ranked close to the top among the Indians. Of course, one must not discount the possibility that the best Indians have better things to do than practice for a contest where one solves artificial algorithmic problems, which is consistent with my having seen and worked with many Indians who are very competent at real software engineering, with quite a strong sense for systems design and real world production code, which are rather orthogonal to, and much more consequential than, what one sees in those contrived coding contests and interviews. Still, the dismally low performance of Indians on TopCoder still raises suspicions, because TopCoder, like the International Math Olympiad, which India is complete garbage at, is a 100% objective and fair contest, whereas success in the real world software engineering, determined by promotions and professional level, has a political and context component. It’s not just the Indians at home; even in America, where the smartest Indians tend to go, the Chinese kids beat the Indian kids by a wide margin on the elite math, computing, and physics olympiads, even when the Indian kids seem to have improved a fair bit over the recent years. From this, one can only conclude that Indians are naturally not that strong in the abilities which these contests load on, though of course they may be relatively much more talented in research and engineering, for which these contests are very imperfect predictors.

You, the reader, have probably noticed that up to now, we’ve focused mostly on brains and technical ability. Yes, they are essential, but personality characteristics (both individual and collective) and “soft skills” also matter, especially if one wants to rise to a leadership position. From my personal observation, Indians are, in general, very good at projecting confidence and assertiveness from the way the talk and present themselves, much better than Chinese are, at least in the American cultural context, even when you discount the language barrier Chinese face relative to Indians. I’m talking not only about how one says things in terms of word choice, but the vocal tone and body language behind it. Sure, you can disdain this as superficial, but it matters. Perception matters as much, and in some cases, more, than substance. There is also that Indians seem to have a stronger network and help each out more in the career world. Collective intelligence or ethnic nepotism, you be the judge.

I have stories to tell on this. First of all, I remember vividly how when I interned at the same place as an Indian schoolmate, he was the only one who scheduled, successfully in a few cases, coffee meetings with executives, as an intern (!!!!!), when it never would have occurred to me, or probably almost everyone else except him, to even try. One can sort of link this to collective intelligence, in that it is an indicator of discernment with regard to who matters (the executives) and who doesn’t (the engineer worker bees) within the political organization. And needless to say, you rise up in the organization by aligning yourself with the people who matter. Yes, my telling a full-time engineer this was met largely with a response in the likes of, “He knows who matters and who doesn’t. And even if he completely fucks up, he has nothing to lose, he’s only a 2nd year college intern. In any case, he gets good practice interacting with people who matter.” There is also that multiple people I know have complained about blatant Indian favoritism in interviews in the likes of what is described in this Quora answer. Yes, others have told me that when Indians interview other Indians, the bar is much lower. It’s not just in interviews. Another guy told me about how he once worked for a company that turned into ruins after Indian managers protected some Indian fuckups from getting fired. Personally, I have seen a case of Indians getting promoted way faster than those of other ethnic groups on a big team with an Indian director. So sometimes, I ask myself the verboten. Could it be that Indians really are far higher ranked in tech companies than their ability and contribution, because they are much more self-promoting and collectively nepotistic than those of other groups? Moreover, could it be that many people secretly think and resent this but are too afraid to say out of fear of being publicly vilified for “being racist” and having their careers ruined from alienating a national group increasingly powerful in corporate America? And that gradually, other groups, as they awake to the rigging of the game and get past, reluctantly, their moral objections, will quietly do the same, transforming tech companies and the American workplace at large into literal prison gangs contend, destroying whatever is left of the ideal of meritocracy and fair play in this country, ever more mired in identity politics?

Don’t get me wrong. There is much variance in personality and character and ability in those of any ethnic group, including for Indians, and much overlap between ethnic groups. Like, I know of this really brilliant Indian who donates most of his tech salary to very worthy causes, leaving little for himself, and he would be the last person I would expect, based on his characterized as autistic personality, to successfully climb the corporate ladder, though through sheer talent alone, he should do just fine in the appropriate position. Moreover, I have interacted with several Indians who had been very kind, tolerant, and helpful towards me. However, averages can differ by a standard deviation or more, with enormous social consequences.

