A Chinese theoretical physicist on freedom of speech, lack thereof in civilized society

As for the words of that physicist, he was too articulate about it, that high V. Everybody who’s not delusional is pretty much aware of what he’s saying, but few can say as articulately and expressively. I published his words in an article on Zhihu, in Chinese of course. I will translate it to English for a few of you here. It’s of course much more expressive in Chinese but not all that much is lost in translation either.

越是文明社会越是没有言论自由,你在美国你当然可以批评那个美国总统因为美国总统与你没啥关系啊,你敢随便批评你的顶头上司吗。这是你生活经历告诉你的啊,文明社会人与人之间有这么多关系。你当然是因为自人利益啊,你当然不能随便说话。我就拿这个主流媒体来讲。只要不是白痴都知道这个犹太人掌握这个媒体但有谁感讲啊,你要讲的话你老板你犹太老板立马就把你给解雇了。一解雇你那个房贷车贷,你不是在哈弗大学读书那学费去哪里找啊。在原始社会人才是自由的。中国有句话叫做无欲则刚啊。你只有没有欲望,不需要祈求别人的时候,你才有言论自由。所我一直觉得欧美人所以一种幻想,说他们是民主社会什么言论自由,完全是一种幻觉,批评总统有啥,批评总统算个屁啊,算啥本事啊,有种批评你的顶头上司批评你的同事。

The more civilized the society, the less there is freedom of speech. In America, you can of course criticize that American president because the American president has no relation with you, but do you dare to criticize your immediate superior? This is what your life experience has told you, that in a civilized society, there are so many relations between people. Of course you are for your own personal interest, you of course cannot speak as one pleases. I can just use the mainstream media to explain. So long as one is not an imbecile, it’s universally known that those Jews control the media but who dares to say it, if you say it, your boss, your Jewish boss, will immediately fire you. Once you’re fired, that house mortgage, auto mortgage of yours, your Harvard tuition, where will you find that money. Only in a primitive society is there freedom. China has a proverb known as “devoid of desire, thus hard and firm.” Only when you have no desires, no need to appeal to others, do you have freedom of speech. So I always say that Europeans and Americans per a type of delusion, say they are a democratic society, a society with freedom of speech, it’s completely an illusion. Criticize the president so what, proves what, if you have courage, criticize your immediate superior, criticize your colleagues.

As an FYI, I feel like China is so much more free, speech-wise, in many ways, in ways which matter much more. A few of my writings on Zhihu got deleted for referring to a combination of words for “Xi Jinping,” “anti,” and “dictator,” that’s okay. (I was, predictably, either referring to some individual or some case of the US media, but the automated censorship bot I guess cannot detect that.)

After hearing words from that physicist, I can better understand why. Because, in China, in Chinese, amongst ourselves, people don’t have to give a damn about what America thinks, about what Westerners think. There is an invaluable freedom and expressiveness in that unattainable outside of China and the Chinese language.

So China is in some sense the only place in the world where the media is virtually free from Western influence and control. I feel ever more proud and privileged now to be born Chinese in mainland China who took the time and effort to learn well the language and culture, despite having been in America since age 6. Because of that, if things really don’t work out for me in America, I can always go back to a powerful and independent country where I am welcome and have family and roots, where I can truly belong. Because of that, I need not be unlike many a white peer of mine a mental slave to a country and culture mired in decadent political correctness anti-civilization.

Finally, I shall note in particular of something I was reminded of by his words “if you have courage, criticize your immediate superior, criticize your colleagues.” This will likely come as quite a surprise, or even shocking, to many. That based on what I’ve read and heard, never having experienced it myself, that much describes what China was like during the Cultural Revolution, with the big character posters and public denunciations. People were encouraged to openly criticize their bosses, their colleagues, their leaders, in the workplace and outside. In that political climate, your boss could not really do anything to you. Of course, it led to some chaos and tragedies with many innocent people attacked and pushed aside, and certain groups took advantage of it for their own personal interest. More positively, a few adults in China who actually experienced it have characterized it to me as “an experience of genuine freedom of speech, of democratic monitoring of those in power achieved by the Chinese people that far exceeded anything America has ever experienced.” As unintuitive as it may be to those in the American mindset, a lack of rigid rule of law actually gives the majority of people much more freedom and leverage. After all, rule of law easily becomes a tool of the elites. Why wait for a scoundrel on top to be formally tried and convicted, likely never to happen with the protection of the legal system a built in his favor, when hordes of people, angry at what is more often than not clear injustice committed, can in the absence of “rule of law” reign in on him with unrestrained criticism and harassment? The majority of people have a conscience. In this world, there is no love without reason, and there is no hate without reason. Almost always, if there are masses of people who hate you to the bone, then you probably did some real injustice to them. I’ve noticed that if you examine the style of speech and criticism on the Chinese internet, as well as the reasoning behind it, you’ll find some of this flavor. There is less of a certain type of “civility” more the norm in America but in exchange more of a freedom of speech rare now in American society, crudely speaking. Contrary to the artificial American stereotype, Chinese are actually a really rebellious people. China has arguably the richest political revolutionary history and tradition of the 20th century. Americans are actually very tame in comparison. There is gross exploitation, anti-meritocracy, and lying that goes on with virtual impunity in America of a nature almost unimaginable in Chinese society, which has been endowed with a political consciousness per historical experience much stronger in substance in many ways.