I actually feel somewhat sympathetic for India and the Indians here. Somebody, on this, even said something along the lines of: “India is just such a shitty place that the Indians here have nothing to lose, so they play dirty political games and engage in the most spineless social climbing.” What can be done to resolve this? Immediately, I cannot think of anything other than drastically reducing the number of abjectly impoverished, low IQ Indians in India by simultaneously improving economic conditions and enforcing birth control on the poor and unable, so that less suffering and dysfunction is spread to the next generation. India could, instead of drinking the democracy Kool-Aid, learn from China, in a way compatible to its own culture and circumstances, just as China did from the West and the Soviet Union, to great success. Its elite needs to correct many of its deeply flawed social attitudes, and not only that, actually act accordingly with full force; otherwise, the excessive damage India does to itself, America, and the world at large with its internal dysfunction and exported corruption will always far outweigh what its elites contribute to science and technology. I can’t be optimistic on this though, barring some really radical change.

On credentialism and selection systems

I’ve mentioned before that an Asian-American friend of mine, who is quite smart, disapproves of the whole campaign against Asian quotas spearheaded, or at least advocated, by Steve Hsu and others.

His words are the following:

  1. I don’t believe in legitimizing the credentialist culture of modern academia
  2. I don’t generically feel much kinship with Asian-Americans (who are the most affected by purported discrimination in admissions), even if I might feel more kinship with them on average than I would with any other large ethnic group in America (which is itself not necessarily true)
  3. I don’t find it implausible that there are legitimate reasons to discriminate against Asian-Americans in the admissions process, if by ‘discriminate’ we mean ‘weigh their formal accomplishments less than one would for a member of a different race’
  4. At the end of the line, I believe that persistent whining about this is a reflection of emotional immaturity on the part of Steve et al., in that they seem to have a ‘chip on their shoulder’ which they are incapable of overcoming, and if they were actually taking a principled approach, they would come together and try to create a superior alternative to the radically broken university system, which will likely not be saved by any infusion of Asian students

Here’s what I think.

On 1), I don’t like the credentialism culture of modern academia either. Much of it is a superficial and soulless arms race. Not that grades, test scores, publications, citations, impact factor aren’t strong signals but they are prone to manipulation and artificial inflation, and that there are qualities of work not well-captured by those metrics. People are more or less compelled to single-mindedly play this game, often at the expense of actually substantial scholarship, if they are to survive in academia nowadays.

On 2), I hate to say that this country has become more toxically consumed by identity politics over the years, not to mention that people are judged at least subconsciously by who one is associated with. So collective bargaining is crucial for a group’s position on the status hierarchy.

On 3), there is that due to Asian-Americans’ and Asians in general having traditionally been the underdog, as well as their lack of media presence, which is intimately tied to the alienness of their names in the Western linguistic context, some people are inclined to view Asians are grinds who aren’t actually as capable as they might appear on paper. Especially with the whole tiger mother phenomenon that Amy Chua popularized with her infamous book. Of course, China’s rise over the recent years has altered this perception somewhat, especially the one that Asians are smart but not creative, though surely, it does seem that controlling for grades and test scores, or IQ, Asians do seem less creative, though that may be due to environmental factors, such as de facto or implicit quotas imposed by diversity mandates and economic circumstances.

On 4), I mostly disagree. Asian-Americans don’t really have the power to create a sufficiently credible alternative in a world that runs so heavily on associating with prestigious, usually long-established, institutions like Harvard and Goldman-Sachs. In their ancestral countries, China and India, Asians can improve the university and research system and the economic and technological competitiveness of the country as a whole, so as to make their universities more credible as well. In America, all Asian-Americans can really do is make more noise around the issue to exert more pressure on the elite universities, and also donate more and enhance their media and political presence as their socioeconomic position improves, especially at the elite end, improves, so that the elite universities perceive themselves as having more to lose from discriminating against Asian-Americans based on race.

This is all I have to say as pertains exclusively to Asian-Americans. I shall now give my thoughts on credentialism and selection in general.

The job of admissions and hiring committees and HR is astronomically harder than in the pre-internet age. So many people apply for positions they are grossly under-qualified for, now that it’s so easy to shoot off a resume or application online. There are, of course, application fees for college and grad schools, but they are not enough to deter. This means in the selection process can be afford now significantly less time per candidate, and one can argue that as a consequence, the process becomes more bureaucratic and easier to game. Often, people will in the pre-screening stage eliminate all applicants who do not meet certain formal criteria, such as minimum GPA/test scores or a certain degree from a certain set of sufficiently credible universities. In the case of academia, to my limited second-hand knowledge, committees will look at publications lists with a focus on citation count and impact factor of the journals on which the papers were published and also verify the candidate against senior, tenured faculty in the same or at least similar area of research. In the case of industry jobs, what matters more is the interview, where for technical roles, technical questions will be asked to further test the technical aptitude and knowledge, as well as, the softer aspects of communication and personal chemistry. For non-technicals, I can only say it’s even more about credentials (school, companies, job titles, dates of employment) and how you present yourself. I can only conclude that way more energy is expended now in aggregate on application and selection than before, which is quite costly really. In the career world, people are mostly out for themselves and don’t really care about wasting other people’s time, so long as they can get away with it with impunity more or less.

I’ll say that there is a tradeoff between optimizing for one’s formal credentials and optimizing for one’s actual ability and knowledge. One loses out so much more now if one neglects the former too much due to more competition per position. Surely, there has been gross inflation of credentials. This is in its crudest form epitomized by college’s having become the new high school, thereby rendering prestige of institution a stronger signal. Furthermore, the largely consequent grade inflation and watering down of coursework has added more noise to school transcripts. Contest training, for math in particular, has become so much more popularized, that to not have credentials in those raises questions in some circles, and moreover, there is so much more of an obstacle course of summer programs and scholarships and grants and internships and jobs which one must pass through to some degree if one wants a reasonable chance of success at a specified level. In this sense, there is more pressure to conform to an existing, often complexity-ridden system. It may well be that people nowadays are not all that much better in terms of knowledge and proficiency than before, correcting for the positive effects of technology on learning, but they actually put in much more time and effort.

Now, if one expends much energy on actual substance, there is concern as to what would be lost if those translate not into formal credentials. Arguably more common is the other way round, where one turns into a soulless credential-chasing machine. I’ve been amazed at how many people manage to achieve much higher grades, test scores, and awards than what their knowledge and ability from interaction with them would reasonably indicate. Those people tend to be very boring and risk-averse, and they are often the types our current system selects for, like it or not.

I used to feel like to prove that one is actually smart, at least in STEM, one ought to do sufficiently well in one of those major math, physics, or computing olympiads or contests. I would say that for raw technical ability, that is probably still the strongest signal. Grades are somewhat noisy, because it’s not hard to copy or snipe homework solutions, and for tests, there is a large cramming and figuring out what’s gonna be on the test component. Perhaps they are more consequentially so as there are also some genuinely capable or even brilliant students who for related personality reasons have a hard time getting themselves to care too much about grades. I’ve personally seen some high GPA people, even in college, who signal in what they say or write complete idiocy that would make you wonder if they were pretending stupid, especially if said person were female. Some people learn much more deeply and also much more broadly, outside of what the system teaches them, to a high level of retention, much of which is not captured through any formal credential. From my personal experience, tests of a wide range of knowledge, sufficiently substantial but not too esoteric, are stronger signals since they cannot be crammed for, but they are, for the difficulty of organization, seldom administered.

In the real world and in academia though, what matters is the ability to deliver actual projects and conduct meaningful research, and those, while correlated with ability to learn, are not quite the same. Those are also way more context-dependent, which means more noise, both due to more variance and more ambiguity of judgment.

I will say that at times or even often, society is met with the problem of people finagling themselves into a position to judge what they are not really qualified to, per their ability and expertise, which means some resume-padding bozos rising up and actual competents being passed over. This problem I believe has been accentuated by the ever more credentialist culture that has emerged over the recent years. What’s kind of sad is how the more conformism and risk-aversion rises, the more these traits are pressured and selected for.

I’ve come to notice that there tends to be some difference between maverick genius and the conformist first-rate professional. If one looks at history, real genius, the ones who create paradigm shifts, tends to have more very lopsided profiles, though surely, it might go too far to say that *most* of the real geniuses were out of it in a Stallman or Galois like fashion, especially as it’s the deranged ones which garner more attention. But one can say with high level of confidence that there were many real geniuses who had a hard time fitting in even into the elite mainstream of his profession, who have even been marginalized. I’ve been told that the real genius mathematicians like Perelman, Langlands, and Shimura more or less cut contact with the mathematical community apparently out of disgust. There is also evidence that plenty would-be real geniuses did not actually make it, with their enormous potential having been thwarted by the system at some point and hardly realized. In an ideal world that optimizes for collective value, if somebody else can do the job much better than you and actually really wants to, you should let him do the job and get out of his way. Of course, reality is far from that. I have personally felt that way with regard to my mathematical ability, often feeling that I wasn’t good enough when I failed to derive something on my own, yet I see so many people worse than I am even so eager to play the whole credentialist game without recognizing how deficient they really are. This suggests that I am very partial towards a certain side of the spectrum. I even feel that in some sense, nothing is more embarrassing then formally being much higher than what one’s ability actually merits, since it demonstrates not only incompetence but poor character. However, I am, regrettably, or not, feeling that circumstances are pressuring me ever more towards the opposite direction.

On manipulating perceptions

My thoughts on the importance of perception management, in addition to actually being good, by way of a chat log.

dude I think the jewish domination of liberal media is just IQ
if white americans are 100 SD 15, ashkenazim are 115 SD 15
Then if you look at 130+
In the US you have a 30:1 ratio but among 130+ you would expect like
2:1
dude like 1/3 of the 130+ whites in the US are jews
jewish verbal is probably even > 115 since spatial is lower
also they are coastal and liberal
 
lol you idiot it has much to do with personality socioeconomics culture too
 
which leads to more representation
yeah i’m saying that
coastal and liberal
already on the 2:1
updating more
 
Lol also if Jewish verbal is so high why are Asians beating them at PSAT/SAT
 
stats?
 
English/culture
 
Read Myth of American Meritocracy by Unz
 
link me the stats
 
I read it
 
He has stats there
 
have you read Janet Mertz takedown
 
Yes I’ve skimmed through that
 
Unz overestimates harvard % jewish
and underestimates other things
 
Sure he probably does a little
 
math olympiad % jewish
wait like half the white people at mop are jewish
like half
Since it can be hard to tell by surname
dude I think chinese americans have a massive
verbal IQ
way higher than of mainland china
maybe even higher than ashkenazim
But they haven’t been here long enough
like Jews in the 50s
also a lot of them are not interested
in verbal professions
 
how trainable is verbal SAT?
 
I agree the trainability of the SAT is overstated by people but cramming vocab is totally a thing, no
I dont trust unz statistics at all lol
 
Lol because Chinese-Americans know that verbal careers like law are rigged against them
So many strong ones are hesitant to enter
There’s a cultural affinity aspect to that as well
 
chinese prefer medicine or law
I think a lot of it also is that a society with a functional legal system is alien to most chinese people 😛
once I asked zuming whether china had a legal system
his response: No
 
Haha he’s both right and wrong
 
but yeah law is jewish
but I mean jews are not pulling the strings or anything
like
they are smart verbally
And they tend to be coastal and liberal
The tribe is not jews, it’s coastal liberals
130+ secular coastal liberals are like half jewish
but they dont think of themselves as jewish but as secular coastal liberals
like NYT columnists are half jewish
because 130+ secular costal liberals in the US are half jewish
 
Lol lol
 
if you add the adjective new york
secular new york coastal liberals
it’s a majority easily
 
NYT columnists
 
like manhattan is 20% jewish
 
NYT is full of garbage
 
?
its pretty reliable
Sometimes they call Rouhani a “moderate” and I wince – he’s certainly better than ahmadenijad, but he’s no moderate … “pragmatist” is the right word
 
You really need to broaden your horizons lol
 
hmm?
 
See politically, the Anglo world is setting the standards right now
 
yes, I very much enjoy not living in a society with sesame credit
 
sesame credit?
 
yes
 
I don’t even know what that is
 
china could become an orwellian state
 
Oh that
 
isn’t that great
 
Orwellian state what does that even mean
 
 
It’s just this phrase for evil regime coined by the Anglo media based on the works of an Anglo writer, that’s all.
I’ve read 1984 and Animal Farm
They’re pretty good
Very hyperbolic of course, as is much media
I actually exchanged briefly with Unz
 
ok
 
Maybe I should ask him about what he thinks of Jews being subsumed into the white category in these racial classifications
What do you think of these IQ tests as actual measures of real, biological intelligence
They are very noisy for sure
Especially verbal, because exposure to language varies widely
 
on an individual level
noisy
on a group level good
they are measuring something important
Whether it’s 100% genetic I dont know
I doubt it
 
Lol when most Chinese kids’ parents don’t know English all that well
Heck I’m even unfamiliar with some of the more colloquial English language
People viewed me as funny for it in school
 
sure
what do you think about steven pinker
he’s one of my favorite people
 
No opinion of him
Also those tests are noisy predictors of actual ability on real things as well from my observation
The discrimination against Asians in admissions right now is likely partially premised on the perception that their test scores inflate their actual ability due to prep.
There is still the perception that Asians do well in school but don’t go on to do great things
Again it’s only a perception
Being good and being perceived as good are far from perfectly correlated.
 
I think there is discrimnation against asians
for being recent
for being perceived as grade grubbers
 
Yeah they’re also not rich or well-connected.
 
this perception is not wholly unjustified ofc
yeah also that
i am strongly opposed to ivy asian quotas
 
There is resistance towards Asians becoming successful in America
It’s a white country after all
 
eh
 
Anyhow, I think in a matter of time, the best young people in China will come here for grad school less and less.
America will become a place for China to send its second-rates.
I’ve written that China needs to get better at marketing
 
china gives 0 shits about academics
it’s way too right wing to care about academics
 
too right wing?
And I’ve read on Zhihu that in recent years, the Chinese who studied math in France have turned out better than the ones who came to US for grad school.
 
that’s about france vs US
not china vs US
 
Lol math I think the best young people will still study abroad for a while.
There’s also engineering
Plenty of that China does well now.
I think in actual STEM ability/competence, China/Chinese still have much room for improvement, but now, they’re not bad, and the potential is there, with trends in favor of them.
It’s the whole game of manipulating perceptions that will take longer
Due to cultural difference and inertia
In that regard, it’s already been massively successful in just the last five years if you think about it
The media portrayal in the West has already drastically changed.
For instance, dismissiveness of Chinese tech companies is metamorphizing into fear.
I’m not gonna argue whether or not it’s gone to the other extreme
People can have different opinions on that
In any case, I don’t think China has transitioned to foundational innovator, that’ll take a while, but the increasing level of sophistication combined with the scale is certainly very formidable.
China still relies on US companies for its semiconductors/chips. She has not created a viable ecosystem for its homegrown ones yet. But that could well happen in a decade.
Then US will have even less bargaining chip.
Now, China can easily get away with what it’s doing to Taiwan largely because it is so much stronger economically, technologically, and militarily.
 
jack ma is a smart guy
but I mean
 
Nobody wants to piss off the powerful, because there’s much to lose.
 
china’s system doesnt make too much room for jack ma and yitang zhang
The lack of political freedom is a big obstacle here
 
Lol Jack Ma isn’t smart IQ wise
Struggled to get into a college
He has other qualities
 
The lack of political freedom is a big problem for innovation
 
Hahaha
Elaborate on that one 
 
Name a totalitarian society that was innovative
Germany under the Kaiser wasn’t really totalitarian
 
Uh, USSR?
 
all their jewish scientists moved to america and israel
ussr had good academics, certainly
Because they prevented them from leaving
They didn’t have much in the way of tech
 
Uh, Sputnik?
 
low tech
very low tech
your cell phone is better
there won’t be a chinese steve jobs
 
Sure computer technology they were behind, because semi-conductors and integrated circuits were invented in America
Lol Steve Jobs is mostly marketing 
 
shockley
eugenics
chinese bill gates
 
And what you say about Sputnik is ridiculous
First satellite in orbit
That was back in 1957 silly
You don’t think Ren Zhengfei is as impressive as Steve Jobs?
Huawei
So much of the global telecommunications infrastructure
Now their phones, which US is banning.
 
So
Lol what if China once it has the resources starts a huge propaganda/PR war
You bitch about totalitarianism
China has a ton of young people with nothing to do.
Have them troll the YouTube comments, drown out all the anti-communist Chinese.
Numbers do matter
The Chinese government could also incentivize more people in the West to start blogs supportive of Chinese ideology.
Try to buy out US media outlets
You don’t think China once it is advantaged in resources can start playing the game of manufacturing consent as well